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33

There's an OS X feature called authenticated restart that stores the FileVault key in the SMC for the duration of the reboot. Apple acknowledges in the manpage that it does reduce FileVault security for the duration of the restart: On supported hardware, fdesetup allows restart of a FileVault-enabled system without requiring unlock during the subsequent ...


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Set up your new User as a Sharing Only account, this gives them no actual account on the computer itself that they can log into… System Prefs > Users & Groups Click the lock Click the + sign to add a new User Set the new account to sharing only from the drop menu [stepped out on the pic for clarity] Ref : Apple KB - OS X Yosemite: Create a ...


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You can create a low-numbered user via dscl, as per this Apple support page and it will be hidden from most views. Also, I believe that if you set the user home directory to something like /var/empty then ssh will log in but the gui will not.


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You can't make it truly secure; there is a saying that says given enough time, physical access is root access. That being said, there are some steps you can take to get as close as possible. FileVault Enable filevalult. This will keep people from accessing your data if they boot from an external drive. To do this, go to System Preferences -> Security & ...


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Slack is a well-known chatting tool and I am yet to hear it does any surveillance. Also, every single Mac app which is submitted into App Store after June 1 of 2012 must have sandboxing implemented or it won't be approved. Additionally, no app is able to access your computer outside of its limits unless you give it your root password (Slack does not ask for ...


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The root CAs are stored in: /System/Library/Keychains/SystemCACertificates.keychain /System/Library/Keychains/SystemRootCertificates.keychain Yes, these are OS X keychain files which are opaque, though not necessarily proprietary. You could theoretically use OS X's Keychain Services APIs to get at the certificate data inside the keychain file, but that ...


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System Integrity Protection (SIP.) It locks up a variety of files to prevent malicious software from modifying it including /System. You can temporarily disable SIP, modify your files, then turn it back on if you want to have the maximum protection.


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If the hard drive is not encrypted, then it's not at all secure! Basically anybody can take the hard disk, put it into an external enclosure and connect it to another Mac to read all files on the disk.


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Sorted: type in the terminal xattr -d com.apple.quarantine leave a space after "quarantine" and then drag & drop the .app file. Then press Return...et voila'! The -cr flag is for operating systems before (and including) Mavericks. For newer operating systems (Yosemite & El Capitan) you must specify the flag -d along with the attribute ...


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This is a tough one to answer. I have seen discussions on MacInTouch.com about just this subject. And if you keep up with news online about such tings you will find that opinions vary from "Chicken Little" to, "nah, don't worry about it on a Mac." The truth likely lives somewhere between the two. Generally viruses of all types have a bit of a harder time ...


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The only way to keep your Mac safe while you are away is to power it down. Period. Even then, leaving your Mac unattended may not be a good idea, but at least your data is safe, just in case the Mac got stolen. FV2 does a great job protecting your data, but unless your Mac is powered down, there are potential ways for an attacker to compromise it and get ...


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Yes it is possible, you can create a blocking rule using pf, that only allows traffic on the the port your torrent software is using, to/from the virtual interface created by the VPN. Take a look at a cheat sheet for pf for ideas. Or if you prefer a GUI you might check out icefloor.



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