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7

First: the name "rootless" is misleading, since there's still a root account, and you can still access it (the official name, "System Integrity Protection", is more accurate). What it really does is limit the power of the root account, so that even if you become root, you don't have full control over the system. Essentially, the idea is that it's too easy ...


6

Back around 1990 I was working on a project with a guy named Tom. We were using a SUN server running SunOS (a Unix derivative, predecessor to Solaris). This was back in the days before CD drives and flash drives, so if you messed up the OS on your hard drive there was no way to recover. Tom used to routinely log in as root. I told him that was a bad idea, ...


1

Unless you're using backtrack/kali for a specific task: NO. Treat the super user as you would a loaded gun: if you have an immediate need and intention to use it: OK. If you can solve your problem in any other manner, however (e.g. "sudo"), do that.


0

NO! This will get your system broken into in a very short amount of time. Instead, su or sudo into root as necessary. If you absolutely, positively, must run as root, at least log out at any time when you're not using the computer. If your system is capable of running multiuser, but no users are configured, i suggest you create a privileged user (i.e: one ...


2

Just a few examples why it's not ok to always run as root: Root user can easily place files in locations that are far more difficult to track down. Root user has raw access to interfaces and so can put an interface into promiscuous or monitor mode and log ALL network traffic. Root user has raw access to device nodes and can thrash a disk making it far ...


4

In case the other reasons weren't good enough... Don't forget that you can't use Homebrew as root (which is actually a huge pain). Other programs also don't let you use them as root or run into permissions problems when you do, often times for no apparent reason, because their programmers assume that they won't be run as root. I think Steam is one of them. ...


13

Honestly, I agree that there are a lot of risks associated with using the root user as default. But let me just run through them and criticize some of the arguments a bit Defending against applications: Practically the permission system of *nix is not strong enough (by far) to allow running arbitrary programs. A malicious program on *nix is able to do ...


1

The root user password has to be set by you and they could be the same if you choose so, but it is not advisable to do that. From the Apple menu choose System Preferences. From the View menu choose Users & Groups. Click the lock and authenticate as an administrator account. Click Login Options. Click the "Edit" or "Join" button at the bottom right. ...


288

Using your computer logged in as root all the time is like always carrying around all your keys, your passport, $5,000 in cash, that piece of paper with all your passwords written on it and the only photo you have of Flopsy, the adorable rabbit whose death broke your seven-year-old heart. Oh, and a chainsaw. Which is to say, it's mighty convenient from time ...


8

Generally you want to keep ownership of your personal files separate from the root user. This is why you create a account for yourself as an administrator. The accepted way, under OS X, to gain root level access is to use the sudo command from the Terminal application. For example, if you want to see the partitioning of your internal drive the command is ...


17

You can, but it's a major security and stability risk. Doing so allows any application full access to your computer. You can't know what they're doing with that access. It's unnecessary, and just really unsafe. For a lot more background information on this, see Why is it bad to login as root Why not run always logged in as root Why it is not recommend to ...


1

It's a part of the software licensing service, Nalperion Unless you know what app you have that uses it for licensing, then maybe the simplest way to find out would be to kill the Nalperion service from Activity Monitor & wait til one app complains.



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