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18

Appplescript & iCal Open Applescript and enter the following code: tell application "Finder" delete folder "folder" of home end tell Replacing folder with the folder you want to delete, and save the file. If the folder you want to delete is outside home directory, (for example the folder /Users) then replace the delete line with: delete folder ...


16

With the release of Mac OS 10.4, launchd was chosen to supersede cron in Mac OS. Here's a cached version of the launchd page from the Apple Developer Connection in 2005. It explains why cron was deprecated, as well as the benefits of launchd from Apple's perspective. The summary: launchd was created to not just replace cron but also init, xinetd for better ...


13

While KeithB's answer is correct, actually, cron is being deprecated in favor of the OS X specific launchd. Commands to be run via launchd are described in Apple "plists", or property lists, which are really just XML files: <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple Computer//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" "http://www.apple. ...


9

The wikipedia article on launchd has a very good summary, extended discussions as well as some great videos and external links for a deeper dive into this decision by Apple. In a nutshell, launchd replaces 7 major tasks and a boatload of scripts (inetd, init and rc and associated shell script structures, crond, atd, watchdogd, SystemStarter) with one much ...


8

You can run a cronjob using crontab. So basically, to run a cronjob, you will need to type nano ~/crontab in Terminal. This will create a new file called "crontab" in your home folder, and open up a simple text editor in Terminal. Type: * * * * * osascript ~/Desktop/theScriptToBeExecuted.applescript This will run an AppleScript named ...


8

The pmset terminal command should do what you want. The following will put the computer to sleep at 23:45:00 on December 2, 2014. The command must be run from an administrator account though: sudo pmset schedule sleep "12/02/14 23:45:00" (Edit: As far as I know, the MM/DD/YY date format cannot be changed; so, if you are used to a different format, use ...


6

Go to the terminal and execute "crontab -e" to add a new crontab entry. Now there are numberous syntaxical ways you can accomplish what you want (read about it on wikipedia). The easiest one, however, will be to put @monthly diskutil repairPermissions / in it. Note: You'll be using vi for editing. Press "i" to type, then after you've finished press ESC ...


5

Consider using DssW Power Manager. With Power Manager, you can create multiple separate start up and shut down times for weekdays and weekends. Power Manager goes far beyond the capabilities of pmset. How to schedule your Mac to shut down (screen recording on YouTube). Disclaimer: I work for DssW.


5

As you said that Time MAchine Editor didn't work fine for you then I search in web and find : TimeMachineScheduler it disables the automatic backup function of Time Machine and installs its own launchd daemon. Time Machine Editor (free software) allows you to specify a schedule for Time Machine to run. it changes the one-hour interval of Time Machine ...


5

You can schedule your Mac to wake from sleep or boot at a specific time. Go to System Preferences, then the Energy Saver pane. In there, at the bottom-right, is a "Schedule…" button. Pressing it brings up a sheet where you can set a day and time to wake up and another to go to sleep. If you leave a half-hour or so between the wake up and sleep times, it ...


5

By default there is no way of doing that with the options you have in the system preferences. But, you could do it from command line with a simple command: sleep 10; osascript -e 'tell application "System Events" to sleep' sleep 10 pause the execution of the following command for 10 seconds. If you want minutes or hours you must change 10 with number ...


4

EDIT: Although I am not certain of why cron fails to work for this specific use-case, this answer is superceeded by the (currently more correct) answer using launchd. Use crontab -e in the terminal application to add /System/Library/CoreServices/Menu\ Extras/User.menu/Contents/Resources/CGSession -suspend to the Crontab at the appropriate time, like so (for ...


4

There are 3 options I can think of, all of which rely on your setup/tools you have. For this, I am also assuming you are working with Mac servers. Apple Remote Desktop and Scheduled Tasks iCal and alarms the bash 'at' command. Apple Remote Desktop ARD will allow you to run tasks on remote machines, and they can be either done instantly or at a ...


4

You can also start Automator workflows with iCal if you just want something simple. Otherwise I would do it through launchd.


4

There are various mechanisms in Mac OS X to do scheduled tasks. They take a little bit of effort to configure, but this page explains it and has links to more info. The 'at' service, which was a bit easier to use, is deprecated as it wastes battery.


3

Hazel is a great app for doing this type of thing. It's not free, but it works great. I use it to "Label" or highlight files that are have been downloaded in the last 24 hours, then to delete files from my downloads folder that are more than 7 days old. I then have it empty my trash once a month. This is just the basics of what can be done with Hazel, ...


3

While I am sure its not a complete list (the only people who would have that would be Apple), here is a list I found on many of the phrases Siri understands: Adding Events Set up a meeting at 9 Set up a meeting with Michael at 9 Meet with Lisa at noon Set up a meeting about hiring tomorrow at 9am New appointment with Susan Park Friday at 3 Schedule ...


3

No - the admin user is the way that the system detects which accounts can modify a parental restriction either once or permanently. You'll need to not use or (have) an admin account or come up with some other social contact like setting up a recurring alarm that you voluntarily obey when the time comes to cease computing. Scheduling an automatic shut down ...


3

Print Job scheduling was removed in OS X 10.7 Lion. As a workaround, you can pause the printer, print what you want then continue the printer. You can provide feedback to Apple regarding this on the following page: http://www.apple.com/feedback/macosx.html


2

Make sure you have Calendar set for sharing in the System Preferences > Mail Contacts & Calendars > iCloud Confirm that System Preferences > iCloud similarly sets 'Calerndars' to share Login to your iCloud www page (or at least set it up); Select 'Calendar' from the WWW page; Pick the one Calendar you want to share from the left hand side of the WWW ...


2

You can use launchd to do this. Place the following xml into a new text file in ~/Library/LaunchAgents/ and call it something descriptive with a suffix of .plist. For example, mine is ~/Library/LaunchAgents/logoutAt1730.plist. <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?> <!DOCTYPE plist PUBLIC "-//Apple//DTD PLIST 1.0//EN" ...


2

You can print the StartCalendarInterval dictionaries with something like this: for h in {0..4}; do for m in {0,15,30,45}; do echo "<dict><key>Hour</key><integer>$h</integer><key>Minute</key><integer>$m</integer><key>Second</key><integer>0</integer></dict>"; done; done. You ...


2

You can do this with a combination of iCal, AppleScript, and Shell Scripting. First, open AppleScript Editor (/Applications/Utilities). Paste this in: tell application "Terminal" do script "diskutil repairPermissions /" end tell Go to File-> Save As. Select a safe but out-of-the way location. Set the File Format menu to Application. Then, open iCal. ...


2

I'd probably use a combination of a bash script and the 'at' command; if your tasks are generic enough you could build a small library of task scripts to pull from when you needed to run a job.


2

In Transmission go to the preferences uncheck System sleep under Network uncheck Quit with active transfers under General


2

I don't even know if cron has been deprecated. man crontab seems to indicate that it hasn't: (Darwin note: Although cron(8) and crontab(5) are officially supported under Darwin, their functionality has been absorbed into launchd(8), which provides a more flexible way of automatically executing commands. See launchctl(1) for more information.) Daemons ...


2

iCal can be used to run AppleScripts, launch applications, and perform tasks to a schedule. There are limitations to using iCal, but it is included with Mac OS X and relatively easy to set up. The limitations and a visual walk through on how to set up a scheduled AppleScript are included in the link above.


2

Use Carbon Copy Cloner instead. It uses the same underlying stuff as Time Machine. You can set a scheduled task for 2am that does an Incremental Backup with the "archive deleted or modified files" option checked. Here's what mine looks like... create something like this: Then click save task. It should look like this in the saved tasks window:



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