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11

After gaining some experience with CoreStorage volumes, I reworked my first answer to generalize and facilitate it by adding some scenarios and deleting some dispensable steps. Basically there is one undocumented command to resize or expand a CoreStorage volume group and an inherent logical volume: diskutil cs resizeStack LVUUID size The command ...


9

I had the same issue since the beta and the official release did not solve this issue. In the terminal I had the following output: diskutil list /dev/disk0 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *251.0 GB disk0 1: EFI EFI ...


9

To be able to create a multi-boot environment you have to revert from a CoreStorage partition layout to a standard partition layout. Start to internet recovery mode by pressing altcmdR while booting. Open Terminal.app in the menubar Utilities → Terminal enter diskutil cs revert LVUUID and hit the ⏎ key. (LVUUID is the Logical Volume UUID. You get it by ...


8

The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is vastly undocumented and as such potentially destructive. There might be an easy way outlined first and a long winding, time consuming hard way. Please backup your Mac OS X before proceeding. The not-as-long-as-expected way: A 2nd computer or an iPhone with the stackexchange credentials to enter the site ...


7

Quick fix: Fake Bootcamp. "I partitioned the free space (that OS X couldn't use) as MS-DOS, Bootcamp Assistant thought it was Windows, and was able to remove this MS-DOS partition and restore Mac OS to a single partition." This is the easiest solution, so try that first. No luck? Long fix: In my case, I couldn't get Disk Utility to create the ...


7

I am astonished about complexity of this problem (see @klanomath answer) and easiness to create it. That's why I tried to play with it and found a work around. My problem was the following: I had 500GB-disk. I created 150GB-Macintosh-HD partition on this disk using Disk Utility, leaving 350GB as a "free space". When I tried to format the free space into ...


5

Theoretically everything is fine with your Fusion Drive. Fusion Drives look like this. Disk0 is your SSD with 121 GB and disk1 is your HDD with ~1 TB (~1.121 TB summed up). The larger parts of your SSD (disk0s2) and your HDD (disk1s2) are pooled to a CoreStorage LVG (Fusion Drive: disk3) with a size of 967.8 GB. The rest is reserved for EFIs, a Recovery HD ...


4

The Mac hardware stores the boot volume in NVRAM so you could power off the computer and then reset things by holding the Command Option P R keys down. Once you've heard two boot chimes you can release things and if the Mac OS X volume is viable it will boot first. If that doesn't work then it's likely that the OS X volume has issues and the system is ...


4

It seems that i did it using this post Unable to Resize Partitions and your comment. Although it wasn't obvious for me, what I did was this: diskutil corestorage resizeStack LOGICAL_VOLUME_UUID 0G 0G to expand it to the maximum available space that is free. diskutil corestorage resizeStack can provide with info.


4

Are you aware of this thread at Apple Support Communities? https://discussions.apple.com/thread/6601122 According to this, Yosemite changed the way the Recovery Partition works when you have Core Volumes. It no longer shows in the list of drives when you boot with the option key pressed. The way to do it is by pressing Command-R. I don't have Fusion ...


4

This Mac Book Retina was originally delivered with Mountain Lion. The upgrade history contains Mavericks, several Yosemite DPs and finally the Yosemite GM Candidate. One of the Yosemite Developer Previews transformed the previous Apple_HFS partition into a Logical Volume Group. The (only) Logical Volume is not revertible: The Boot Camp assistant can't ...


4

Your internal disk is a Fusion Drive combining an SSD (disk0) and a HDD (disk1). It uses a Core Storage partition scheme. The superior "Macintosh HD" is the name of the Logical Volume Group build by the compound of the two Physical Volumes (disk0s2/disk1s2) of your Fusion Drive. It's used instead of the name of the physical device in a non-Core Storage ...


3

I'm assuming you have nothing on the new disk and essentially want to mirror what is on the old disk to the new disk. You can use the following command line, substituting the proper names for Source-Disk (old) and Destination-Disk (new). rsync -xavH /Volumes/Source-Disk/ /Volumes/Destination-Disk/ Note: The slash at the end of each path has significance, ...


3

According to this article you can get OS X to read and write to NTFS, so if you are planning on using the disk for both, then go with NTFS. The one thing you need to check is if Time Machine will write to NTFS. It writes to NAS's which are not using an Apple proprietary file system, so it may work okay, just check before you commit to it. As for partitions, ...


3

To rename the Recovery Partition, falsely named "EFI Boot", I first mounted the Recovery HD, by showing all partitions in Disk Utility. To show all partitions: 1.) quit Disk Utility 2.) In Terminal write or paste: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUShowEveryPartition 1 and hit 'enter'. Launch Disk Utility and mount the hidden, but now showing "Recovery ...


3

I had a similar problem. I created a 30 GB partition and after deleting it there was unused space. I couldn't manually get the original full partition back because of disk errors. So I booted into Recovery (Command + R), repaired the disk with Disk Utility and then the resize to original was no problem. Rebooted and now back to normal. Had no need to ...


3

I did fix this by resizing (making it a bit smaller) the Partition1. After doing this I was able to delete/resize all the other partitions. Well, I have no idea why this happened, so this is not a real solution but probably a bug of diskutil.


3

There are at least two approaches to solve your problem: One is potentially destructive, vastly undocumented and i don't know if it works (1) and the other one is for sure destructive (2). So please backup your Mac OS X and your Ubuntu partition if necessary. Requirements: USB thumb drive with a full working Mac OS X and iPartition installed or a Linux ...


3

I have never, and I mean never, even back to the "classic" Mac O/S days (going back to system 6) partitioned a drive into smaller chunks. Performance gains were supposedly about different parts of a rotational drive being faster than others (EG quicker seek to sectors near the physical hub). There may also have been some O/S speed gains in some O/S if you ...


3

To delete CoreStorage volumes you have to use the CLI: please backup your volume "mainHD" boot to Internet Recovery Mode (hit altcmdR immediately after the start-up chime) open Disk Utility and check/repair mainHD quit Disk Utility , open in the menubar Utilities/Terminal.app and enter diskutil cs deleteVolume LVUUID to delete the Logical Volume in your ...


3

I have run Mavericks/Yosemite on a 64 GB SD card and after a clean install, there was about 20-30 GB free. I would say that you could install Yosemite on a 20 GB partition, but I would not recommend anything less than 30 GB.


3

Instead of rebooting constantly to test software in different environments, try a virtual machine. I use VMware Fusion. Major advantages include suspend rather than shut down, and you can have as many as you have disk space for. You can have as many running simultaneously as you have memory for, and you don't need extra hardware to handle different versions ...


3

Your volume Macintosh HD is a Core Storage Logical Volume and part of a Core Storage volume group and thus can't be modified by iPartition or Disk Utility. You have to boot from an external disk, a thumb drive or in the Internet Recovery Mode to be able to modify the volume with some Terminal commands. The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is ...


3

If your Mac OS partition is encrypted with FileVault 2, it will be unreadable when you are booted to Windows. At that point, the only thing malware could do to this partition would be to wipe or delete it.


2

Disable FileVault in System Preferences -> Security&Privacy, restart, try again. Worked for me!


2

Disk1 is a "virtual device" which resides in disk0s2 (the Apple_CoreStorage Volume Group which actually contains a FileVault volume). You have only one 'physical device' indeed. Disk0s5 is probably an old Bootcamp installation. The clean way (get rid of the 2 Recovery HDs): Make a complete Time Machine backup of Macintosh HD. Start to Internet Recovery ...


2

There is no need to delete the CoreStorage Logical Volume Group. Just resize it: Have a backup! Reboot into Internet Recovery Mode (hold Option-Command-R) as the machine is restarting). You'll eventually be presented with a Max OS X Utilities window. In the menu bar along the top of the screen, click Utilities -> Terminal. At the prompt, enter ...


2

Your Recovery HD doesn't occupy your whole 3 TB drive. It's disk1s3 in the diskutil listing with the common size of 650 MB. Your Logical Volume Family and the Logical Volume vanished though. To rebuild it start to your Recovery HD or to Internet Recovery Mode, open Terminal and enter diskutil cs list. Copy the LVGUUID To recreate the LV enter diskutil cs ...


2

1 - I think you need a keyboard to boot holding Alt (Opt) key, to show boot partition and disks. 2 - Yes, if you plug in a USB keyboard it's simply works. Mac OS X has the driver for standard keyboards.


2

The access to the OS X partition on Windows is managed through the HFS+ driver. If you uninstall it from Windows, the OS X partition will become inaccessible from Windows. It does virtually protect you from any kind of attack, unless a malware include itself the drivers (I hardly see that happening) or it simply deletes the whole partition. However, you ...



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