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10

In short, the microphone won't work as a microphone the way you're trying it, but the earbuds will. Longer answer... In order to use the microphone from your iPhone headphones, they must be plugged into the headphones socket. You can see in the images below that the MacBook Pro "Sound" preference pane recognises that they have a microphone and switches the ...


10

What you are picking up is EMI from USB frame sync (most probably through the ground wire): Every millisecond (12000 full-bandwidth bit times), the USB host transmits a special SOF (start of frame) token, containing an 11-bit incrementing frame number in place of a device address. This is used to synchronize isochronous data flows. High-bandwidth USB 2.0 ...


9

The audio-in port on Mac Minis is a line-level port, meaning that a standard PC microphone may not be audible without some sort of amplifier. On any Mini from 2010 and later, you can use the Apple headset (the kind that comes with the iPhone), but you have to plug it into the headphone port, not the audio-in port. There are also adapters available that ...


7

This is the Mac OS X built in voice input mechanism. To turn it off, visit preferences - it's possible to turn it on via a keyboard shortcut which may explain it's random appearance. Speech Recognition Speakable Items, built into OS X and located in the Speech pane of System Preferences, lets you control the computer using your voice ...


7

I'm fairly certain the green light is hard-wired to the camera, there's no way to activate the camera without activating the light, precisely for privacy reasons. If you're really concerned about it, you can always just use a piece of electrical tape to cover the camera (or fold a piece of cardboard over the top of the lid for a non-sticky solution). ...


6

Actually, if you plug in an TRRS plug (the one with three rings on it) into the headphone jack, your Sound menu will switch from "internal mic" to "external mic" and you don't need a powered headset. So if you have a headset with two plugs, you'll need a combiner Y-adapter for that. They're about $4. Edit: the TRRS plugs come on headsets like the iPhone ...


6

Since the A-D conversion is happening at the peripheral end, then the noise must also exist there. Without access to the device for disassembly, I can only guess at the problem, but it's likely to be due to one or more of the following: The peripheral is probably fully shielded internally from the microphones through the ipod connector. When you connect ...


5

I would take a look at Rogue Amobea's application LineIn. LineIn is a free app and can be found at http://www.rogueamoeba.com/freebies/. From Rogue Amobea's site: LineIn is a simple application for OS X to enable the soft playthru of audio from input devices. In simpler terms, you can use LineIn to play sound coming in through a microphone or any other ...


5

You cannot directly plug your headphones into the Audio Input jack and have it work, because, the microphone/button signal rides on the third ring, and the audio input jack only connects the first two. You have to have specially designed hardware to connect to that third ring. This is currently achieved via the Headphone/Audio Output ports of devices. Only ...


5

The port is used to "set up Real-Time Transport Protocol (RTP), Real-Time Control Protocol (RTCP)" according to Apple. According to wiki, "the Real-time Transport Protocol (RTP) defines a standardized packet format for delivering audio and video over IP networks. RTP is used extensively in communication and entertainment systems that involve streaming ...


4

This depends - do you have separate jacks for headphones & microphone or just one jack? If you have two jacks you'll have to get a splitter for it to work properly.


4

it is possible to do it through bluetooth, dock connector, and 3.5mm headphone jack! in order to use it though wifi you need a compatible application and i have never heard of such thing! after a little goggling all i found was bluetooth connected ones, because it offers a P2P connection witch is much more reliable! (sidenote) mics though wifi routers ...


4

First, the AppleScript that inspects the key state and handles the mic enabling and muting: if (modKeyDowntest()) then tell application "System Events" to set volume input volume 100 repeat while modKeyDowntest() end repeat tell application "System Events" to set volume input volume 0 end if on modKeyDowntest() set modKeyDown to do shell script ...


4

Blue Microphones' Yeti and Yeti Pro stereo USB microphones can be used in any recording app on the iPad via the Camera Connection Kit. The manufacturer confirms that this is possible, and has detailed directions for setting it up (including a video) on this page. Note that you will need a powered USB hub.


4

The Tascam iM2 is a stereo condenser microphone that attaches directly to the dock connector of your iPad. Tascam's PCM Recorder app interfaces with this device to record in stereo.


4

According to the iFixit teardown (see step 19) the microphone is indeed located above the camera behind the mesh. No word on the specs.


4

Mac laptops have not supported a non-powered microphone input for years. The input you see is a "line-in" input that requires more input signal level than a passive (non-powered) microphone can deliver. You will need an additional pre-amp or active mic (a microphone with phantom power will suffice).


4

You will need the same type of headset that you use with an iPhone. It will have one 3.5mm plug that carries both the stereo audio and mic input (aka a TRRS plug). Some examples are apple's own EarPods, Sennheiser's PX 200-II i's, and any other iPhone headset.


4

Yes, they are called 3.5mm 4 pin splitter, they separate a 4pin 3.5mm jack in 2 standard 3.5mm jack (1 for headphones, 1 for mic) as this one: Startech.com 3.5mm 4 Pin to 2x 3 Pin 3.5mm Headset Splitter Adapter - M/F you can read the comments, there are also some mac users that bought this splitter.


3

To disable iSight and other cameras, use: sudo kextunload /System/Library/Extensions/AppleCameraInterface.kext (tested on 10.9) I'm not aware of a way to disable audio input without affecting output. It's the same hardware so unloading/removing the kext probably won't work. One step you can take is to turn the input volume down to zero in your sound ...


3

I've got the in-ear headset buds from Apple; they have a single jack and they're excellent. Purchased retail in Austria for around €70.


3

I just checked; the "play/pause" button works, but not the "up/down volume" buttons.


3

Poke the mic with a needle a few times and it's disabled physically if your concern is security related... tinkering in software will not help you, even if you could remove the drivers or anything. If an attacker would get control of the device to listen to a microphone stream he will probably also be able to replace said driver.


3

Physical location of the jack: The audio-in jack on a 13" MBP is a 3.5mm combination TRS port. It will sense standard analog or fiber optic connectors. It also works with TRS jacks for stereo audio out as well as a TRRS jack which allows microphone input as well as control from iPhone/iPod compatible remotes. It can work as a headphone out, line-in, or ...


3

The best way to get a good-quality recording is to connect a microphone or audio signal to an external analog-to-digital audio interface with a microphone preamplifier, which connects to the MacBook via USB 2.0 or FireWire 400. There are many devices by many companies that perform this function. Here is one, the AudioBox USB from Presonus.


3

On late 2008 MacBooks and on, iPhone earbuds will function as headphones and a mic if plugged into the headphone port.


3

Mac OS X comes with speech recognition (check System Preferences > Speech panel) but it can't easily recognize a generic sound, only built-in commands. Now, it is possible to make an automator action or script that is triggered by an arbitrary phrase. However, if by "sound" you mean a beep, blip, crash or other sound that can't be recognized as a string of ...


3

Have you tried plugging it into the headphone jack? Sounds screwy, I know, but I think that's the answer.



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