New answers tagged

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You can use Unetbootin to copy the Linux ISO to 1.2GB partition(disk4s3). If I were you though I would first rewrite the partition type as GPT instead of APM by running: diskutil partitionDisk disk4 GPT fat32 Linux 10% ExFat d2 10% ExFat d3 80% Then select the Linux partition on disk4 in UNetbootin to be the destination for the ISO copy.


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I eventually made a call with Apple support. They asked me to use the option first aid in Disk Utility, this didn't help. They then asked me to reboot my iMac in recovery mode and do the same thing again. This also didn't help. After these two options to repair my partition, they asked me to back-up whole drive and reinstall OSX. They told me that this ...


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In my case, I had already disabled FileVault on my primary partition to allow Boot Camp Assistant to resize the primary partition to accommodate a BOOTCAMP partition, but after manually deleting the partition, Disk Utility couldn't (wouldn't?) resize the primary to max while it was mounted to filesystem root. I rebooted to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing ...


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Your computer uses two partition tables stored on your internal drive. The first is the Master Boot Record (MBR) partition table and the second is the GUID Partition Table (GPT). You used the commands fdisk and gpt to print out most of the contents of the MBR partition table and GPT, respectively. For the most part, Windows (booted via BIOS) ignores the GPT ...


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I have made a fork of fuse-ext2 which installs everything in /Library and /usr/local, so that you don't have to disable SIP in Mac OS X El Capitan. Glad if you try it ;-).


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To most easily resolve this, you need to erase your USB drive with a "Master Boot Record" scheme. Steps: Open Disk Utility Select the USB drive Click "Erase" Choose Format "MS-DOS (FAT)" MOST IMPORTANT: Choose Scheme "Master Boot Record" Click Erase button Many thanks to nholtappels for figuring out the problem!


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Alright, I fixed it. I installed a Live image to my flash drive and copied the TestDisk software to it. My live image was Windows 10 To Go, but I believe any OS could handle it. Then, I ran a scan using TestDisk, and re-enabled the "deleted" partitions. After doing this, I wrote the new GPT to disk, and rebooted. Held the option key, and the partitions ...


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The problem is not that you don't have an MBR. The problem is that an MBR can only have 4 partition entries. On an out-of-the-box fresh install of OS X, you'd be using 3 of those partition entries already; one for the EFI partition, one for the Mac HFS partition, and one for the recovery partition. That leaves only one MBR slot available for the Boot Camp ...


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FIX WITH ACCESS TO SHARED PARTITION To get Windows to boot, you can try entering the following in gdisk from OS X. Before entering the command, you will have to disable System Integrity Protection (SIP). If Windows boots, you will be able to access the new shared partition from Windows. If Windows does not boot, follow the instructions in the section titled ...


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I got it to work by using gptsync (downloaded from here). When I booted into recovery mode, I could open the terminal and run ./gptsync /dev/disk0. This created a hybrid MBR/GPT and allowed me to install Windows.


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You show in your posted image that the partition is encrypted. I was unaware a partition could be encrypted without using core storage. Anyway, I believe the correct command to fix your drive is given below. sudo diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 R The command should move /dev/disk0s3 to the bottom of disk0 while resizing /dev/disk0s2 to maximum ...


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Try to return everything back: diskutil resizevolume disk0s2 R and then: diskutil resizeVolume disk0s2 480G jhfsx InstallOSX 10G Resizing a volume that is currently set as the computer’s startup disk will invalidate that setting; use the Startup Disk System Preferences panel or bless (8) to reset the resized volume as the startup disk.


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At first: umount -f "/Volumes/Recovery HD" Then: sudo asr adjust --target /dev/disk0s3 -settype "Apple_Boot"


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This is really terrifying that the only answer suggest to overwrite your gpt table. The correct and safest solution, with explanation, is from this comment. download GParted-Live CD from http://www.gparted.org/download.php boot from this CD accept the suggestion to enable the full disk reboot from mac OSX try again – now you can resize it! Explanation: ...


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diskutil erasevolume "Free Space" "" /dev/disk0s4 diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 R The first command will remove partition /dev/disk0s4. The second command will move /dev/disk0s3 to the bottom of disk0 while resizing /dev/disk0s2 to maximum size.


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The command diskutil mergePartitions HFS+ Name disk0sx disk0sy will merge all disk slices from disk0sx to disk0sy while only data on the first disk partition in the command (i.e. disk0sx) won't be erased. In your case disk0s2, disk0s3 and disk0s4 will be merged into disk0s2. Consequently you will lose your Recover HD partition. If the volume name contains ...


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Moved bootloader (EFI folder) to EFI partition and everything started to work properly


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I booted into Internet Recovery Mode, erased the entire hard drive, and re-installed Mac OS X. This will reinstall the OS that came with the computer, recreate EFI and Recovery Mode partitions, and set CoreStorage volumes as if everything is set from factory defaults. After this Recovery Mode works as expected.


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Hold down the Command ⌘OptionR keys at startup to boot to OS X Internet Recovery. Once you have started your Mac in OS X Internet Recovery mode, you need to use the gpt command to remove the unneeded partitions. You can then expand your core storage partition to recovery the freed space back into your OS X partition. To use the gpt command, you need to ...


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No need to navigate out of current folder, just enter the fdisk command without the sudo, i.e. : fdisk -e /dev/disk0 This will hopefully work, don't be worried if you get a message about MBR not accessible, you should be under the fdisk command prompt, enter 'p' you should then see all your partitions. Among those partitions you should see one named ...


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Remove all external disks (just for safety reasons). If possible also remove all internal disks except the boot disk or "refresh" your backups. The proposed command (dd) used improperly can be deadly for your data. Open Terminal.app and get the disk identifier of the disk containing the DVD partition: diskutil list Unmount the disk: #replace diskX by ...


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As far as I know you CAN use BOOT CAMP to create a USB stick with the neccessary drivers from a Windows ISO without having to partition or format your HDD ... at least with Booot Camp 6 it should also have a EFI boot on the USB stick. So simply use Boot Camp for creating a USB installation medium and then BOOT FROM IT WITHOUT USING BOOT CAMP TO PARTITION ...


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Your CoreStorage Logical Volume Group is missing a Physical Volume with the UUID DDD40234-2DC7-44B2-BE95-D9C0FA46F96A. Your internal drive probably is (or worse: was) a Fusion Drive and the SSD part is missing. The SSD is either damaged or has to be reseated, if it doesn't show up entering diskutil list or if it shows up: the internal structure of the LVG ...


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I don't expect that you're going to find apps that you can run since everything in the EFI partition is presumably dealing with the hardware directly and doesn't conform to a UNIX/BSD/OSX application model. Instead, it is a bit of a mini-OS that has enough drivers to support booting from various devices (disk, USB, network, etc.) before handing control over ...


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If you format the BOOTCAMP partition as MS-DOS (FAT), then you should be able to use the Boot Camp Assistant application to remove the partition. If this fails, then commands can be entered in a Terminal application window to remove the partition. I will not post these commands unless necessary.


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I encountered the same problem as you and also couldn't change the partition when using Terminal. I managed to go around that by using Recovery Mode. To access Recovery Mode, restart your Mac while holding the ⌘ Command+R keys during the boot process, before the Apple logo. Once there, in the menu bar, open Utilities > Terminal and use the fdisk commands. ...


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From Terminal: diskutil eraseVolume exFAT AAA disk0s4 where AAA - name of the new exFat partition, which you can delete in Disk Utility


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Try to use Single User Mode to repair the disk. Restart your mac holding command + S Wait until you see small # sign. Type fsck -fy You should see The volume (name of the volume) appears to be OK If not - keep repeating the same command Hope that helps ;) UPDATE To change a volume you can try to: # cd /Volumes/"Name of Volume" in your case ...


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You have not actually installed Windows. Your image shows the BOOTCAMP partition is MS-DOS (FAT) formatted. If Windows installed, the partition would be NTFS formatted. At some point during the installation, did you tell Windows to format the BOOTCAMP partition? See step 4 here and "Format the Windows partition" step here. If you skip this step, you will ...


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In Disk Utility find the HDD you are trying to format in the left hand column. Select the disk and not the volume - that appears as child under it - to repartition it. Just choosing the volume erases or replaces the file system but not the partition table type. This may apparently fail if the partition map is mal-formed. If you feel confident with ...



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