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6

If I understand your question correctly you are trying to resize the volume group or actually one of the volumes within a group. From what I could gather your disk was converted to a CoreStorage Volume. Could you please verify that by issuing the following command in a terminal and check if you get a similar output to the one in the picture: diskutil ...


5

This is how to fix the bootcamp windows install error: "Windows could not update the computer's boot configuration." Do not try to fix with a workaround - you'll find solutions of people manually selecting their Windows partition during reboot by holding down the OPTION key. This will work, but you are circumventing the way that apple wanted you to install ...


5

Yes you can repartition without losing data. Using Disk Utility, perform a repair on your drive to make sure the drive is free of errors (even better, use Diskwarrior if you have a copy). Then unmount your drive but don't eject it. Select the drive in the left hand pane, then go to the Partition tab. On the Partition Layout section click on the "+" to create ...


4

The Mac hardware stores the boot volume in NVRAM so you could power off the computer and then reset things by holding the Command Option P R keys down. Once you've heard two boot chimes you can release things and if the Mac OS X volume is viable it will boot first. If that doesn't work then it's likely that the OS X volume has issues and the system is ...


4

According to this page: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH11102 If the Encrypt checkbox is available, you can select it to keep your backup disk secure. If the Encrypt checkbox is dimmed, your backup disk doesn’t support encryption. Encryption is available only for Time Capsules and for partitions or disks attached directly to your computer and ...


4

I also asked on the developer forums and got an answer there (iOS/OS X dev account required to view). The solution was to boot into a recovery partition (⌘ + R), and change the boot disk from the Apple menu. It needed to be changed to my Mavericks install instead of my Yosemite install.


3

You can't use filesystem commands (cp, mv, ls, etc.) on devices (/dev/*). If you want to copy everything, bit-for-bit, from volume to volume, you'll need an app like Super Duper or Carbon Copy Cloner.


3

It is definitely possible to partition a single drive into two partitions and have separate encrypted Time Machine backups on each partition for your two individual Macs. The only downside is a single point of failure since there's a single physical drive used for two machines. If anything goes wrong with that disk, both the Macs would be left without ...


3

I've struggled for some days with the same problem but now it is solved. The problem was a faulty SATA cable. I've replaced it with a new one and now everything works as expected.


3

Yes! As the disk is the correct format, it will show in the disk list in the installer (click Show All Disks). You can install any version of OS X on a partition of the correct format, regardless of where the partition is located. The OS X installer doesn't partition the disk for you though; do this first in Disk Utility.


3

You seem to have found your way to fdisk. Keep in mind that its editing features have no real safeguards against accidentally using erase (which removes all the partitions) or editing a partition that Mac OS X is currently using, and also few safeguards against even entering numbers that don't make any sense, so be careful. You can use fdisk in interactive ...


3

You can use diskutil cs list to show the core storage view of things. Once you have the logical volume UUID for the disk in question, you can use diskutil cs deleteVolume to clean up the reserved space that was allocated to the encrypted data and filesystems. That would allow you to surgically remove the core storage. You could also unmount the filesystems ...


3

This is getting increasingly harder over time. Instead of creating a bootable Linux partition, I find it much easier to simply install virtualBox and create a Linux virtual machine instead.


3

I also have this issue... MacPro, 3TB drive (Seagate). I have to use the terminal: diskutil list diskutil unmount /dev/disk22 diskutil eraseDisk HFS+ "Macintosh HD" /dev/disk22 etc etc to utilize this drive correctly. (Sorry for all the commands. Posting them just in case it helps someone. Though anyone using those commands better know what they do ...


3

A virtual install of OS X Lion runs without issue on Mavericks. All the popular VM software understand Lion as an OS and should let you install it. I don't see you having any problems with this setup as long as your hardware is Mac.


3

I have never, and I mean never, even back to the "classic" Mac O/S days (going back to system 6) partitioned a drive into smaller chunks. Performance gains were supposedly about different parts of a rotational drive being faster than others (EG quicker seek to sectors near the physical hub). There may also have been some O/S speed gains in some O/S if you ...


2

I had a similar problem. I created a 30 GB partition and after deleting it there was unused space. I couldn't manually get the original full partition back because of disk errors. So I booted into Recovery (Command + R), repaired the disk with Disk Utility and then the resize to original was no problem. Rebooted and now back to normal. Had no need to ...


2

Your partition table does not know about the larger hard drive yet. While Disk Utility also queries the hard disk size and lets you request it to enlarge your partition, it will fail when finally changing the partition size (after doing a file system check). This can be solved on different ways: One is to destroy the GPT (partition table) and recreate it ...


2

Here's what I would do: Backup your full disk (all partitions) to an external disk using Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper. Copy your home folder back to the main partition (to /Users) using "Paste Exactly": in Finder, go to your home folder on /Volumes/Data HD, select Edit → Copy from the menu, go to /Users (still in Finder), open the Edit menu, hold ...


2

Time machine will use "up to" all the partition. So at the beginning there is going to be free space remaining. This free space will lessen with the time. When the partition is full, TimeMachine will delete the oldest backups. So yes I would suggest a partition and yes the Disk Utility will allow you to partition your hard drive with a low probability of ...


2

If there is anything in iTunes that you want to backup, you should buy an additional drive instead. You don't want to have both the data and the backup on the same physical drive. Personally, I'd get another drive rather than mess around with repartioning drives that are not backed up.


2

Sounds like you started to overwrite the drive. The data is probably still recoverable, but, as Graham said, you don't want to do anything to the drive until you attempt to recover the files. A few options: While I haven't used it, PhotoRec looks like a good option, if you are comfortable with the command line. Despite the name, it can recover all sorts ...


2

OS X Mavericks requires at least 8 GB of free space to install to. At least 15% of free space is recommended for updates and other such things. Therefore, the minimum space for OS X is 9.2 GB, or to be safe, 10 GB. So yes, using Disk Utility to partition before you installed Boot Camp would have meant that you could have made the OS X partition smaller. ...


2

The partition has to be formatted NTFS. Special set ups like this are better done manually, not with bootcamp. Format the partition NTFS, then startup with your windoze disk and try to install it to the USB drive.


2

This is what I found to work: Create USB stick using Apple Bootcamp Assistant (and keep it in your machine for the duration of the installation). Follow the entire process (including specifying the size of your Windows partition). When Bootamp Assitant reboots your machine you need to interrupt the installation by holding option until you get a choice of ...


2

It can be done if you get your mind outside OSX-BootCamp box mentality. On new formatted HDD install fresh your OS X, install what you may need in it. Via boot camp create a second partition for W7 or W8, create your installation with apple drivers using an external USB flash drive and your iso image of W7 or/and W8. 3.Shrink to a clearly defined size your ...


2

You can use the same folder for Mac and Windows versions of iTunes. I would recommend use the exactly same version though. Here is more info on how use it through the network: http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20070424081346722. It's the same logic, but you will be using the same local folder instead a network shared one.


2

If your partition turned into Logical Volume Group (you can't resize or delete Yosemite partition), you can revert partition type with few command line. Open Terminal type "diskutil corestorage list" Find Yosemite partition UUID string. type "diskutil corestorage revert " Your Yosemite partition is now revert to default partition type. Now, you can resize ...


2

iPartition For all my partitioning, I use and recommend iPartition. It will allow you to resize partitions without deleting any data. It also works for Boot Camp volumes and other PC disks. With iPartition, resizing a partition is as simple as selecting it, grabbing the resize handle and dragging. Not only that, but if you have several operations to ...


2

This requires the three partitions between the selected one and the intended one to be moved. Disk Utility can't do this without destructively destroying and recreating the partitions in the intended location, removing all data from the partitions. You will need third-party software such as iPartition. For more information, see Partitioning Software.



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