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Looks like a disk problem, dying. In the Recovery Partition (start while holding CMD+R), start DiskUtility do Repair Disk. Even when the issue is gone after that, prepare to have the disk replaced.


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I found another solution. It may take time though. You need to try reinstalling windows by using bootcamp and then uninstall it. When you ask bootcamp to delete the partition used for windows, it will also "delete" the free space. It worked for me.


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ran into the same problem and found this article that fixes it a little easier Just run diskutil coreStorage list, find the logical volume uuid, and then run diskutil coreStorage revert (that uuid) in your case diskutil coreStorage revert 2F7B1893-07E8-4194-840B-F2552042E055 http://awesometoast.com/yosemite-core-storage-and-partition-woes/


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Basically you have to delete the linux partitions (disk0s4 and disk0s5) and then expand your CoreStorage volume (Macintosh HD) to the full size. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing altcmdR while booting Open Terminal in the menubar -> Utilities enter diskutil list and diskutil cs list to get the partition and the CoreStorage listing. Now unmount all ...


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Update 2 Based on the current state of your MBR and GUID partition tables, I recommend the following steps to finish fixing your computer. I do not think it is necessary to boot to Internet Recovery Mode before entering these commands. Make a Time Machine or other form of backup. (Just in case.) Execute my Update 1 on /dev/disk0. Upon completion, the ...


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Thanks to @tubedogg for linking me to this post and giving me the tips. To fix the issue I had to run the commands diskutil cs revert <disk id> and diskutil cs resizeStack (Not sure if that worked since I think it game me an error). I had to reboot for the effects to change and I partitioned my drive in recovery mode (think you can do it within OS X ...


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You need to buy a new drive onto which you will copy your data from the borked drive. Preferably, this new drive will be a brand other than Seagate, which has the worst failure records in the industry. Once you have safely copied your data to the new drive, you can then begin to worry about how to deal with the Seagate drive.


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You can try following these steps: run the following command in Terminal: diskutil list Find your disk label in the "NAME" column, and note the identifier all the way on the right (something like "disk#s#") Now run this command: diskutil unmount MISC Next run: sudo mkdir /Volumes/MISC && sudo mount -w -t exfat /dev/disk#s# /Volumes/MISC replacing ...


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You will not be able to split your drive into more than two partitions and still be able to boot Windows. There is a hard limit on the number of partitions on the boot drive for Windows (may be for Mac and Linux too, not sure). You can certainly dual boot Mac and Windows (or Mac/Linux) but not all three on one drive. If you follow the instructions in ...


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Run the following command in Terminal: diskutil cs resizeStack ACA4133B-5F31-4D66-B502-4EABED4E2958 5E6D00FD-4BAD-424C-92CF-F8080CCC2C95 3.128t The first UUID is your LV UUID, the second is the PV UUID that you want to grow (incase I mistyped one of them). This will grow your disk back to fill up your 3TB disk. You may have to reduce that number to 3.1279t ...


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From the Tom's Hardware Forum: By default, the OSX disk utility creates a new partition as GUID. Windows can't read it. You need to create the partition type as MBR, which Windows can read. Then format as exFAT and both machines will read it.


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You may use some third party tools like Paragon-NTFS. It installs a driver on the Mac side that reads the NTFS partition of your Windows side. Some years ago I used the free "FUSE" drivers, but it seems to me, the development has stopped. http://www.paragon-software.com/home/ntfs-mac/index.html Another solution would be to use a USB thumb drive, which is ...


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I have solved this after two days of searching around the Internet. I am using MacBook Pro 15" retina, with another partition having Windows 8 created by Boot Camp in Mac. The question, when I run disk utility I don't see the "draggable" corner of the hard disk which I need to resize. This is my solution, I will write down step by step: Turn off the ...


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diskutil cs revert turns off the Core Storage volume manager for that volume. The Yosemite installer turns it on in case it's needed later (mostly for FileVault), but if you don't actually need it (e.g. for FileVault a Fusion disk) it doesn't do anything useful. If you aren't using FileVault or a Fusion disk, what Core Storage mostly does is confuse Disk ...


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If you zero out the drive, it means that you've completely erased the drive, partition map and all. The partition map tells the OS how a drive and its' space is used, and in order to use one to install and OS to or store data on, it needs at least 1 partition. If you've used OS X's built in Disk Utility "Erase" function, it asks for a new name to rewrite the ...


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As a followup, I updated my 2011 MacBook Pro (not my Mac Pro) using an aftermarket SSD in December of 2014. Drive Selection Balancing budget vs performance vs reputation, I chose a Crucial M500 480GB — not a known high-performer, but with a decent reputation for reliability. I’m not sure the power loss protection capacitors are needed in a laptop, but I ...


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More people have problems with BootCamp trying to partition manually than any other way. This is what I would do: Boot into recovery mode. Get into disk utility Delete the partition you created for Windows Expand your Mac partition all the way into the available space Now (assuming you already have the BootCamp media created) Run the BootCamp.app and ...


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Your internal disk is a Fusion Drive combining an SSD (disk0) and a HDD (disk1). It uses a Core Storage partition scheme. The superior "Macintosh HD" is the name of the Logical Volume Group build by the compound of the two Physical Volumes (disk0s2/disk1s2) of your Fusion Drive. It's used instead of the name of the physical device in a non-Core Storage ...


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The reason it shows three "Macintosh HD" drives, is because it's trying to obfuscate the "CoreStorage" partitions you're seeing with the command you used. It helpfully (or not so much) tells you what volume those CoreStorage volumes are a part of (in this case "Macintosh HD"). Then it also shows you the mounted "Macintosh HD". The EFI partitions are required ...


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disk0 EFI is the partition with the EFI specifics of this mac disk1 is the Recovery Partition disk3 is your startup disk partition. So you start from disk3, you can use the RecoveryPartition to "recover" (start up while holding CMD+R) You can not access the EFI partition. LexS


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Your main disk uses a Core Storage partition scheme: disk0 is your main system disk. disk1 is a "virtual" disk residing in disk0s2 containing the Macintosh HD volume visible on your desktop. The first two sectors of a Logical Volume contain zeros only. Examples: disk2 is the Core Storage Volume pooling disk0s2 (SSD) and disk1s2 (HDD) of a 3.1 TB ...



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