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Its just simple just delete the server application from applications and install it again and do not create any other local server in it and it will be solved


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I've been doing exactly what you describe for 8 years, it works just fine. I assume you set up Server with your internal IP address, and that it is a fixed IP on the local network? Server does NOT like having it's IP address changed. The external address can change 10 times a day. You say you already have a domain and a dynamic update service - I assume ...


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this user could loose data Then they had better tighten the data up. when I shutdown computer Don't. Just close the lid. If it is plugged in, background processes (like XCode compilation) will still run. If not, it's their problem and if it is XCode that particular process will simply fail and get processed elsewhere. There is really no need to ...


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Maybe resetting the permissions on a user's home directory helps: This is easily accomplished by resetting ACLs on the desired home directly by using the Reset Password Utility in the Recovery Partition: 1 Restart your computer from the recovery partition (restart while holding CMD+R). 2 Open Disk Utility and run a permissions repair on your ...


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Ok, to answer my own question, it appears that if the Mac client uses AFP to connect to the MAC OS X Server, then it will not use AD. If I instead browse the the Mac OS X server using SMB (eg, connect to: smb://servername ) - then it will connect as an AD user (with no prompting for username/password) and will list all the shares that AD users have access ...


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Seems someone had been fiddling with the DNS server :) All good now!


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You should install unbound and have that be your dns resolver on Mac OS X. Unbound supports DNSSEC. Next, you need whatever apps you want to use, to be aware of and respect the results of the DNSSEC validation that unbound does. As an example, SSH can use DNSSEC along with SSHFP to validate the fingerprint of the server that you are connecting to. ...


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Set up your server as an internal gateway similar to the network configuration in this question: Router <-- ethernet (or Wi-Fi) --> Server <-- ethernet --> switch <-> internal network Then adjust all settings as outlined in my answer there: I assume the following IP-adresses/netmasks: Router: 192.168.0.1/24 Server: en0: 192.168.0.2/24 ...


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The solution I found was to add a switch in between and to simple pull the cable when I want to restrict internet access for the others. Sadly there is no easy software solution.


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OS X Yosemite doesn’t have support for natd binary or ipfw anymore. Instead pfctl is used. I assume the following IP-adresses/netmasks: Router: 192.168.0.1/24 Mac mini gateway: en0: 192.168.0.2/24 gateway 192.168.0.1 en1: 192.168.1.2/24 Internal network: 192.168.1.0/24 First you have to enable forwarding on your Mac computer with following commands: ...


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You can do this directly from any router with DD-WRT firmware, or a router with sufficient admin privileges. If you have an Airport router, the process is even simpler: http://www.macworld.com/article/1161672/limit_internet_access.html


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After searching for a few hours I've finally found the command! dsconfigldap -r *servername*


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Go to your HD > Applications > Server.app Right Click > Show Package Contents Go to Contents > ServerRoot > usr > share > devicemgr > backend > app > views > emailer Open the email_profile-multipart.erb file in your IDE of choice, and make your style edits to the HTML email.


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You could possibly alter the DHCP reservation for the device(s) you wish to prevent internet access in such a way to make the DNS pointer point to something invalid, 127.0.0.1 Not sure if it's what you're after but it could be worth looking into. If I had OS X server myself, I'd write you up an applescript snippet to do the switching quickly and ...


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In the Finder, select the "Go" menu > "Connect to Server...", then click on the Recent Servers menu button (button with tiny clock, to the right of the "+" button) and select "Clear Recent Servers". Now go to a Finder window, select the server from the list and click on the Disconnect button and the server will be disconnected. (OS 10.10.3)


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I'm assuming you have another device handing out the DHCP leases. If so, try modifying the DHCP settings on the Ethernet Interface directly, and then turn on Internet Sharing. To do this: System Preferences > Network, click the "Location" menu, and click "Edit Locations," name your new location, and click "Done". For Ethernet, click the "Configure IPv4 ...



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