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3

Since I have a much newer system I couldn't accurately test with a 119 MB file as it took less then a second to copy in Terminal. So I created several much larger files, up to 2 GB, using dd and /dev/random as the source and made duplicates. I then rebooted and then did timed copies of each of the sets, one in Terminal and the other in Finder. This way ...


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Short answer: yes. Get the most memory you can afford. Long answer: my wife upgraded her 2009 macbook from SL to Mav just before yosemite came out. She also had only 4Gb and was running quite comfortably on SL. Mavericks was not. Quick inspection revealed lots of swapping. Installed two new 4Gb sticks (max'ing out the machine at 8Gb). Memory pressure ...


2

To answer this question accurately, you will need to get some statistics on how much RAM you are currently using. But in general, more RAM is going to improve things, especially if you're still on 4GB. On the other hand, the 2009 iMac is really reaching EoL at this point -- according to Mactracker, the support status for that machine is currently "Vintage". ...


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I have a very similar scenario to yours. I found this on Stack Overflow and it did the trick. Worth a try. Delete all files in /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration and force OS X to recreate new preference files.


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I used to experience this problem, until I upgraded to OS X 10.10.2. Now I can go for weeks without rebooting, and the window animations will stay smooth, and the WindowServer process will not use a lot of CPU.


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The answer is simple: after using your MBP for several hours, the Yosemite UI will become really sluggish. Try restarting your MBP. Does the UI seem a little snappier? Yosemite is simply not as optimized for UI speed as previous OS Xs. I have a 2013 13" MBPr.


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Beginning with Mavericks, Apple began using a different way of utilizing RAM called memory compression. That is why the used is so high. Wikipedia Virtual Memory Compression Two things you can do are to remove the contents of the saved application state folder in your user library and remove the swap files in the /var/vm/ folder at the root of your ...


3

Your key problem isn't the performance of your disk. Your key problem is the available space on your internal disk. 30 GB out 500 GB isn't enough for your kernel to breath. This is 6% of available free space. Everytime your kernel is pageing out a page of main memory, it will waste too much time to find tiny available holes within this 30 GB. Here is my ...


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I did the following for my Powerbook13" : Full RAM, 256GB SSD, step back to 10.8 if still possible. I did it for my MacMini core2 duo as well (quite tricky to change the HDD). It has been a rebirth for both...


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I would recommend backing up all of your data to an external hard drive or online and reinstalling OS X from scratch before buying an entirely new hard drive. You're doing a good job on routine maintenance, but after a certain point those only become stop-gap measures for an operating system that has only been upgraded on top of other upgrades (and so on), ...


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Here's what worked for me: if you've got a second screen attached, disconnect it, reboot, reconnect Close Google Chrome Still no good? Try this https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6623697


2

That's perfectly normal for Yosemite - the new rule is "empty RAM is wasted RAM." The system will fill the RAM so that any process needing to quickly use it has it already available, rather than having to request more. As you see from your pictures, the Swap file is zero, so nothing is being traded off to the hard drive. That's about as good as it gets - ...


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No I've just run an experiment to test this. I wrote and ran this Ruby script: puts "going to read foo" puts File.read('/tmp/foo.txt') sleep 5 puts "going to read bar" puts File.read('/tmp/bar.txt') sleep 5 puts "going to read baz" puts File.read('/tmp/baz.txt') After it started, I ran diagnose on its PID, as described above. I only saw one call to ...


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Since I upgrade my late 2009 iMac (4GB memory) to Yosemite, the system had not been performing well. It would be slow at time particularly after it had not been rebooted for a a day or more. In the Activity Monitor I noticed the it Image Capture Extension was steadily growing to become a major user of memory, and the memory pressure was in the yellow as the ...


1

"I would like to know if hard drive access speed is a bottleneck to my system currently." Of course! There are two aspects to a disk storage system: Bus speed Storage medium speed On ANY given bus, e.g., SATA, SATA2, SATA3, a mechanical HDD will be an order of magnitude slower than an SSD for a given link speed. The secret is to always use an SSD that ...


4

With Yosemite, we're noticing an somewhat, but not totally, subjective slowdown to all aspects of the OS, despite the minimum 4GB RAM. At our school we are actively replacing any faculty member's MBP's internal HDD with a SSD if they complain of 'slowness' and they can demonstrate it concretely. This can be in the form of a slow startup; slow-loading apps; ...


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Here are two things to check. 1). Do you have any encryption on your WiFi network? If so, I would recommend changing the password/key and using one that is at least 16 characters long and contains at least three of the four types of characters (lower case letter, uppercase letters, numbers, and special characters like "!", "@", "#", "$", "%"...). One ...


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As SSDs age, it takes more and more work for them to store data. This is only made worse by having less than 1GB of space available. In my experience (with a 2010 Macbook Air, with the 250GB SSD), performance GREATLY improved when I had >10% free space. Do what you can to give your computer some breathing room! Delete some files now! Here's a classic ...


1

First: Make sure you have an up-to-date backup. Assuming no hard drive issues, this Sounds like Spotlight is having problems indexing. I have also seen slow app launching due to bad font caches. I assume that you have let the system run for a while so that Spotlight can have a chance to update its databases. This can take a while, although on a ...


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Intel is making big improvements in the Integrated Graphics performances. They are actually taking a portion of the Nvida market in doing that. To Intel, the Nvidia is just a parasite, so if they can do better with the iGPU performance, ppl wont need it. Intel will be introducing next gen CPU with some powerful iGPU in 2015. There is no official ...


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Actually, I have heard anecdotal evidence that removal of the battery does cause the system to throttle the CPU under certain circumstances. I also believe this can cause the kernel task to "absorb" the theoretical CPU capacity that would be there if it were running at full frequency. The steps to isolate this would be to monitor the internal temperatures ...


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Each Firewire controller will be treated independently by OS X, and each controller will have its bandwidth set by the slowest device connected. So you could daisychain your devices but will only see 400Mb/s throughput, requiring you to use separate Firewire adapters if you wish to see your OWC drive running at full speed.


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One troubleshooting step is to see which files are being modified while kernel_task is consuming 500% CPU. In Terminal: sudo fs_usage -f filesys You will see a lot of files fly by. Just scroll up to get an idea of what files are being written or read.


1

for me, the culprit was using Yosemite's new system wide dark mode (Systemsettings->General->use dark status bar and dock). Switching back to bright mode reduced the load of WindowServer for me from >100% to 2-7 %. So if you enabled that, check for that. ;-)


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Thunderbolt 2 supports data rates of up to 20 Gb/sec. The newest SATA spec, V3.2, only does 16 Gb/sec. There should thus be no difference in performance between an internal SSD (connected via SATA) and an external SSD (connected via Thunderbolt).



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