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Short Version: I've used this method in El Capitan and it works. However, the connection is not very stable and takes long to activate. I would not recommend using this method if you have software that rely on using 127.0.0.1/localhost (ie:1Password). Long Version: I use this method when I'm performing Keynote presentations. I had my macbook air in ...


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You should way the risks and ensure that if in fact someone is trying to take advantage of your account or even using social engineering to compromise your account, you minimize the damage that could happen. • You should call Apple support again, perhaps using the same ticket number, and explain your situation yet again. Explain to them what you just ...


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VMware Workstation 12 on Windows 10. The steps does work. It will boot into a window that let u reinstall the OS, disk utilities, and two other options (I can' remember). Then above you will see "Window" click it and you will see a drop down that allow access to terminal. then type: csrutil disable Restart the VM.


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If one web app works and another doesn't you would probably need to contact support to determine if the problem is with your account or with Apple's infrastructure. Also, you will want to be sure you are really connecting to Apple sites (some computers and networks are compromised by malicious software). If you are connecting to a site that is imitating / ...


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I have asked the Little Snitch development team at obdev about this issue. Here is the response: In fact local traffic over AFP or SMB protocol is routed by the mach_kernel process on newer OS X systems. It is defined as /mach_kernel on 10.10.x. I'm on OS X 10.11.4 here, where the process path is now /System/Library/Kernels/kernel ...


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There is only one root account on every OS X computer and it is disabled by default. It doesn't have a password and you can't login as root unless you specifically use Directory Utility and enable it. It's dangerous, because when logged in as root the system bypasses all authorization - it doesn't even ask for a password. In that aspect, an OS X computer is ...


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Let me see how your reasons would work or not: Admin accounts are not root. While true, they may be able to call sudo and perhaps they may even have the password ready for input (or sudo was configured not to ask for password). SIP (System Integrity Protection): This is only one layer which is not enough for all attacks. Can be disabled? Even better! ...


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There are probably other reasons, but here's mine: it is not possible to place restrictions on the admin account. It is useful to have restrictions in place to prevent oneself from visiting undesirable or dangerous sites.


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You will lose the visibility of your services on other computers (i.e. Finder sidebar). If you don't have any sharing services running than it is of no consequence and would be equivalent of a firewall not allowing multicast traffic from your Mac. Because you did not completly disable Bonjour you will still benefit from seeing others on the network and ...


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Did she use an iCloud account registered to your company or to her personally? Admin accounts that require an email address to set up (like iCloud) should be using a corporate address like "admin@company.com" and not an address tied to a specific user. This means that when the user leaves, a replacement will be able to use the same account without having to ...


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There's basically two things you need to do to secure your Mac from a (involuntarily) separated employee: Secure from outside access Change all passwords This is an overlapping approach because neither are 100% foolproof. However, if you remove as many of the access paths from outside the organization, whatever is missed will be covered by the changed ...


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Safest thing to do would be to log that user out of iCloud entirely (http://appsliced.co/ask/how-do-i-log-out-of-icloud-on-my-mac) Make sure you choose "Keep on Mac" when it asks if you want to retain the data from the iCloud accounts various features.


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security find-generic-password -ga <account> You can find the account by opening Keychain Access, opening the application password (titled Exchange) and looking at the Account field. It should be in the form emailaddress@server e.g. ‘username@example.com@mail.example.com’. Upon running this command, you will be prompted to allow access to the item ...


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I solved my problem. The problem was that the pin on the smartkey was "locked", maybe some one inserted it wrong a couple of time. When I restored the pin with the PUK and then inserted the new pin on the website, it all worked out. For your information the smartkey was the ArubaKey, if someone should have the same problem.


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It is generally considered best practice to use an account that has no more privileges than are required. What this means generally is that you should use an account that has the lowest privilege level possible, and elevate your privileges when it is needed for a specific task that requires the higher privileges. However, this gets annoying rather quickly. ...


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You can reset your login keychain by opening Keychain Access from /Applications/Utilities and in Preferences selecting Reset My Default Keychain. Be aware of the statement shown beside the reset button.


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Yeah. you can restore it. there're many software that can scan your iPhone and lost all your data deleted or existing on your iPhone, you can preview and find if there are the files that you want to recover.


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Once erased by the failed passcode attempts, the phone will be put in Activation Lock (assuming you have iOS 7 or later and have enabled Find My iPhone). You will need to unlock it using the Apple ID it is linked to. From there, you can restore the phone from a previous backup.


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I just had a similar experience and got off the phone with a rep from Apple and they said there is nothing they can do to help. Any email account can be used to sign up for an apple ID if it has not already been used as an apple ID, so someone used my other email account, not linked to Apple as their ID log in name. Their email is the emergency email and ...


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Security is best implemented as a Multi Layered, Multi Vectored Strategy. The Principle of Least Privilege (POLP) is just another cog in the machine that keeps your computer secure. Everything that you listed there are all good but none of that will prevent someone from taking over your computer with an exploit such as the Dropped Drive Hack. How does a ...



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