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iPartition For all my partitioning, I use and recommend iPartition. It will allow you to resize partitions without deleting any data. It also works for Boot Camp volumes and other PC disks. With iPartition, resizing a partition is as simple as selecting it, grabbing the resize handle and dragging. Not only that, but if you have several operations to ...


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The sleep image file gets created to store the contents of RAM, so you should be able to make things fit by checking the math carefully. How OS X and iOS report storage capacity - http://support.apple.com/kb/TS2419 So, once you've made sure you don't have errors in powers of 2, you can make a small allowance for the filesystem overhead and try using a ...


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You can use diskutil cs list to show the core storage view of things. Once you have the logical volume UUID for the disk in question, you can use diskutil cs deleteVolume to clean up the reserved space that was allocated to the encrypted data and filesystems. That would allow you to surgically remove the core storage. You could also unmount the filesystems ...


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According to this page: http://support.apple.com/kb/PH11102 If the Encrypt checkbox is available, you can select it to keep your backup disk secure. If the Encrypt checkbox is dimmed, your backup disk doesn’t support encryption. Encryption is available only for Time Capsules and for partitions or disks attached directly to your computer and ...


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It is definitely possible to partition a single drive into two partitions and have separate encrypted Time Machine backups on each partition for your two individual Macs. The only downside is a single point of failure since there's a single physical drive used for two machines. If anything goes wrong with that disk, both the Macs would be left without ...


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You'll see drives like as it was internally, just with a different icon. You will even be able to boot from the external MacOS (press and hold alt-key when the system chimes on power-up), but this (boot from USB) will not work for Windows. But the files will be accessible as before.


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Try this: Reboot the Mac into Single User Mode by holding ⌘ (Command) + S when pressing the power button. When the command prompt finally appears, type: /sbin/fsck - fy After this is completed, type reboot or exit. Wait for Mac to start up normally. Back in Disk Utility, hit Verify Disk, then try and partition as normal.


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I also have this issue... MacPro, 3TB drive (Seagate). I have to use the terminal: diskutil list diskutil unmount /dev/disk22 diskutil eraseDisk HFS+ "Macintosh HD" /dev/disk22 etc etc to utilize this drive correctly. (Sorry for all the commands. Posting them just in case it helps someone. Though anyone using those commands better know what they do ...


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Try starting up from the recovery partition and repairing the main OS X volume (like Macintosh HD, indented below a drive) from Disk Utility. I had a similar problem, but there was only about 25 GB of disk space classified as "hidden space" by DaisyDisk. When I used Disk Utility to verify the Macintosh HD volume, there was an error about an invalid free ...


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My guess is the software did subtraction to show you the value of "hidden space" and the only thing going on is that the operating system user that ran the tool doesn't have read permission in some directories where files are stored and cannot show you a breakdown of those files. Basically, it added up all the files it could count, totaled their size (161.5 ...


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According to a post by SuperDuper's developer, reinstalling OS X over an existing installation adds a missing recovery partition: Actually, you can easily recreate the recover partition by simply reinstalling Lion from the App Store. (This has the additional benefit of updating the recover partition with the most recent data, too.) ...


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For all my partitioning, I use and recommend iPartition. With its intuitive yet powerful user interface, iPartition makes it easy to create, destroy, resize or format partitions on your hard disks, whether internal, external, fixed or removable. iPartition even allows you to modify Boot Camp partitions without any problems. iPartition will reconfigure ...


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This is what I found to work: Create USB stick using Apple Bootcamp Assistant (and keep it in your machine for the duration of the installation). Follow the entire process (including specifying the size of your Windows partition). When Bootamp Assitant reboots your machine you need to interrupt the installation by holding option until you get a choice of ...


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Sorry to hear that rEFIt it broken is Mavericks, I'm sure they'll fix it soon enough. In either case you can still select an alternate boot drive by holding option on system startup. The Mac will show you any devices that are connected and bootable, and you can just pick one to start up on (Likewise from the Startup Disk preference pane in System ...


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Here's what I would do: Backup your full disk (all partitions) to an external disk using Carbon Copy Cloner or SuperDuper. Copy your home folder back to the main partition (to /Users) using "Paste Exactly": in Finder, go to your home folder on /Volumes/Data HD, select Edit → Copy from the menu, go to /Users (still in Finder), open the Edit menu, hold ...


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Time machine will use "up to" all the partition. So at the beginning there is going to be free space remaining. This free space will lessen with the time. When the partition is full, TimeMachine will delete the oldest backups. So yes I would suggest a partition and yes the Disk Utility will allow you to partition your hard drive with a low probability of ...


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iPartition For all my partitioning, I use and recommend iPartition. It will allow you to resize partitions without deleting any data. It also works for Boot Camp volumes and other PC disks. With iPartition, resizing a partition is as simple as selecting it, grabbing the resize handle and dragging. Not only that, but if you have several operations to ...


2

Sounds like you started to overwrite the drive. The data is probably still recoverable, but, as Graham said, you don't want to do anything to the drive until you attempt to recover the files. A few options: While I haven't used it, PhotoRec looks like a good option, if you are comfortable with the command line. Despite the name, it can recover all sorts ...


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The resizing can be finicky when there is a gap in the space between the partitions. Especially when if not all the logical volumes / partitions are HFS+ format. It's not clear that you will be able to do this without seeing the core storage listing and the normal listing: diskutil list diskutil cs list The first shows how the filesystems are mounted ...


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Always have a good backup before you attempt any partition and/or filesystem changes! That said, here are some answers to your list of questions. 1. ability to shrink/expand/add/delete partitions safely after both OSes installed, while safely preserving the data By default, Disk Utility allows resizing only through changing the end of a partition (not ...


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OS X Mavericks requires at least 8 GB of free space to install to. At least 15% of free space is recommended for updates and other such things. Therefore, the minimum space for OS X is 9.2 GB, or to be safe, 10 GB. So yes, using Disk Utility to partition before you installed Boot Camp would have meant that you could have made the OS X partition smaller. ...


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Your partition table does not know about the larger hard drive yet. While Disk Utility also queries the hard disk size and lets you request it to enlarge your partition, it will fail when finally changing the partition size (after doing a file system check). This can be solved on different ways: One is to destroy the GPT (partition table) and recreate it ...


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It all depends on what is going on with the drive and unfortunately there is really no good way to tell. I have been using Diskwarrior for YEARS and it is still my go-to disk repair tool. Drive Genius is pretty good too. I have both but always start with Diskwarrior. These tools MIGHT be able to repair the volume issues, but it might be quicker, easier and ...


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After a lot of trial and error and research I came across this post that solved my issue: https://discussions.apple.com/message/19084645#19084645 Long story short, running fsck_exfat on the Data partition (disk0s5) indicated that the main boot region needed to be updated and it provided an option to update it. Sure enough, this fixed it. Prior to running ...


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What error do you get? "The disk you inserted was not readable by this computer", or something else? Could you please give the output of the command below when pasted in your command window: syslog | tail | open -ef Once before you insert the disk into the USB port and once after.


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I managed to run more diagnostics against the disks from the Windows side. From the BitLocker password screen, choose something like "Esc", "Esc", "Skip this drive", "Advanced", "Utilities", "Command-line" (please correct), then use manage-bde -unlock to unlock the BitLocker drive, and use various wmic commands to examine the disk partitions. Through this I ...


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The way to solve the problem on OS X actually is to create an encrypted disk image and put that on the second partition. This gives you all the benefits you'll get from an encrypted partition and works without additional software. Alternatively you may want to look at TrueCrypt which offers partition-level encryption (among others) and also works ...


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The real reason may be the fact, that the recovery partition is no longer there. Have you tried the resize with diskutil command? (man diskutil look for the resizeVolume command). If nothing else, it might give you a different or better error message. A repair on the volume might also help. Also see this question.


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What you need is the refit tool. Then on the Mac (via DiskUtil) shrink/resize your Mac partition and create a partition for Windows in the free space. Then, via Refit (on the Refit boot menu under tools), sync the Mac partition table and MBR-partitions (this will create a windows-readable MBR type partition map that matches the partitions you created on ...


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What I did was just to insert the original linux installation disc, go to the partition page again. Hover around and finally successfully get rid of the ext3 (mine one that cannot be removed by the mac disk utility program) partition. Then I went back to Mac again, this time the resizing/repartitioning worked, yeah!



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