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41

Finder -> Preferences -> Advanced


28

Search by Kind One of the most useful ways to narrow down a search is by using the kind: keyword. This allows you to restrict your list of results to a certain file format. For instance, if you type time machine kind:pdf, Spotlight will pull up only PDF files containing the words "time" and "machine". You can also limit your search to e-mail messages, music ...


16

Open a finder window Open the folder you wish to search in Click in the search box Type the text you want to find A dropdown should appear like the one in the image below which allows you to select the 'Filename contains' option If you've already run the search and want to alter the search to only look for files with your search term in the filename, you ...


13

I had exactly the same (but on Yosemite), and found this (https://discussions.apple.com/message/29693684#29693684) resolved it. Uncheck Use Safari Suggestions in the Search tab in Safari Preferences. Certainly not a solution to the problem, but gets around it until more concrete information comes out..


12

If you hold option the (+) button to add a search criteria will become a (…) and an Any/All/None block. Set this to None. For the criteria select Document Container. It won't be in the default list alongside Name, Kind, etc. Select Other… to select it from a list of additional criteria so long it has its own search feature: Set this to the name of the ...


12

Has your spotlight been botched? IN short, finder relies on spotlight to find things quickly. This will take a while (5 or so mins) and make your Mac go into "jump-jet" mode with the fans, but: Drop to terminal type in sudo rm -rf /.Spotlight-V100 then sudo rm -rf /.Spotlight-V200 then sudo mdutil -i off / then sudo mdutil -i on / finally sudo mdutil -E / ...


11

There are a variety of ways of searching for a file by name. I'd just open the Terminal and run locate xxxxxxxx-xxxxxxxx, although the locate index is only updated once a week, so if it's a new file it might not be listed. If you want, you can manually force an update with sudo /usr/libexec/locate.updatedb (you'll need to enter your admin password for the ...


11

Other than your Finder having jaundice, this should be a simple fix. The following command will clear the volumes local store and rebuild it if necessary; Open up Terminal and type: # sudo mdutil -E / You will be asked for your password, provide it, as this command requires administrator privileges to run. After confirming your Spotlight index will be re-...


10

In general, to search for something on a Mac, Spotlight is what's used and can be brought up pressing: Command (⌘)-Space bar Have a look at: OS X Yosemite: Spotlight keyboard shortcuts If in an application, like TextEdit as an example, pressing ⌘F brings up Find. Also have a look at: Mac keyboard shortcuts


8

It's already been answered, but here's my 2 cents. Via Bash through the terminal find ~ -type f -name '*pdf' or find ~ -iname '*pdf' (or, if you want to ignore error messages, find ~ -type f -name '*pdf' 2>/dev/null) or you can use this to search for a string in a file: find ~ -iname '*txt' | xargs grep 'string you want' This may not return ...


8

I looked at some of the saved search files in Finder's application bundle, and for example /System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app/Contents/Resources/MyLibraries/myDocuments.cannedSearch/search.savedSearch used a format like this for excluding directories: <key>FXScopeArrayOfPaths</key> <array> <string>~/</string> <...


7

It's not possible via spotlight (at least on Yosemite). You can only use finder. Start a search with Command+F. Click on the '+' icon on the far side of the taskbar Select the type from the 'kind' pull-down menu. Select 'other' and then find 'File extension' Enter your desired file extension and hit enter


7

I typically use TextMate: TextMate (1) is/was a buy product, but TextMate 2 is currently under active openSource development on gitHub and free to use.


7

You can provide multiple -type options with -o, such as -type f -o -type d in a single command. find . -name "*Xilisoft*" -type f -o -name "*Xilisoft*" -type d -o matches all parameters, so the -name is provided twice in the above command. Note that find can delete the results using -delete rather than -exec rm -rf {}.


7

This should work: mdfind "kMDItemDisplayName == test*.pdf" Enclose the pattern in single quotes and add 'c' to match case-insensitively: mdfind "kMDItemDisplayName == 'test*.pdf'c" Here is a list of available attributes. You can combine multiple attribute/value pairs with &&.


7

Just like you would with a Google search, use the double quotes operator to tell Preview the result must be an exact match. In your case, for example, typing "formation water" should yield the desired result.


6

Searching SMS messages was disabled due to battery life and performance concerns for the 3G, you can see this in the iPhone: Which iOS 4 software features does my iPhone support? article on apple.com http://support.apple.com/kb/HT4204 iPhone 3G does not support Spotlight search for SMS/MMS messages.


6

the query string is defined in : ~/Library/Safari/Configurations.plist.signed but the file is signed and cannot be edited without being replaced by safari. Also, it seems that every time you use this search bar, Safari hits This file on apple.com which can make one assume that Safari compares the 2 files and replaces the local one when needed. I think ...


6

You should use the strings application in the Terminal. strings filename(s) | grep text_to_search_for From Wikipedia: In computer software, strings is a program in Unix-like operating systems that finds and prints text strings embedded in binary files such as executables. I'm not aware of any way to use Finder to search for text in binary files.


6

I don't have an iPhone anymore, but my memory tells me this: iPhone Search using the standard search bar. The web search suggestions are at the top. The website search results of the currently viewed website are at the bottom. iPad Search using the standard search bar. The web search suggestions are at the top. To search the website use the entry ...


6

Just typing the operand NOT before the criteria will do the trick. So, in this case, typing NOT .txt will show all the files but the ones with the .txt extension.


6

Fire up Safari and check the settings for the default search engine. For me that is google and searching the way you described it for me opens safari (currently my default browser) with a google search. The option is right there on the first settings tab. I included an image detailing where to find it (sorry for the german):


5

I believe "Search in Google" is a Mac OS X service provided by Apple. Maybe since they don't know how to pass a webpage in parameter for every browser in the wild, I suppose they limited it to Safari. What you might try, is to develop your own Service, then go to System Parameters > Keyboard > Services Disable the "Search in Google" by Apple and ...


5

Yes, if you start typing, it'll select files/folders with what you type. The only difference between this functionality and Ubuntu's is that OS X's equivalent of this feature doesn't show what you're typing.


5

There are many extensions not listed on Apple's page. However, if they're not on the main page, they're not on Apple's site at all. Your cmd-f solutions is the best option if you want to search just the extensions that Apple has listed. If you want to broaden your search to more of the extensions available, turn to third-party sites: http://safariextensions....


5

I've not found a way to get Preview to search for characters like # or +, but Skim, an alternative PDF viewer (homepage here), is a good replacement/addition to Preview and is able to search more specifically. I've tested it and found it was able to find C++ (without needing any quotes/special options) without bringing up all C results. It was also able to ...


5

Search using the name: selector I've also become a big fan of the Found app. It's currently free on the app store and lightning fast (seems faster than LaunchBar to me - and that's saying a lot as it's a speed demon).


5

Yes, in both the iBooks and Kindle apps, you can search the full text (excluding text in images) of the book you are currently reading. Here's how to do that in each app: iBooks app While reading a book, tap the screen. A magnifying glass icon becomes visible in the top right, along with other controls. Clicking the magnifying glass icon brings up a ...


5

You need to escape your quotes like so: mdfind \"I love Apple\" -onlyin ~/Documents This results in just the one document being found: ~/Documents/test1.txt Without escaping them, I don't think the quotes actually get passed to the mdfind command, they're just interpreted by your shell to say that I love Apple is a single argument. With the backslash-...


5

The keyboard shortcut was changed to ⌃⌘F. If you open a window with ⌃⌘F, there is no indication in the UI that Finder is matching only filenames other than that the "Name matches" item in the suggestion list is selected: Finder should only match filenames even if you don't press return though.



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