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11

Manually Cloning a Recovery Partition This process worked for me on an external USB drive, but I don't have a Firewire drive or encrypted partition to test with, but it should work for you. Requirements Existing recovery partition on your internal drive (or elsewhere). At least 650 MB of free space on your external drive (a previous version of this ...


11

I've always wondered the same thing: how to keep OS X from storing the WPA passphrase (or PSK) in NVRAM. Using 'nvram' I could never find the variable that I thought held these credentials. Today, I tried booting to a USB live image of Linux and running Chipsec. Its command to list EFI variables has many more results than I was getting by running nvram ...


6

I would head over to http://support.apple.com/kb/DL1433 and follow the instructions for making a USB Recovery drive. Also note if you hose your machine you can boot with Command-R to enter into recovery mode. Even if you hose your recovery partition, if you have an active Wifi connection, Apple will pull down the OS from the cloud.


5

An alternative method to the one described by Matt is to use Lion Diskmaker. Despite its name Lion Disk Maker is an application programmed with AppleScript that you can use with Mac OS X 10.6, 10.7 and OS X 10.8 to burn a DVD or build a bootable drive from Mac OS X Lion or OS X Mountain Lion Installation program.


5

Buy an enclosure kit from OWC or another vendor. Buy and put your SSD in the enclosure. Connect SSD/enclosure to your computer. Format the SSD with Apple's Disk Utility. Use SuperDuper! to copy your entire internal HD onto the SSD. Set startup to the SSD and boot from it to make sure it boots. Remove SSD from enclosure and install in MacBook Pro. Put ...


5

Yes, you can. Be sure to have a full Time Machine archive on an external device before you begin, and check your MBP meets the minimum system requirements before you buy. The Mountain Lion installer will create Recovery HD, if it doesn't already exist. In case you choose to do a clean install, which is quicker, import your account afterwards from the Time ...


4

This doesn't solve the question as it now stands from the OP, but it may be of help to someone who finds this page looking for a solution to this problem with a USB-mounted disk (as opposed to a FireWire one, as the OP now specifies). It would appear that this Apple Knowledge Base article does, in fact, answer your question: ...


4

Short answer: yes, it's because of FileVault (well, actually Core Storage, but that's required for FileVault). It's normal for the startup manager (Option key at startup) to only show one volume in this mode, but Command-R should still work to start in recovery mode. If Command-R is not working, I'm not sure what the problem there is. Long answer: starting ...


4

It has to download. In favor of saving space on your hard drive, the Recovery HD is 650 MB of various utilities including one to download and reinstall OS X.


3

The only sure way is to restore from your latest backup, which is why Apple added Time Machine for easy use. If you do not have that then the first thing to do is turn the machine off so that no more data is written to the disk. Then boot the machine off a recovery disk like Diskwarrior. If you are lucky then you can restore data if not the next step would ...


3

Unfortunately you cannot backup the Mac through the recovery partition. However starting the Mac in Target disk mode or booting the Mac from a bootable external drive may allow you to mount the iMac's drive and copy files from it.


2

The reason that the recovery partition doesn't work correctly, is that a Fusion logical volume group is not bootable (or at least not for the purposes of a recovery partition - a Fusion volume requires some kind of boot-loader to interpret the LVG). And if you create the fusion volume prior to installing Mountain Lion the recovery partition gets created ...


2

Using a USB Enclosure If you have a USB enclosure that you can put either the SSD or internal drive in, you can clone your internal to your SSD directly. It's a bit more efficient than pulling from the Time Machine backup. For full instructions, read this, but the short version is: Open Disk Utility Select your internal drive and click the restore tab. ...


2

Well, I was able to "solve" this in a round-about way. I used the recovery disk assistant with my MacBook Air to make a recovery SD card. With that plugged into my mini, I was able to successfully boot into it and the disk utility there was able to comprehend my fusion drive. That done, I then checked and saw that the recovery partition on the SD card was ...


2

It's actually possible to non-destructively add a recovery partition to a disk using Carbon Copy Cloner. From the Window menu select Disk Center and select the disk you want to add a recovery partition to from the list on the left hand side. The tab Recovery Partition on the right hand side should allow you to add the recovery partition. As already ...


2

I had a whole set of articles about it on my blog. http://www.dmitry-dulepov.com/2011/09/how-to-create-mac-os-x-lion-recovery.html http://www.dmitry-dulepov.com/2011/09/mac-recovery-partion-revisited.html http://www.dmitry-dulepov.com/2012/09/creating-os-x-recovery-partion-part-3.html For now I would recommend the last article as a way to go. The first two ...


2

They are hidden partitions in OS X. Showing all partitions in Disk Utility also shows the partitions in the list: …and diskutil list: 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS Mac SSD 150.0 GB disk0s2 3: Apple_Boot Recovery HD 650.0 MB disk0s3 They are usually not mounted by default and therefore not shown on the desktop ...


2

Snow Leopard does not have a Recovery HD. That feature was introduced in OS X 10.7 Lion. You can't create Snow Leopard recovery disks either — that requires Lion too. To create a bootable environment, you need to use the OS X installer. For this, you will need an install media to create the bootable partition. See: How can I download Snow Leopard?


2

Software Update checks and updates both your running Lion and your recovery partition, so that in the event of a significant security issue booting to the recovery partition won't instantly open you up to attack. (Compare booting unpatched Windows XP from DVD or a vendor recovery partition for recovery purposes; it has severe security issues fixed by ...


1

If it hadn't been 10.11 Public Beta (2) on the main volume, I would have advised to boot to Internet Recovery Mode (IRM) (altcmdR) or a bootable thumb drive (BTD), just delete the 3rd partition with gpt remove -i 3 /dev/disk0 and fully expand the main partition with Disk Utility. After rebooting to the main volume I would have reinstalled the latest OS X ...


1

You may use either the Disk Utility on your Recovery partition or the one on the main volume of your HDD to repair the SSD as long as the Disk Utility version is not too old. It's recommended to use a similar version of Disk Utility as the one installed on the volume to repair.


1

This sounds like the install you created is faulty somehow, possibly either a bad file copy or a bad flash drive. Things to try, in order: Rebuild the install drive using the same method you used before, but on a new drive. Use the built-in recovery options (hold cmd R) to do the install. Then, upgrade to the latest version of OS X. By upgrading to the ...


1

You can make a find command : sudo find /Volumes/YOUR_DD_NAME/* -name ".bashrc" -print; say finish It's working for me with my .zshrc Note that the command take a while, say finish is just more convenient ;)


1

Have a look at: OS X: Ports and hosts used by OS X Recovery In order to reinstall OS X using the OS X Recovery or Lion Internet Recovery, you must be able to connect to the Internet. If your computer is behind an external proxy server or firewall, your network administrator will need to ensure that you can resolve DNS for the following hosts and ...


1

Checking a virtual El Capitan Recovery HD trying to restore El Capitan with WireShark a lot more hosts are involved: swscan.apple.com sr.symcd.com s2.symcd.com osrecovery.apple.com oscdn.apple.com init.itunes.apple.com xp.apple.com buy.itunes.apple.com sb.symcd.com evsecure-ocsp.verisign.com osxapps.itunes.apple.com init-cdn.itunes-apple.com.akadns.net ...


1

Your computer is currently set to mount and show hidden partitions, which is unusual. To get control of this feature, you need to activate the Debug menu in Disk Utility which then gives you the option of viewing and mounting hidden partitions, or indeed, making them hidden again. In Terminal, run the command defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility ...


1

The disk giving you problems uses the GUID partition table (GPT) to define the its layout. You provided me with the relevant contents of this table when you posted the output from the command sudo gpt -r show /dev/disk0. These values appear to be correct, except for the entry with an index of 3. This entry is shown below. 480002496 1269536 3 ...


1

You can use Carbon Copy Cloner to create the space for the Recovery Partition if you are booted from another hard drive. The problem is that you will need a copy of to 10.7 Recovery Partition to copy into the space that Carbon Copy Cloner creates.


1

Hold down the Command and R keys at startup to start the computer from the Recovery system. The Recovery menu that appears includes the option to restore from a Time Machine backup. First: delete your SSD drive using Disk Utility. (Mac OS Extended (Journaled)) Second: Choose for Backup from TimeMachine. And now we wait... It would be wise to connect ...


1

OS X Internet Recovery Mac models introduced after public availability of OS X Lion include the ability to start up directly from an Internet-based version of the OS X Recovery system. OS X automatically uses this feature when the Recovery System on the hard disk isn't available (such as when your hard disk encounters an issue, or when your hard disk has ...



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