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0

Recently I experiment a lot with disabling memory compression in Mavericks and I had clearly reproducible problems with hibernating to disk. 1) Enable memory compression and using an hibernate mode that writes to disk works without problems vm_compressor=4 + hibernatemode=3(RAM powered+sleepimage) or 25(only sleepimage) -> no problem when restored ...


0

Speaking generally, adding more RAM gives the operating systems more resources for managing applications in an efficient manner. However, with respect to using Parallels, I'll add the following: I've used Parallels for a few years now, with both a mid-2012 macbook pro (8 GB RAM), and a 2014 macbook pro (16 GB RAM). As a rule of thumb, you want to share the ...


0

If your machine is starved for RAM then it will be swapping pages of memory out to disk. You can check this whenever you find your Mac stalling and performing poorly by opening Activity Monitor and checking the Memory tab. At the bottom of the window you should see a value labelled "Swap Used". If you regularly find a significant value against this then ...


0

Rember is a front-end GUI to the 'memtest' command line memory testing program. http://www.kelleycomputing.net/rember/


2

High memory usage is not a reason for a machine to randomly restart, but if you say the memory usage has an effect on the frequency of it happening, the issue might be a defective RAM. There are several tools to test your RAM, a free example would be MemTest86.


1

Stop focussing on the amount of free RAM, that doesn't necessarily have anything to do with system performance. As others have mentioned the operating system will keep recently used files in caches to improve performance, but it frees up that memory very quickly as soon as something else needs it. Low free RAM isn't necessarily a cause for concern. If you ...


-2

To solve this, I figured that it must be something in my ongoing software that I use in the background that I hadn’t taken into account. I ran Activity Monitor, clicked on CPU and the %CPU column and discovered the culprit: MagicJack. I had never noticed before was the INSANE amount of System resources it gobbles up. In terms of %CPU the mjdev and the ...


0

Apple computers (As well as a few PC's) use hard drive space as RAM if they need to. If your hard drive is packed, it will effect your RAM as well. SSD will definitely speed up your mac but it will shrink the amount of hard drive space you have (most likely, depends how much you spend). I would first try cleaning out anything you don't need from your hard ...


0

I have 2 identical systems, except one with 2GB+SSD, and the other 6GB+HDD. I find the SSD system just as fast if not faster


2

Your memory and CPU usage are normal. And you don't appear to have anything massive running. Modern computers utilize as much memory as possible before swapping anything out to the (much slower) disk. If you have more than 1-2 programs open you should expect to see the memory mostly full. The OS will handle swapping / clearing it as needed. My computer ...


0

i also upgraded to 16GB 1600MHZ on my early 2011 i7-2720QM MBP. runs all good :)


18

There's no need to take out RAM, create a RAM disk or use a VM. Simply boot the OS using the maxmem= boot flag value that's been created for this purpose and been around for decades. Simply open Terminal as a sudoer and enter sudo nano /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/com.apple.Boot.plist After entering your password change <?xml ...


-1

To TAKE OUT RAM, you can: If your macbook is Aluminium, you take the whole bottom off and the RAM should be right smack in the middle. If it's white, take of the little compartment in the corner and access the ram that way. Source: https://support.apple.com/en-ca/HT1651


2

Another solution would be to use a virtual machine to simulate the lower-RAM Mac. Install VMWare Fusion, Parallels, or VirtualBox (if you're adventurous) and install OS X in that. Then you can manipulate the number of cores, amount of disk space, and (as you were requesting) amount of RAM available to OS X. VirtualBox is free, but currently limited to 3Gb ...


12

Just create a RAM Disk with the size 2 GiB to reduce available RAM for the system and running applications. To get the necessary number of blocks to create such a disk, multiply (RAMdiskSize in MB)*2048. In your example that's 2048*2048=4194304. Then open Terminal and enter: diskutil erasevolume HFS+ 'RAM Disk' `hdiutil attach -nomount ram://4194304` ...


7

Yes - use the memory_pressure tool to apply real memory pressure to the system. It's not a perfect analogy to removing the memory chip since the virtual memory tuning still knows there is 4 GB or RAM and the -p percent_free argument won't allocate a constant amount of RAM, but keep the system close to X percent free. It should allow you to very quickly see ...


3

Closing the last window of an application doesn't necessarily close the application. For example, opening two TextEdit windows and then closing them both (kbd>Cmd-W or click the red close button top-left of window) will not close TextEdit. This allows one to click File>New (or Cmd-N) to open and work on a new TextEdit document. You may be familiar with how ...


0

Clicking the close button (the red x in the window's title bar) will usually only close that window not the application. Use command-Q to quit the application.


0

The question the OP is asking is will having extra RAM increase performance when the MacBook is using the SSD for the swap file. SSD is fast. Yes, RAM is faster but, come on, we're talking milliseconds here, so it's not going to be noticeable to the average user. So why fork out cash for extra RAM when you won't notice any difference?


1

This is a known issue in Yosemite, although it doesn't affect everyone - I have 5 Macs running Yosemite and one suffers badly, but the others not at all. Temporary relief comes from rebooting or stopping and restarting the affected services. For discoveryd, in Terminal, do: sudo launchctl unload -w /System/Library/LaunchDaemons/com.apple.discoveryd.plist ...


1

I couldn't possibly venture a guess as to "why" except to chalk it up to Murphy... However Mac O/S is very picky when it comes to RAM. It is my guess that Apple updated some of the code in the O/S that checks for issues with RAM and it noticed a problem. That it now works with the RAM effectively swapped is even more puzzling. It is possible that there is ...


1

The Spotlight Web Content process is part of Spotlight Suggestions. When you start to type in Spotlight or the Safari address bar, Apple sends what you are typing out to their servers to suggest possible web matches and pre-fetch web pages based on what the system thinks you might be looking for. For example, if you start to type N E, it may pre-load ...


0

I noticed Chrome got mentioned. Chrome too give me memory trouble. Especially when I open Google Drive, it just go crazy and eat all the RAM, and subsequently all the swap it can get. Switch to Safari and regularly restart memory leaking applications. There's no other way round.


2

Here are few tools which help to investigate OS X memory issues: Basic: Run Console.app and check on 'All Messages' to see what's currently happening. Use top and hit Space to refresh - easier to find the cause problem. Use sysdiagnose command or shiftctrlaltcmd. to quickly gather system-wide diagnostic information helpful in investigating system ...


4

OS X (and all modern operating systems) is designed to use all of the memory that's available, for file caches if it has no better use for it. That's not a problem, since memory used for file caches is still available for applications to use.


1

This isn't directly answering your question since I don't know of a way to disable the file cache mechanism in OSX. That being said, I can't think of a good reason WHY you would want to do so in the first place? What makes you so sure it is because of the file cache? The file cache is a dynamic thing in that it gets larger as you do more I/O with your disk, ...


1

Agree. SSD upgrade will make everything you do on that laptop faster. More memory will only kick in as a boost from time to time. If you do a lot of compiling, all those little include files will hit the SSD sweet spot and you'll feel like you have a new computer.


2

I would go with the SSD. First you can check to see how much benefit you would get from upgrading the RAM. You can look at the Activity Monitor.app memory section. The last several versions of Mac OS X have a graph describing "Memory Pressure", which is a way of describing how hard you are pushing the RAM. The OS will naturally try to make use of ALL of the ...


1

Realistically the speed difference between 1866 and 2133 isn't going to make a significant impact on your overall system speed. It's a 266MHz difference but this does not affect overall performance in the same way a 266MHz CPU speed bump would. You say you are running virtualised environments, so upgrading to 16GB - whatever the RAM speed - will have more ...


-2

I have a similar problem. iMac mid 2011 with 12Gb Ram, Yosemite. Image Capture Extension taking up 6.04Gb of my memory. I do use my computer for days without restarting. iPhoto, Preview, iMovie and Final Cut. I have to restart every now and then. Doesn't seem like Yosemite clear memory when you close apps.


5

Hard drive cable failure is almost guaranteed to be your problem. We have a deployment of around 70 2012 13" MBPs for staff members, of which around 10% have had a hard drive cable failure. I had a suspicion you were going to say you had the same model from the symptoms you described. The symptoms on our problem MacBooks are exactly the same as yours with ...


4

Upgrading to 8GB will give your more memory-intensive applications a bit more headroom and allow them to avoid unnecessary swap-file usage. Upgrading to an SSD will give a more substantial speed boost overall - apart from dramatically improved OS and application startup times, any applications writing to and reading from a swap-file will also see ...



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