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3

The iOS Keychain is not deleted, when the app is deleted. So if the keychain still contains the necessary credentials the app can just log in.


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The security command is working as expected, and is following the same keychain access policies that any other program would follow. Accessing a user's keychain is not an admin function -- the user's keychain belongs to them, so admin access is irrelevant. On the other hand, the System keychain (/Library/Keychains//System.keychain) is "owned by" the ...


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When a wipe occurs, the file system key is deleted. It's as simple as that. Page 11 of the September 2015 iOS Security White Paper states that the file system key is stored in NAND. The metadata of all files in the file system is encrypted with a random key, which is created when iOS is first installed or when the device is wiped by a user. The file ...


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Basically, if you can execute arbitrary code or write to arbitrary disk locations, you're jailbroken. iOS security researcher Stefan Esser (also knows as i0n1c) has developed an application called System and Security Info to determine if an iOS device is currently jailbroken by testing for the abilities that you gain from jailbreaking. Update: Apple has ...


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Twitter (and by association, Vine) has a native iOS login in Settings, separate from the app itself. Deleting the app doesn't remove your accounts, or log you out.


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It is a feature called activation lock Click for more info I would suggest changing your Apple ID password to something simple then after about 5 minutes change it back


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This answer is based on the comments as the user perhapsmaybeharry covered how Bonjour works and how to disable it. Edit: New info - Most of the time this computer is not showing up. But it has a few times the last month. So it really feel like someone has gotten into my network. PLEASE HELP!] This could be anything from a shared computer that has ...


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Q1: Yes, it looks like someone entered your Apple ID and password. I don't think there's any other situation where this type of dialog would be triggered. Q2: You did the right thing in immediately changing your password. There's nothing you can do to get more info on who is using your ID, you did everything I would've suggested. My only remaining advice ...


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There are a few ways to keep your mac secured. Use a firewall like Little Snitch. It monitors all incoming and outgoing traffic. You'll get asked if you approve or deny a connection. Don't download stuff like warez, torrents or any other form of illegal downloads. I know this sounds to obvious but always double check where your file is coming from. When ...


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I don't use a virus scanner on my Macs and never have, but then I have been supporting Macs since 1990 and have a real good idea what to do and what not to do to avoid malware. That said I have still had a couple of close shaves in the past few years. Close shaves that anyone without intimate knowledge of the platform (EG someone who works on Macs for a ...


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Use Little Snitch 3 for that. You can use Automatic Profile Switching for your filter rules depending on the network you are in. For your specific WiFi just block everything except your browser for that. https://www.obdev.at/products/littlesnitch/index.html


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sshd logging is determined in /etc/asl/com.openssh.sshd. In short, you need to touch a file and then send syslogd a HUP signal: touch /var/run/com.openssh.sshd-asl-enabled kill -HUP $(ps -ef | grep [s]yslogd | awk '{print $2}') After that, you will find the logs in /var/log/sshd.log



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