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There are two solutions, depending on the situation Create a computer-to-computer network. Doing this will cause you to lose your internet connection. To do this, follow the instructions from Apple: Choose Create Network from the Wi-Fi status icon in the menu bar. If the icon isn’t in the menu bar, choose Apple menu > System Preferences, and then ...


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Usually that means that your phone is doing a heavy-weight network activity, which can mean any of the following (not exhaustive list, only most common, and, coincidentally, easiest to fix): The network you've connected to needs some more configuration, and it's taking some time to get the configuration information set properly from the router (or, more ...


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You can do this with Onavo Count Onavo Count monitors and analyzes all types of mobile data and phone use. This includes background, foreground, and Wi-Fi use.


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This is not a network setting, there are still likely components left behind. Probably the best place to ask this question would be landesk.com. For example http://community.landesk.com/support/thread/16347


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You want to make sure that your Mac's ethernet device is before the wifi device in the system's network service order. In System Preferences, Go to Network; under the device listing, click the 'gear' icon and select 'Set Service Order.' Drag 'Ethernet' to the top. Per my understanding, all traffic will attempt to be routed through the top-most device, and ...


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iOS 7: Tap Settings Tap on WiFi Tap on your connected WiFi name Tap the static tab and enter your addresses Close out of the Settings and launch Safari or another network app to confirm connectivity


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What you are trying to do is indeed possible, but it requieres a lot of work to get it working. I thought about that for a while and it is a great Idea to use a mac as Wifi-Router, especially in Virtual-Test-Environments. But Mac OS X does not work like that. The reason for that is, that Mac OS X only starts the service, if you really have Internet ...


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From the "Security and Privacy" preference pane in System Preferences (In Mac OS x Mavericks): You can help Apple improve its products and user support by having your Mac automatically send Apple information from time to time about how it's working and how you use it. This information is collected anonymously in a form that does not personally ...


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Interestingly it does show Connected but the WiFi settings are wrong and the Network settings are wrong? Anyway, lets bypass the GUI and use Terminal for some direct commands. In Terminal type (to turn it on) networksetup -setairportpower en0 on Next type (to scan) /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/Apple80211.framework/Versions/A/Resources/airport scan ...


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You'll have to manually edit VMware's network preferences and add static hosts to get this working. The file necessary can be found at /Library/Application Support/VMware Fusion/vmnet8/dhcpd.conf. The file is read-only so chmod it writeable first. For each static host you'll have to add the following and change the hostname, MAC address and IP to your VMs: ...


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You can do this with Activity Monitor. You can run this in the background with the window closed and it will track the data usage for the apps and services. In Mavericks, this is a separate Network tab, but you can add the Sent/Received columns to the view in Mountain Lion too.


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It is likely a name resolution issue, which is usually the case when an IP address works and a name does not. there are a couple of things you can do if the PCs have IP addresses that rarely, or never, change you could add those to the hosts file. Just open up the terminal.app and: sudo nano /private/etc/hosts After the last entry just put the IP ...


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The article you reference was indeed correct for when it was published and that's how it works prior to Mavericks. Under Mountain Lion 'named' get's launched when Internet Sharing is active with /etc/com.apple.named.proxy.conf as the config file. This is all observable under Mountain Lion - I verified it. However, domain name resolution isn't just based ...


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You can use the standard ping that the Mac OSX comes with to find pmtu. ping -D -s <size> <host> shoud do the trick. Please note, the size is just the ICMP datagram payload size. To see the IP MTU, you need to add 8 bytes of the ICMP header and 20 bytes of the IP header (so for example, to send 1500 Bytes long IP packet, you need to specify ...


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I would set up a user to automatically log in and lock the screen immediately with a password (or as close to immediately as you care.) That will mount the external drive and start up sharin for all users. Alternatively, you could drop the $20 on OS X server and have it mount shares at boot like you rightly expect a server to behave.


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Type in Terminal: scutil --get HostName If there's no HostName available, what you see is probably coming from the DNS or DHCP server. Set your HostName with: sudo scutil --set HostName 'yourHostName' That should do it.


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I might be wrong, but it could be possible to use something like Transmits "Kernel Extension / Network-Drive Mounting System". Fork Lift has this feature too. and it shows up as a "Generic File System (OSXFUSE)" on my MacBook Air. If you really want it, it's worth a try because both have a demo version.



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