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19

Why is Apple using a vulnerable version of OpenSSL? It isn't. If you click on the link you posted in your question, you will see that this update patches a number of vulnerabilities which exist identically in OpenSSL 0.9.8, 1.0.0, 1.0.1, and 1.0.2. So, in other words, the version you are later suggesting as an alternative, 1.0.2, was just as ...


14

OpenSSL is deprecated officially. It exists (for what little time Apple allows going forward) to not break software that doesn't either migrate to Apple's alternative or bundle SSL internally with the app. See the Apple Developer link for the deprecation announcement: (the other links are easier reading / more synthesis of the why as to the what) ...


9

It is secure to keep it linked to her iCloud. It will remain Activation Locked, which makes it unusable. The data is not at risk because you've deleted it from the device, remotely. If this had not been done and Lost Mode was activated, you could have located the device. Removing it from iCloud will, enable the thief to use it. If there are no backups, ...


3

The simple answer is no. Best practices on multi-user Macs dictate Standard accounts for all users, with a separate administrator account setup for maintenance work (software installs and/or updates, etc.) The philosophy is that with great power comes great responsibility, and an innocent mistake can cause havoc. Daily use of Macs (and PCs for that matter) ...


3

You'll either have to change the settings under System Preferences > Security & Privacy > General > Allow applications downloaded from: to Anywhere or in a Terminal, strip the xattr com.apple.quarantine attribute from the downloaded file(s). xattr -dr com.apple.quarantine "unidentified_thirdparty.app"


2

Select the folder in Finder and open Get Info (⌘I). Click the padlock in the bottom-right corner of the Get Info window and authenticate. Set up the permissions, then click the gear and select Apply to enclosed items….


2

I had to add add to your command for it to work on OS X. First, connect your vpn and find the interface name: ifconfig. Mine was also ppp0. Then run: sudo route -v add -net 10.41.0.0 -netmask 255.255.0.0 -interface ppp0. -net is a modifier on the add command. Works like a charm.


2

If the site is being accessed over HTTPS, then the lock icon is shown (in black). If the HTTPS certificate has been verified, the lock icon is shown in green. Both are secure, however the latter vouches for the authenticity of the site as well as the security of the connection. For example: https://www.icloud.com/ shows a green lock icon, having been ...


2

Nothing is allowed until you poke holes in the app sandbox. iOS requires apps to request permission to access data outside their sandbox. Open the settings app and look at privacy on iOS to see what your iOS and app have negotiated. Most people expose far more data to Facebook by entering their credentials in the Internet Accounts section of the iOS ...


1

How does the Facebook app access SMS data? If by SMS data you mean your texts Facebook cannot access your texts or iMessages Facebook cannot send texts or iMessages Facebook cannot see who you are texting or messaging If by SMS data you mean your cellular E/3G/4G/LTE connection You can disable this by going to Settings -> Cellular and switching ...


1

I am on Snow Leopard (10.6), and this solution has appeared to work for me: Find the files /Library/LaunchAgents/at.obdev.LittleSnitchUIAgent.plist /Library/LaunchDaemons/at.obdev.littlesnitchd.plist and set their permissions such that "everyone" has No Access, and any account or group that you want to have access to Little Snitch has at least Read ...


1

Apple advises developers to store app login credentials in the encrypted iOS Keychain. When you delete an app from your phone it doesn't delete the related records from the Keychain. Keychains are secure storage containers, which means that when the keychain is locked, no one can access its protected contents. In OS X, users can unlock a ...


1

While I am generally less-than satisfied with security testing on OS X, many Kali-inherited utilities run fine under OS X via HomeBrew, e.g., afl-fuzz, aircrack-ng, amap, argus, arp-scan, arping, binutils, binwalk, bro, capstone, cowpatty, crunch, ettercap, hachoir, hping, ideviceinstaller, ike-scan, ipv6toolkit, john, lft, libdnet, libimobiledevice, libnet, ...


1

Run Kali in a VM and get a supported USB 802.11 dongle and a USB ethernet adapter and forward both to the Kali VM. While stuff like aircrack-ng and Kismet might work on OS X, having a proper full Linux system makes pentesting a lot easier. Try it with stuff like VirtualBox!



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