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As stated by patrix: the personal files of other user's on the same machine are generally stored in the /Users/<username> folder for each user. The permissions on these folders are usually set such that they are private to the individual who owns the files. This means you need to use sudo to elevate your own access levels in order to see their files. ...


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It's possible that the Reset Home Directory Permissions and ACLs option in the resetpassword tool will correct those permissions for you, though I'm unsure how 'deep' into your home directory it will reset. This blog post gives the steps for Lion, which appear to be the same in Yosemite (Note: that last link details instructions for resetting a password, ...


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Only because OS X offers a convenient way to repair permissions shouldn't be taken as an indicator that other operating systems don't need similar functionality as well. At least in the Linux world it depends on the distribution whether something similar is available and how it is run (e.g. periodically via cron). As for the "why is this required in the ...


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Windows does actually require equivalent permissions fixes, it's just that there is no built-in tool to do it all automatically. Analogous processes such as sfc /scannow etc or any of the suite of tools from tweaking.com provide easier user access to those underlying system tools.


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EDIT: The following is a partial solution. It will work at the shell level as expected but in Finder it can be bypassed with the if user is admin or knows the a admin user id & password. See comments below... Check the man page on chmod and you will find... The following permissions are applicable to directories: list List entries. ...


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sudo serveradmin settings smb:directorymask = 775 sudo serveradmin settings smb:creationmask = 775


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The home folders of all users are stored in /Users. Assuming you have the technical and legal rights to access files of other users, you can do this by changing into their home folder (cd /Users/joe or cd ~joe) and accessing the files there.



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