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3

It is generally considered best practice to use an account that has no more privileges than are required. What this means generally is that you should use an account that has the lowest privilege level possible, and elevate your privileges when it is needed for a specific task that requires the higher privileges. However, this gets annoying rather quickly. ...


3

There's basically two things you need to do to secure your Mac from a (involuntarily) separated employee: Secure from outside access Change all passwords This is an overlapping approach because neither are 100% foolproof. However, if you remove as many of the access paths from outside the organization, whatever is missed will be covered by the changed ...


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Without your PIN, the thief should not be able to get any data from the phone. The ID in the phishing mail probably is just a wild guess, I got a few of those as well over the years.


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If one web app works and another doesn't you would probably need to contact support to determine if the problem is with your account or with Apple's infrastructure. Also, you will want to be sure you are really connecting to Apple sites (some computers and networks are compromised by malicious software). If you are connecting to a site that is imitating / ...


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security find-generic-password -ga <account> You can find the account by opening Keychain Access, opening the application password (titled Exchange) and looking at the Account field. It should be in the form emailaddress@server e.g. ‘username@example.com@mail.example.com’. Upon running this command, you will be prompted to allow access to the item ...


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You can reset your login keychain by opening Keychain Access from /Applications/Utilities and in Preferences selecting Reset My Default Keychain. Be aware of the statement shown beside the reset button.


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Once erased by the failed passcode attempts, the phone will be put in Activation Lock (assuming you have iOS 7 or later and have enabled Find My iPhone). You will need to unlock it using the Apple ID it is linked to. From there, you can restore the phone from a previous backup.


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There is only one root account on every OS X computer and it is disabled by default. It doesn't have a password and you can't login as root unless you specifically use Directory Utility and enable it. It's dangerous, because when logged in as root the system bypasses all authorization - it doesn't even ask for a password. In that aspect, an OS X computer is ...


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Let me see how your reasons would work or not: Admin accounts are not root. While true, they may be able to call sudo and perhaps they may even have the password ready for input (or sudo was configured not to ask for password). SIP (System Integrity Protection): This is only one layer which is not enough for all attacks. Can be disabled? Even better! ...


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You will lose the visibility of your services on other computers (i.e. Finder sidebar). If you don't have any sharing services running than it is of no consequence and would be equivalent of a firewall not allowing multicast traffic from your Mac. Because you did not completly disable Bonjour you will still benefit from seeing others on the network and ...


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You want to check out isight-cli, which basically changes the permissions on the necessary drivers as suggested here and here. isight-cli is based on original applescript isight-disabler.


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I think the easiest way to do this is to just not save your password to the networks you want to be asked to join.



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