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5

As far as I can tell its just means as long as it's connected via bluetooth and in range. There isn't a Touch ID scanner on the watch or anything like that so I don't think that it forms an knid of "signature" to you.


5

I interpret the watch being connected to you as it can tell that the clasp is secured to a living human wrist and then can detect when the strap comes off that living human. Apple calls this feature Wrist Detect So, if you were to put the watch on your friend and then authenticate Apple Pay - they could use your pay token for as long as the battery lasted ...


3

I found an answer that works perfectly (although it requires temporarily adding a password to your user first): Open the Terminal Type: sudo visudo Enter your user's password (create one if necessary). Change this line FROM: %admin ALL=(ALL) ALL TO: %admin ALL=(ALL) NOPASSWD: ALL (press 'i' to enter insert mode if you can't edit the text) Write and ...


2

The documentation only uses you to mean a person. The documentation is written with an owner in mind, so it refers to you, the reader, but not so specific as to your singular identity. It is not possible to uniquely identify people through the wrist. Any specific identification magic largely comes from communication with the paired iPhone.


2

I'm afraid there are not many options given an ordinary, "home user" budget. Theoretically you could send the drive in to a recovery service such as IBAS to get them to recover the original data on the drive. If this is even remotely possible depends on what kind of physical medium you had (i.e. is it SSD or spinning-platter hard drive). If they can recover ...


2

This is simple job for AppleScript. First off make sure you're redirecting the standard output to a file by doing sudo security dump-keychain -d login.keychain > ~/Desktop/loginKeychain.txt. Before doing this command open up Script Editor, it should be in /Applications/Utilities/ then paste this: tell application "System Events" repeat while exists ...


1

There is Keychaindump tool written by Juuso Salonen which is a proof-of-concept tool for reading OS X keychain passwords as root. Basic usage: $ sudo ./keychaindump ~/Library/Keychains/login.keychain Example output: $ sudo ./keychaindump [*] Searching process 15 heap range 0x7fa809400000-0x7fa809500000 [*] Searching process 15 heap range ...


1

I've had a 960GB JetDrive 720 since September 2014 and have been running Yosemite since release. I found that enabling trim on Yosemite caused instabilities, and the system would lock up very regularly. I was in regular contact with Transcend about this for a while. I like to think that the removal of trim from the JetDrive toolbox on Yosemite was down to my ...


1

The issue isn't with Firefox or Apple. It is Java itself that is blocking the application. The way to fix this is to add the website to the Exception Site List within Java Control Panel. Open System Preferences and click on Java, which should launch Java Control Panel. Select the Security tab and click the "Edit Site List..." button near the bottom. Then ...


1

If you give an application your administrative password (during e.g. a software installation or update) it can indeed change your system settings. An application running on the system that have been granted administrative rights can also turn it off. Try turning the firewall on, rebooting the machine, and see if it’s then turned off when you boot it. Should ...



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