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3

There's been much debate and discussion around this topic. I believe it was beneficial for iOS back in the v3 and v4 days but now it's not. Craig Federighi even came out recently saying it's not necessary and it doesn't increase the battery life. Apple has built-in their memory management the proper time to suspend and/or kill an app when necesssary. The ...


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So... A bit of poking lead me to a simple conclusion: it's unlikely Apple will tell you where they use AES-NI instructions within Mac OS or the rest of their software, but they are definitely present and available. Firstly, Intel talks a bit about AES-NI and where it is used. Some of the comments talk about its presence or lack there-of in the comments. ...


1

If your Mac isn't a corporate managed machine I'd go for uninstalling the Tenable Security Nessus software. Others might have a different feeling about this but you don't need additional security software on OSX. We run a Mac-only office for years and the only additional security thing we stick with is the 'Little Snitch' firewall app. I wouldn't have a ...


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In one circumstance, a force quit can have a benefit to iOS that outweighs the cost of more processing needed to clean up the process, restart it, and purge any files that are cached/open. The negative to doing this is that apps don't run in the background - so once you switch to a new app or the springboard / list of icons / lock screen - iOS has already ...


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The first thing you want to do is reference the drive specs to see what it is rated in terms of data transfer speed. According to C/Net, it has an external data transfer rate of 300MBs (it's a SATA drive, so this is expected) So, if you are getting a drive speed rating of 50MB/s, things are definitely slow. 5400 RPM is also quite slow to begin with. ...


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I do not know which program you used to generate the output in the screenshot, but assuming it outputs the ordinary figures such as for example Activity Monitor or top would do - the reason for the seemingly erraneous swap usage is simply one of time. Imagine that a process on your Mac allocates 12 GB of RAM. The system hasn't got 12 GB of free RAM, so it ...


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This is all anecdotal, tested using a sample size of 2, so barely counts as experiment... Restart the Mac, it's been up 12 days. That would be fine for a machine with a lot of RAM, but it's going to hit a low RAM machine harder. I'd say the simple solution would be to double the RAM. Two of the machines here are always on, the one with only 10GB RAM used ...



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