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1

Actually, the data on your iPhone 6 is encrypted at rest and furthermore no data comes off the device even if it is connected to a computer. Someone would need to brute force the PIN and then press Trust to trust a computer which would then be able to transfer off data or sync the device. It's suspicious you got password resets. Perhaps the lock screen was ...


0

If you request a single asset, such as an image on the site, over HTTPS then Safari will show you the padlock. For example, choose an image on the page you are looking at, Ctrl-click/Right-click the image, choose to view that image in a new Tab. In the new tab the content you are viewing isn't mixed because it is a single element and Safari will show you ...


0

After biting the bullet and purchasing a code signing certificate, I can now answer my own question with all certainty: Short answer: No, the warnings don't go on OS X - although they do in web browsers. Long(er) answer: Technically certificates from Comodo or any other certificate authority that is trusted do work on Mac and you can absolutely sign .apps ...


1

as answered by stuffe, one of the possibilities is to use keychain syncing. there are 2 requirements phone must have the wifi password already computer must be able to access the internet if your iPhone is able to use "personal hotspot", then you can do this: turn on personal hotspot connect computer to personal hotspot - this will initiate the ...


0

From your description, they had the PIN for only the time it took to unlock it, check it was working & hand it to you - a matter of seconds. There's nothing else they can do with it unless they also still have your phone. The PIN itself doesn't provide access to anything other than the phone, has nothing to do with your iCloud account, App Store, ...


-2

It shouldn't affect your mac, but if you move the files to other computers, they could get infected.


0

An experimental (very rare) kernel infection exists for the Mac, called Thunderstrike. It is actually still being developed as a proof of concept, along with some other experimental malware for OS X, but at its current stage (version 2) it is able to travel via thunderbolt storage devices and infect other Macs. Some conspire that the NSA is behind many of ...


0

Actually, there is indeed a low but very real chance to get infected. There are 2 ways in which files on a disk can infect a computer: If the file is an executable e.g. .exe or .app, it contains code that is run on the machine if a user tells the computer to do so. Windows executables cannot run on a Mac and Mac executables cannot run on Windows, so a ...


0

To solve "Your connection is not private" issue I went to keychain access, typed verisign in search and deleted them. Clicked keys emblem on left , they were gone, then rebooted chrome. Now it works. Thanks for the help. I have a MacBook OS X (10.6.8 )


2

If the site is being accessed over HTTPS, then the lock icon is shown (in black). If the HTTPS certificate has been verified, the lock icon is shown in green. Both are secure, however the latter vouches for the authenticity of the site as well as the security of the connection. For example: https://www.icloud.com/ shows a green lock icon, having been ...


0

Your JAR files will be considered as Safe once you sign it using Comodo Code Signing Certificate. Comodo Code Signing Certificate is compatible with Mac OS, Linux, Windows, so you will not get any warning or alert message in your OS X. This article will help you to understand how Comodo Code Signing certificate secure .Jar files - ...


0

A possible solution would be to use the Imac to share a network conenction over wifi which in effect also creates a hotspot. In preferences go to sharing. Pick network sharing in the list. It has options to set a wifi password and you can then choose to share internet from something to wifi. Unforetuntely apple "fixed" it in mountain lion or lion that ...


2

I had to add add to your command for it to work on OS X. First, connect your vpn and find the interface name: ifconfig. Mine was also ppp0. Then run: sudo route -v add -net 10.41.0.0 -netmask 255.255.0.0 -interface ppp0. -net is a modifier on the add command. Works like a charm.


2

Select the folder in Finder and open Get Info (⌘I). Click the padlock in the bottom-right corner of the Get Info window and authenticate. Set up the permissions, then click the gear and select Apply to enclosed items….


19

Why is Apple using a vulnerable version of OpenSSL? It isn't. If you click on the link you posted in your question, you will see that this update patches a number of vulnerabilities which exist identically in OpenSSL 0.9.8, 1.0.0, 1.0.1, and 1.0.2. So, in other words, the version you are later suggesting as an alternative, 1.0.2, was just as ...


14

OpenSSL is deprecated officially. It exists (for what little time Apple allows going forward) to not break software that doesn't either migrate to Apple's alternative or bundle SSL internally with the app. See the Apple Developer link for the deprecation announcement: (the other links are easier reading / more synthesis of the why as to the what) ...


2

Nothing is allowed until you poke holes in the app sandbox. iOS requires apps to request permission to access data outside their sandbox. Open the settings app and look at privacy on iOS to see what your iOS and app have negotiated. Most people expose far more data to Facebook by entering their credentials in the Internet Accounts section of the iOS ...


1

I am on Snow Leopard (10.6), and this solution has appeared to work for me: Find the files /Library/LaunchAgents/at.obdev.LittleSnitchUIAgent.plist /Library/LaunchDaemons/at.obdev.littlesnitchd.plist and set their permissions such that "everyone" has No Access, and any account or group that you want to have access to Little Snitch has at least Read ...


-2

Do you need an Antivirus Software on OS X? Yes, yes you do need some sort of antivirus app for your Mac OS X and my reason for saying that is simple. Viruses exist for every known Operating System. It is true that Apple’s Operating system for Macs is safer and more naturally protected against Viruses but the REAL truth is that Mac systems are not as ...


1

How does the Facebook app access SMS data? If by SMS data you mean your texts Facebook cannot access your texts or iMessages Facebook cannot send texts or iMessages Facebook cannot see who you are texting or messaging If by SMS data you mean your cellular E/3G/4G/LTE connection You can disable this by going to Settings -> Cellular and switching ...


0

...in iOS an application can access only its own keychain items Vendors can share data across their applications, using the Keychain as long as they are using a keychain group, defined in the entitlements in their app bundle; "it's own" means vendor, not application. As others have pointed out, the keychain entries may not get cleaned up implicitly. ...


9

It is secure to keep it linked to her iCloud. It will remain Activation Locked, which makes it unusable. The data is not at risk because you've deleted it from the device, remotely. If this had not been done and Lost Mode was activated, you could have located the device. Removing it from iCloud will, enable the thief to use it. If there are no backups, ...


0

It probably uses iCloud as a method, possibly the iCloud Key-Value Store. As far as that storage goes… The total space available in your app’s iCloud key-value storage is 1 MB per user. The maximum number of keys you can specify is 1024, and the size limit for each value associated with a key is 1 MB. For example, if you store a single large value ...


1

Apple advises developers to store app login credentials in the encrypted iOS Keychain. When you delete an app from your phone it doesn't delete the related records from the Keychain. Keychains are secure storage containers, which means that when the keychain is locked, no one can access its protected contents. In OS X, users can unlock a ...


3

The simple answer is no. Best practices on multi-user Macs dictate Standard accounts for all users, with a separate administrator account setup for maintenance work (software installs and/or updates, etc.) The philosophy is that with great power comes great responsibility, and an innocent mistake can cause havoc. Daily use of Macs (and PCs for that matter) ...


0

All the tools you need to protect your data (and quit worrying about it) are already on your mac. Use file vault. Encrypt your backup drive too. Do regular backups via TimeMachine and when you do go in for service understand that they may need test and if you don't give them a password, that means they're going to wipe your machine to finish testing. I've ...



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