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0

I had the same problem on El Capitan, and was able to resolve it by adding some values to the DNSResponder file, while SIP was DISABLED. The steps I followed below: Reboot. Press Cmd+R to enter Recovery mode. Open Utilities->Terminal. Run the command "csrutil disable". Reboot. You are back in OS X with SIP disabled. Make the required changes by running ...


0

Your WiFi adapter has failed. I am basing this answer off your statement in the question that it was working 2 days prior, but is no longer working now. WiFi adapters don't disappear from a systems unless they have either failed or something very significant has been done to the system. But, to be certain, we have to do some diagnostics first.... Get ...


0

Click the + sign at the bottom from the list and choose Wi-Fi in the drop down menu that appears.


0

wim-deblauwe's comment links to Release & Renew DHCP from the Command Line with ipconfig which shows how to do this: The basic syntax to renew DHCP lease from the command line with ipconfig is as follows: sudo ipconfig set (DEVICEINTERFACE) DHCP If you know the device interface (en0, en1, en2, etc), just run that command to release and ...


0

There is another tool which can identify AirPrint devices. It is the little known ippfind utility, that ships as part of CUPS (on Debian: as part of the cups-client package). There is an ippfind.exe utility available for Windows as well. It ships as part of the IPP Everywhere Selfcertification Software Package which is available for download from the ...


1

After some extensive testing the only solution I got to work is a VM setup. Setup the NordVPN GUI client or Tunnelblick and connect to the Swedish VPN-server (preferably with an openvpn connection). Often VPN-providers use a NAT firewall - which means you are first connected to an internal network. You can get the network with ifconfig. In your above ...


0

Here is another answer. It's shorter, and more direct to the point. However, I'll let the first answer stand on its own, since it may be useful for people who are exploring this topic. Currently, I only know an answer for Linux.... If I find a command for Mac + dns-sd, I'll extend this answer. On Linux, run this command: kp@zdv-linux-003:> ...


0

Your router (Airport Extreme) doesn't need to support or even have the DDNS support built in, for DDNS to work with your setup. You just need a client on your network that can talk to the DDNS service. You don't need to be on the router to get your public IP address; you can get get it from any client anywhere on your network that has Internet access. The ...


0

I don't believe the Airport Extreme "speaks" to No-IP. It looks like No-IP sets your DDNS address to the one from which you set up the account, but does not accept further updates from the Airport. It's hard to understand why everyone needs to use a different API for something so simple as conveying IPaddr info. It's also annoying that Apple provides no info ...


0

I had the same problem. One possible solution is to delete the WiFi's settings from keychain. Search for 'Keychain Access'. Then select the 'System' option from left. Then delete your Wifi settings. It will then prompt you to enter the password again!


3

I do not have an AirPrint printer on my network. And never played with one either... I cannot test with a real AirPrint device in my proximity right now. But here is how I can list all the IPP-enabled printers (in this case they are all connected via CUPS): First, browse for all DNS-SD discoverable services: kp@zdv-wireless-43-219:> dns-sd -B ...


0

You shouldn't need a firewall rule to forward packets because Apache can listen on your selected port. Leaving it as port 80 also won't conflict with anything. What you need to look at is your httpd.conf file. Specifically, the "Listen" directive # Listen: Allows you to bind Apache to specific IP addresses and/or # Change this to Listen on specific IP ...


0

I made a configuration which is a sort of Airplane mode for MacOS X, and am regurlaly using since more than 10 years with no problem and a lot of advantages (when under attack, when troubleshooting a process with network problems...). See: Airplane mode for MacOS X


-3

why not just remove the Ethernet cable and only connect via WiFi which is so easy, just turn Airport off when you don't want to be connected from the menu bar. Sorted


3

Damnit. I searched for a while but without using the keywords "airplane mode osx" which only came to me when I edited my question here. Research using these words led to a very useful answer available here : http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20130325002258846 If you go to the Network pane of System Preferences, you'll see a Location popup ...


0

I have found out the reason. Since I am in China, for some formidable reasons, I use the Shadowsocks with a public account to connect to the Google.


0

Try typing netstat in terminal.app First I would type man netstat to get a better understanding of how it works and what it is capable of and what the results mean. Try searching a tutorial about the command on stackexchange or youtube.


1

Here's a fish shell script I wrote: function netinfo -d "get network information" # Get public ip address set public (curl -s http://ipecho.net/plain) # Let's account for possible lag in reply from ipecho.net sleep .3 if test -z "$public" # No Internet connection set public "No Internet connection available" end echo " " echo " Public IP: ...


2

sudo ifconfig en0 alias 128.133.123.83/24 up


2

Bear in mind that the visibility of Network Activity Indicator is managed by the App's Developer and not the System detecting a connection. That being said, there are numerous reasons for this behaviours you're experiencing. Perhaps the Apps were coded to react differently to different actions, or they wrongly hide the Network Activity Indicator despite ...


1

This answer is based on the comments as the user perhapsmaybeharry covered how Bonjour works and how to disable it. Edit: New info - Most of the time this computer is not showing up. But it has a few times the last month. So it really feel like someone has gotten into my network. PLEASE HELP!] This could be anything from a shared computer that has ...


0

1. Wireless interference The most common cause of what you describe here is a common wireless interference problem. This probability is pretty high if your network loss of performance was closely related with the move of wirelessly connected computer or of pieces of furniture made of metal or glass (these cause many radiofrequency reflections). If you want ...


1

Best I've been able to come up with myself is to write a script that runs iftop -f "dst net REMOTE_IP" -t in the background, redirecting the output, and after a certain timeout kills the process, and then grep/awk my way through the redirected output. Hardly elegant.


0

I am also having Wi-Fi issues (for months) with MBP 2014 and I found a temporary solution to the problem. I have tracked down the problem to be or kernel or driver implementation bug with 802.11n (the important info here is the "n"). I have an Airport Express and inside the configuration for Wireless (Radio Mode) you can choose for 802.11n with 802.11b/g ...


0

I am also having Wi-Fi issues (for months) with MBP 2014 and I found a temporary solution to the problem. I have tracked down the problem to be or kernel or driver implementation bug with 802.11n (the important info here is the "n"). I have an Airport Express and inside the configuration for Wireless (Radio Mode) you can choose for 802.11n with 802.11b/g ...


0

No, there is no limit to the number of WI-Fi networks your computer can remember unless your computer runs out of memory because it has to remember too many networks. ;)


0

Restart NFS without Rebooting Issue the following command in Terminal: sudo nfsd restart This has the effect of stopping the NFS daemon, starting it back up, rereading your config and processing what's in your /etc/exports OS X Disconnecting from NFS Try this: find . -name ._* | xargs rm on the R-Pi in the directory that gets mounted. That will ...


0

A request timeout on ICMP (ping) going from your Mac to your your network device simply means that the device, not your Mac failed to respond to the ping request in a given amount of time. There is a good explanation of that here. This can happen for any number of reasons; network congestion, device load, wifi signal interference, power loss, etc. Most ...


0

Over time, Wifi hardware has progressed through several versions. In addition to higher speeds, the newer versions tend to offer better connection quality when there are many wifi signals and other interference in the vicinity. It could be that your computer has older wifi hardware than your phone, and hence is not able to handle the interference as well, ...


0

Just to rule out the obvious. Are you able to ping those IPs? Maybe even nmap them to see if any ports might be closed.


0

There is autossh doing exactly what you need: autossh -M 12345 -N -R 2000:localhost:22 root@my_server_ip But you should certainly reconsider running the tunnel using root account, when it is password-less (unless you have the key limited using authorized_commands).


0

You should talk to the VPN administrator. Typically, the decision about what traffic is routed to your network is made by the VPN server since there are security implications to allowing the device to send only some traffic down the tunnel. We use Cisco VPN and we do not allow clients to do what you describe because it opens a potential hole in our network ...


0

This is not a security breach (if you're on a public network). The "shared" section under the sidebar is Apple's Bonjour protocol that allows for detection of other computers that support Bonjour. In the case of a computer being shown in the sidebar, the computer is not connected until you click it and authenticate. I would assume you would be on a public ...


0

I think you downloaded the firmware for the device. Try this link to the OS X download page for the IX2. Or this link to directly download the dmg.


11

You can do this without having to install any additional apps or software. Just use the command curl and the free geo ip website http://freegeoip.net. Execute the following command in Terminal (I am using Apple's IP for this example): curl freegeoip.net/xml/17.178.96.59 You will get your results in an XML format: <Response> ...


-1

See if you set a wrong DNS address in system preferences -> network


1

Try setting a new network location. Network Preferences/edit top drop down/new location/apply If that doesn't work you may need to reinstall OS to resolve software issue.


0

I've had the same question, but from the other point of view. I wasn't aware of ifconfig (kinda new to this stuff). I think I got it working by doing it the other way round. I first had OS X share my internet over wifi (via sharing preferences) Then with ifconfig, you'll see that OS X creates a bridge100 (or something) I set the IP manually like you did on ...


0

@Nikita was half right before you do that though giro Settings.app>sharing>internet sharing then select what you want to be shared and where it will be shared then create wifi network meow 😺


2

A solution does in fact exist. Click the Wi-Fi symbol in the menu bar and choose Create Network.


-1

The computers are not being discovered by Bonjour; they're being discovered by NetBIOS. NetBIOS is a common network protocol that all IP-based devices use to announce themselves on the network. That includes printers, security cameras, phones, etc. It cannot be disabled on the infrastructure side (well, technically it can but this would break one of the ...


0

I have a home-grown script that uses a rather inelegant polling mechanism to identify open network connections, and takes action based on what it finds. In short, it turns my wifi on or off depending on if it's plugged into a LAN. This to avoid connecting our corporate LAN with our visitors wifi. It uses ifconfig to obtain this data. It's fairly easy to ...


1

I am experiencing the same problem. The issue is the router. There are a number of reasons why the router would do this....memory of the router is too small, too many connections for it to handle, to just poor quality components. The way you can verify that it is the router is by Pinging the router (which you did and it failed) Pinging another device on ...


0

I had this exact same issue where Little Snitch detected external AirPlayXPCHelper traffic on port 7000 but treated it as internal traffic. What I mean is that even though I had all external traffic marked as deny, Little Snitch continued to prompt me on each connection attempt until I set it to deny local traffic (just for testing purposes), obviously I do ...



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