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11

Okay, I think I've tracked this one down. It isn't a problem with your iPod or iPad, it's a problem with the router itself. Its DNS has been overwritten so that it randomly (about 5% of the time) will redirect you to one of their sites. Because you're using someone else's open access point, there really isn't anything that you can do about it except to stop ...


8

Yes, using the Airport Utility you can turn off the router and WiFi functionality independently of each other. Under the Wireless tab - Network Mode: select Off Under the Network tab - Router Mode: select Off At this point you can connect the Time Capsule to the wired network using the ports with a horizontal icon <-> or even use it to receive the ...


8

A common fix for this is to make a new location under the Network pane in System Preferences. Open System Preferences. Click on Network. In the window that loads after that, near the top, is a drop-down menu labelled "Location:" Click on the drop-down menu and choose "Edit Locations..." In the next window that slides down click the + sign. A new line will ...


6

I know this thread is old, but I'd like to leave here what solved the problem for me. You need to check if you have the same security in both access points. For example, I had one access point secured with WPA/WPA2 and another with WPA2 only. After changing both to the same, everything was fine. To check your access points' security, you can do this: ...


6

Been there, done that. I found the source to my problem, but not something that might be a general answer for all with this problem. After exhausting the other answers here, I just started trying anything. What I discovered was that I have an external HD connected by firewire, and had it running when I rebooted after installing software. With the drive ...


6

Your issue is being caused by OS X's handling of a wi-fi parameter commonly referred to as roaming threshold. This parameter dictates the point at which an OS will switch to a stronger signal. Windows gives easy access to this parameter, example here, but no simple option exists in OS X. This document from NYU suggests OS X has "aggressive" roaming ...


4

There are LOTS of reasons for this not to work properly. First of all - don't rule out the router or the Macbook yet. They are both suspect until ruled out methodically. And we're far from ruling either of them out. :) Are you sure it's WPA-Personal? It could be WPA2. Check the router settings themselves, by plugging in to the router, and connecting to ...


4

The simple answer is buy an Airport Extreme Otherwise use the internet and read reviews. Virtually any draft-N or official N spec routers will 'work'. As with anything, the only way to be absolutely sure is to try them out.


4

Product description According to the datasheet, it looks like this device's share functionality does not work with Macs at all, since you need to install a driver to get USB-via-Ethernet support. From the footer of the last page of the PDF you link to: Minimum System Requirements Computer with: Windows® 76, Windows Vista®6, Windows® XP ...


4

Currently there is no way to jailbreak either an Airport Extreme or a Time Capsule. Whilst they are probably in the same order of difficulty as jailbreaking as say an iOS device, no one has really spent any effort on doing so. Personally I think this is probably for the following reasons: limited target audience (low numbers of product in the world) ...


3

ddclient is what I use on my Linux boxes. Works really well. You can find instructions details here: http://sourceforge.net/apps/trac/ddclient I think all you would need to do to get ddclient to run is to a @reboot line to your crontab and you’re set. crontab -e then add this line: @reboot /usr/sbin/ddclient -daemon 300 -syslog


3

Wireless is a complicated topic and you need to consult a speciality website like smallnetbuilder.com if you want to understand things like range, performance, and capabilities of different routers. The Apple Extreme/Express are more expensive, require an Apple utility that runs only on iOS/OS X/Windows, and are not the most feature rich. However, they are ...


3

Have you tried going to the Network preference pane in System Preferences, clicking on Advanced, then Wi-Fi, and deleting all the Preferred Networks? I seem to recall having the same problem a few years ago, and deleting the networks fixed it.


3

The correct form to add a net route is route add -net 10 $GW Obviously you have to replace $GW with the ip address of your gateway.


3

Going into keychain and deleting the entry for the wifi network solved it. Just connected to the network again and entered my credentials. There was something wrong with either the password (I doubt this) or the authentication mechanism that was somehow paired with the keychain entry. Anyway, this also means that going the manual way, as suggested by ...


3

Try this... Sharing your Internet connection - http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.5/en/8156.html Your mac will basically create a WiFi network for the iPad to join and then it will share traffic from the ethernet connector/PPPoE/cable. Your mac's buit in help might be newer than the link I provided, so check there first. Also, be sure you ...


3

Go with: 802.11g/n That setting covers the first generation iPad through to the latest iPad that got announced yesterday as well as the first generation iPhone through to the latest iPhone 4S. Your devices should pick the faster protocol (N) if they support it. If not, they'll use the slower protocol (G). But between G and N you've got just about all ...


3

I think you would be hard pressed to find a router that won't work correctly with the products listed. However, if you are concerned get any N router (non-draft) and you will be flying. As for features, I'd go for the cheapest router that supports a USB port (for connecting printers or scanners) and a few wired connections.


3

Unfortunately Apple based networks cannot be extended using non-Apple devices. Even though in theory it should work without any problems, Apple has restricted using 3rd party routers to extended wireless network, and vice versa, non-Apple based wireless networks cannot be extended using Apple routers. The workaround is to connect both, your Airport Express ...


3

Go to System Preferences > Network > Wifi Click on Advanced Remove the preferred networks from the list by using - button


3

Below is a network diagram based on what I have read thus far. I have made some assumptions about the IP numbering conventions, but that will have no effect on the overall scenario. I am assuming that you are using two different subnets rather than 2 different classes of networks. But, either way, you have two very different network IP addressing schemes ...


2

The newest OS X Server versions don't provide any tools to enable NAT/Routing in OS X. To get NAT working without using Internet Sharing you have to use a pf rule and create a plist to enable forwarding and load the pf rule: Below I assume en0: the interface connected to the cable modem and en1: the interface connected to the LAN. DHCP and DNS are set up ...


2

Properly done you can achieve this by prioritizing one interface over the other. Prerequisites: two different networks (physically and logically) e.g. Ethernet: 192.168.0.0/24 and Wi-Fi 192.168.1.0/24 assign static IPs to the ethernet adapters on the source(s) and the target(s) with a proper net mask. A default gateway is not needed. In System ...


2

install 10.11.2 update and see if that helps.


2

System Preferences -> Network -> Pick your Adapter -> Advanced -> TCP/IP Tab :) See screenshot here: Your computer's IP is marked "IPv4 Address" (192.168.1.74) and your router's IP is marked "Router" (i.e. 192.168.1.1 in my case).


2

From my experience, the easiest solution is to MANUALLY join the wifi network. Open the wifi menu and click "Join Other Network...". In pop-up dialog explicitly enter the network name, encryption method and password. That's it. Works every time in these situations.


2

Pretty much any new iOS based device, including the Apple TV etc, will happily use Wireless "n" (150Mb or even 300Mb). Practically nothing that you own will still use "b" (11Mb) - the only devices I have are Nintendo DS, and an ancient Palm organiser. Almost everything else you might have that isn't particular new, or isn't Apple kit, will support "g" ...


2

I was about to buy that app, but I'm a long time user of LogMeIn Free were from here (Denmark) I help my mum and dad as well plenty of friends with their computer related problems back in my home country (Portugal) LogMeIn Free was a fantastic as free solution, no hassle with proxies, routers or anything as it works with port 80 (http traffic). So I bought ...


2

I have had this issue with the D-link router at home from time to time. My solution was to set a static IP and manually enter the device's IP, subnet mask, gateway IP, and DNS server IPs manually into the device.



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