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4

Not particularly at any grave security risk since Apple is supporting and releasing security updates to OS X for n-3 generations of the OS as of August 2014: Mavericks (10.9) Mountain Lion (10.8) Lion (10.7) Snow Leopard (10.6) This is documented on the main support page at http://www.apple.com/support/osx/ I haven't seen any time when n-2 were not ...


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To restore a device using iTunes, iTunes itself requires an internet connection. Furthermore, the status of Find My iPhone is obtained from the device as well as Apple's servers—iTunes knows if the device you're attempting to restore has Find My iPhone enabled and will prevent the device from being restored. The only way to restore a device with Find My ...


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Typical software (Apple Remote Desktop, Casper, Absolute, VNC, etc) that allows remote monitoring of Macs will be reliant on a few things that the end user controls, assuming they have administrative privileges. In System Preferences > Sharing a lot of this control is determined using these two preferences. Remote Management is centered around the ...


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This is too large a trust you want to give to osascript. Do you want this command to run without asking you for a real confirmation: sudo osascript -e 'tell app "Finder" to quit' ?


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It is possible to do this using hdiutil and openssl. The essence of the solution is to use the -certificate option of hdiutil. This field expects a DER formatted certificate that will be used during the encryption. The certificate can be used later to decrypt the volume via the -recover option of hdutil. 10 year duration is used on the certificates ...


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If a website is serving some content over HTTPS and some over HTTP then you shouldn't trust it. It's that simple. It doesn't matter what certificate it is using for the secure parts. If part of the content is being loaded over an insecure connection then you don't know if it has been interfered with, and you don't know if it is interfering with the securely ...


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Short answer is no — you have no guarantee that the malware hasn't removed a seldom-used genuine Apple kernel module and given itself the same name. Malware is very good at hiding — often compromised Unix systems (such as OS X) get custom versions of system utilities that won't show the malware (see slides 39-41 here).


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A panic report isn't the right tool to investigate malware. Many crashes are coming from commercial and not evil conceived pieces of software. Some of them are coming from MacOS X directly. Crash doesn't mean malware. Most of the time you can't reproduce these crashes at will. To hide their tracks, most crapware will change their name as soon as activated. ...


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The security of your keychain depends upon two things. Who has access to your Mac both physically and to log in. How secure your password is. The first is quite easy to control. Don't let anyone you don't trust have an admin account on your Mac or have access to the backups and room where the Mac sits. If someone never gets a hold of your keychain ...


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Maximum security if you’re that worried. Otherwise, just enable Lock when sleeping. I’m not that worried because to view the password in Keychain Items requires your account password.


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Flash has a control panel is system preferences that you can make these settings changes. In my version (admittedly older) there is a tab for "Camera and Mic" where you can manage camera and microphone settings by site/



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