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17

There isn't any advantage to wiping and reinstalling OS X on a new Mac direct from Apple. You'll end up with the exact same drive contents. I can't think of any difference between an Apple-imaged Mac and a self-imaged Mac.


12

Use the -g flag. From the man page: -g Do not bring the application to the foreground. Example to open your home folder behind the current window: open . -g As a side note, it is often better to manually peruse the documentation for new commands, as the verbiage may be different from what you expect: i.e. "Do not bring the application to the ...


11

How about the Apple OSX License Agreement: http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/OSX10103.pdf in particular, Part 2, section I: I. Other Use Restrictions. The grants set forth in this License do not permit you to, and you agree not to, install, use or run the Apple Software on any non-Apple-branded computer, or to enable others to do so. Except as ...


10

Google gives the following definition of "illegal": contrary to or forbidden by law, especially criminal law However, your friend appears to have only committed copyright infringement, and possibly breach of contract if you believe that end user license agreements are enforceable contracts and that he formed a contract with Apple by using its operating ...


10

There are several disadvantages: Most internet posts describing how to reinstall OS X miss the hardware specific diagnostic boot image that is stored on Recovery HD. You will lose the iLife apps if you don't first boot the factory OS and claim those redemptions to an Apple ID. The recovery boot isn't a deal breaker if you don't mind using a generic ...


10

There is no portable ps program. The ps command available on linux is, as others have mentioned, from the "procps" package. The reason why this cannot be ported to OSX is because Linux and OSX kernels do not expose this information in the same way. Linux uses a pseudo-filesystem in /proc, whereas OSX uses the sysctl function. Other systems may use either ...


9

The How can I figure out what's slowly eating my HD space? provides a general approach to answering your question. Graph and Find You can use a tool like GrandPerspective to help highlight large files on your Mac: Disk Inventory X is an alternative disk space visualizer: Ask VideoBlend's Developers Consider contacting the makers of VideoBlend, ...


7

You can use meta data. Select the app in Finder, press ⌘+i or secondary click -> Get Info.. There You have "Comments" section, where You can describe Your app (for example "great screen capture app"). Then You can search for an app in Spotlight using the keywords You privided. After upgrading the app, extended attributes are not erased.


7

Quicktime You can use QuickTime Player to record everything that happens on your computer’s screen or on a portion of your computer’s screen, along with your narration, if you’d like. This is called a screen recording. In QuickTime Player, choose File > New Screen Recording. Choose options for the screen recording from the arrow pop-up menu. If you want ...


6

So I got fed up with this and decided to fix it the hard way. I found out where Spotlight initializes the status bar item, and I just patched the status bar size to zero. This requires editing the Spotlight binary. (Note that Search.bundle is just the little stub that gets loaded into SystemUIServer to allow Spotlight.app to control the status bar). Do the ...


6

No - since it does not exist. As to why there is no builtin ps in GNU’s coreutils package, see this answer on the Unix & Linux Forums. The best alternative formula available via Homebrew is psgrep: psgrep is a small Bash shell script that searches the process list (as obtained by ps(1) ) using the awesome utility grep(1) for its power. That ...


6

⌘ CMD+⇧ SHIFT+. Reveals hidden files in Open/Save dialogs. NOTE: this is not working in Column View. The second part: hidden files are usually sensitive and not experienced users should not edit them without knowing what are the consequences. Edit: You can also press ⌘ CMD+⇧ SHIFT+G and type the path to the hidden file, just like in Terminal (⇥ TAB ...


6

This question probably has all the answers for you. In short there is no easy way. Your options are: Recover the files from a (Time machin) Backup, if existent. Reinstall OSX, e.g. from the Recovery mode pressing Command+R at the startup screen Copy the missing files from the Recovery partition (check if the partition is up to date first). E.g. by doing ...


5

The mere fact that Apple claims that creating a hackintosh violates the DMCA, and that their EULA is an enfoceable contract, does not make either so. There are rulings in their favor from the Psystar case, but it is not clear whether those rulings apply to end-users or only to companies like Psystar who were reselling hackintoshes. The chance of an ...


5

I'm not sure you can really have both… Telling Excel to close a window doesn't tell Excel to quit. It doesn't actually tell it anything other than you closed a window. It sits there waiting for you to tell it what to do next; it can't guess what your next action is going to be. Of course, if you Quit it, then it goes away & the last-used app will be ...


5

Yes, there's a way to install OS X on the SSD. It's called "install OS X on the Fusion Drive." The Fusion Drive automatically puts the most frequently-used files on the SSD. When there are vital system files that your hard drive needs to access in its every waking moment, there's really no reason why the Fusion Drive would ever demote it to the HDD.


4

Simply connect external hdd with enough storage and use Time Machine application (which is included in OS X) Here's tutorial from Apple


4

In a Terminal: mdfind kMDItemKind="Application" > ~/Desktop/apps.txt This will create a file named apps.txt on your Desktop, containing the full paths for everything that OS X considers to be an "Application" on your system. This is might be a lot more than you want. You can limit the search to a given folder by adding -onlyin <dir>, so: ...


4

"It wouldn't be on the Internet if it was illegal". LOL! I guess he hasn't used the Internet much. Anyway, moving along... Pirated software is certainly illegal, but for the sake of discussion we'll assume that your friend owns a legal license for OS X that isn't currently being used on another computer. As mentioned in other answers, making a ...


4

I have a few suggestions. According to to the manual, you can set the UserName key- https://developer.apple.com/library/mac/documentation/Darwin/Reference/ManPages/man5/launchd.plist.5.html. You could use periodic with a shell script to run slocate and change the permissions of the database. Setup a user crontab. A user crontab will only run at the specified ...


4

You can! Press alt-Delete to not select the next message when deleting emails. I use this all the time.


4

The .filename was intended by unix to represent invisible file names. Even before there was GUI's, the ls command by default would not list these files for normal users. There is no reason you can not add a . prefix to your own file names. On the other hand, using ._filename seems to be unique to OS X. One use of these filenames is to store addition ...


4

That indeed sounds very strange. Keep in mind that there can also be stores which only fake their licenese and aren't real service providers. If you want to be sure, look up here: https://locate.apple.com/ | There you can search for official Apple Authorized Resellers. You also could contact Apple-Support and ask them: ...


4

You should have to remove an EFI password or permit them to reset that since it prevents Service Providers from network booting to diagnostic images or selecting an attached bootable volume to run test software. You don't need to decrypt FileVault 2 in any service I've ever seen unless you want them to log in to your user account and look at your software. ...


3

Repair centers generally need to boot your device. They do NOT need to access your account. You will need to remove an EFI password if there is one If you use filevault just create a separate account for them. Something obvious like "AppleService" with "password" and delete it when they are done. It does not need to be an admin account unless you took it ...


3

You can edit the source of the world clock widget to add UTC (or name it whatever you prefer): cd /Library/Widgets sudo vi WorldClock.js Then, in the Europe section, add the line: {city:'UTC', offset:0, timezone:'UTC', id:"2647937"}, You may need to remove and recreate any existing clocks in your dashboard for UTC to show up in the list.


3

The simplest way to prevent the access is by Get Info.. (or ⌘+i on directory and setting the permissions there. To prevent other user from viewing your files, settings should look like: username(me) read / write everyone no access Note: remove all the other positions like group etc.


3

Mouse Locator Highlights the cursor with a green circle upon keypress. Highly visible locator instantly reveals your mouse position. Controllable trigger time period, from 1 second to 30 minutes. Eliminates the frustrating search of your screen.


3

Pointer Finder This app will put a circle around your cursor when you press a key.


3

To find all files larger than 50MB in any directory, use Terminal.app and the find utility: $ find . -type f -size +50M -ls | awk '{for (i=1;i<7;++i) $i=""; print $0}' | sort -n Adjust +50M to whatever size limit you find suitable. The list will be sorted with largest file last. Be warned that this might take some time if you start from root. You might ...



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