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Your internal disk is a Fusion Drive combining an SSD (disk0) and a HDD (disk1). It uses a Core Storage partition scheme. The superior "Macintosh HD" is the name of the Logical Volume Group build by the compound of the two Physical Volumes (disk0s2/disk1s2) of your Fusion Drive. It's used instead of the name of the physical device in a non-Core Storage ...


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More people have problems with BootCamp trying to partition manually than any other way. This is what I would do: Boot into recovery mode. Get into disk utility Delete the partition you created for Windows Expand your Mac partition all the way into the available space Now (assuming you already have the BootCamp media created) Run the BootCamp.app and ...


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By typing the command lsof /Volumes/Mac\ HD\ 2 into the terminal, you can get a list of which apps are using that volume. The output looks like this: The COMMAND column should tell you what's using your disk, and what you have to quit. Based on your comment, it looks like the GitHub application is using your disk. Try quitting it first, then you should ...


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Your main disk uses a Core Storage partition scheme: disk0 is your main system disk. disk1 is a "virtual" disk residing in disk0s2 containing the Macintosh HD volume visible on your desktop. The first two sectors of a Logical Volume contain zeros only. Examples: disk2 is the Core Storage Volume pooling disk0s2 (SSD) and disk1s2 (HDD) of a 3.1 TB ...


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From the Tom's Hardware Forum: By default, the OSX disk utility creates a new partition as GUID. Windows can't read it. You need to create the partition type as MBR, which Windows can read. Then format as exFAT and both machines will read it.


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Run the following command in Terminal: diskutil cs resizeStack ACA4133B-5F31-4D66-B502-4EABED4E2958 5E6D00FD-4BAD-424C-92CF-F8080CCC2C95 3.128t The first UUID is your LV UUID, the second is the PV UUID that you want to grow (incase I mistyped one of them). This will grow your disk back to fill up your 3TB disk. You may have to reduce that number to 3.1279t ...


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Update 2 Based on the current state of your MBR and GUID partition tables, I recommend the following steps to finish fixing your computer. I do not think it is necessary to boot to Internet Recovery Mode before entering these commands. Make a Time Machine or other form of backup. (Just in case.) Execute my Update 1 on /dev/disk0. Upon completion, the ...


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Basically you have to delete the linux partitions (disk0s4 and disk0s5) and then expand your CoreStorage volume (Macintosh HD) to the full size. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing altcmdR while booting Open Terminal in the menubar -> Utilities enter diskutil list and diskutil cs list to get the partition and the CoreStorage listing. Now unmount all ...


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ran into the same problem and found this article that fixes it a little easier Just run diskutil coreStorage list, find the logical volume uuid, and then run diskutil coreStorage revert (that uuid) in your case diskutil coreStorage revert 2F7B1893-07E8-4194-840B-F2552042E055 http://awesometoast.com/yosemite-core-storage-and-partition-woes/


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The reason it shows three "Macintosh HD" drives, is because it's trying to obfuscate the "CoreStorage" partitions you're seeing with the command you used. It helpfully (or not so much) tells you what volume those CoreStorage volumes are a part of (in this case "Macintosh HD"). Then it also shows you the mounted "Macintosh HD". The EFI partitions are required ...


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The way to deal with this is by separating the fusion drive, reformatting each drive, and recreating them. I suspect what's happened is your Mac cannot recognize the NTFS formatted portion of the disk. Reboot while holding Alt + Cmd + R for Internet Recovery Mode. Go to Utilities > Terminal, and in terminal type: diskutil cs list, then find the UUID under ...


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You should be fine, and you got really lucky because you failed your way into saving your disk. I'll first break down your dd command: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdisk1 Copy everything from zero to /dev/rdisk1 (your main disk, ouch!) bs=1024 Sets the size of the blocks to be copied. In this case, you are coping in 1Kb blocks. This is more important in the ...


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If you zero out the drive, it means that you've completely erased the drive, partition map and all. The partition map tells the OS how a drive and its' space is used, and in order to use one to install and OS to or store data on, it needs at least 1 partition. If you've used OS X's built in Disk Utility "Erase" function, it asks for a new name to rewrite the ...


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You may use some third party tools like Paragon-NTFS. It installs a driver on the Mac side that reads the NTFS partition of your Windows side. Some years ago I used the free "FUSE" drivers, but it seems to me, the development has stopped. http://www.paragon-software.com/home/ntfs-mac/index.html Another solution would be to use a USB thumb drive, which is ...



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