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1

I had the same three beeps with my Early 2008 iMac when I tried to go from 2 to 4 RAM. Making sure the door that you had to screw off to access the RAM is very tightly screwed back in fixed it for me.


4

First of all it's probably a good idea to stop using that memory cleaner app. They aren't necessary these days; if they ever were. The memory systems on modern operating systems are perfectly capable of maintaining themselves. The way these memory cleaner application work is by claiming a huge chunk of RAM, thereby forcing everything not critical out of RAM, ...


1

First, Chrome uses a lot of memory, especially if you have had it open several days. Usually closing apps helps recover and frees portions of memory, but still keeps some for the very same reason RAM is used. After closing you're apps, you can purge command in your terminal to force disk cache to be purged (flushed and emptied). sudo purge Enter your ...


3

I have a MP1,1 that served me faithfully from October 2006 to around July of this year. Like you, I put a SSD in it and ended up with what is largely a new machine. Over those 7+ years I upgraded HD's, video cards, added some RAM and that's about it. Unfortunately the upgrade cycle ran out of steam this year. App Store submissions require Xcode 6 now, and ...


5

Short answer, yes. The MacPro 1,1 can run 10.7.5 as it's latest OS. I have a 2008 Black MacBook which runs the same. Despite being on an OS from 2011, you can still run the latest version (v7.1.0) of VMWare Fusion. You can also jam 32 GB of RAM in there. Plus, the Xeon from 2006 will almost be comparable to a Core i5 from a couple of years ago. Like ...


3

The main limitation is that it won't run a more recent OS X version than 10.7 (Lion), which probably won't be supported with security updates for much longer. I wouldn't put it on the Internet, but it should be fine as a VM host on your LAN.


2

Definitely Yes My 08 is still well worth keeping going - it's still my main machine, with up-rated GPU, SSD, & RAM. I see no reason why it shouldn't be worth keeping an 06 going for a while longer. Maybe Bootcamp rather than VM, if you need what speed remains in the machine. As you have plenty of drive bays, I'd Bootcamp to a different physical drive, ...


0

I tried the following steps listed here: Delete /Library/Preferences/com.apple.windowserver.plist Delete ~/Library/Preferences/ByHost/com.apple.windowserver*.plist Shutdown OSX Startup, immediately press and hold the P and R keys while holding down the option (⌥) and command (⌘) keys before the gray boot screen appears, which resets the PRAM You may have ...


0

Logic Board - I installed OS X on a USB drive and booted from it. Performance was normal (expect it to be a little slower). How does this rule out a logic board problem? Aren't you just swapping one volume for another but still using the same logic board?


0

Upgrading to Yosemite did make things quite a bit better. It's still a bit sluggish sometimes, but overall response times are much better. Also, the spotlight indexing took quite a hit.


-1

Upgrade to SSD first then only come the RAM. There is software to help you enable TRIM support for third party SSD


1

In my experience, an SSD has led to faster load times (a formerly-1:20 boot time became 18 seconds!), but a RAM upgrade has epically increased the stability of the computer (I used to get the beach ball of death on a daily basis, which the SSD did nothing to combat, but I can count how many times I've gotten it since going from 4 to 10 GB a few weeks ago on ...


3

Don't get a 128GB SSD. You don't want to run a 3rd party SSD on OS X without a decent amount of free space since you won't have TRIM support. Does Activity Monitor show memory pressure? If not, I'd save my pennies until I could afford a 256GB or 512GB SSD. I've done both RAM and SSD upgrades many times and an SSD has always been by far the best upgrade in ...


2

Once programs are started they reside in RAM. So if you have enough RAM they will be fast. A fast SSD will be also helpful but usually it is not used much during normal operation if you have large RAM space. I would start with RAM upgrade, since the RAM is acting as SSD but it is faster. Main difference in SSD you will see when starting up the ...


1

If you want to boot up programs faster, i would advice you buy the SSD first. This is the part of your computer that is responsible for booting up programs.


1

I would use something like Crucial's online configurator rather than the vague specs in a shop window. That way you have a guarantee it will work. Kingston & Corsair have the same kind of thing, but Crucial gives you the option of downloading an app to do all the work for you.


0

Your logic is sound. Just something to keep in mind is that while yes swap is much faster on a SSD, it is still much slower in respect to RAM and both should probably be upgraded. But yes she would see the most improvement by going to a SSD Just as a side note 10.10.1 will try to pre-cache as many things as possible in RAM so apple uses 'memory pressure' to ...


1

The program /usr/libexec/secd is shipped as part of OS X and is a normal security process. The documentation says it relates to "runtime security policies for processes". You can inspect the associated processes with this command: ps -ef|grep sec[iud] On my Mac, I'm user 501 so you have this output for one user logged in: Mac:~ bmike$ ps -ef|grep sec[iud] ...


1

There are potentially a few things happening here. When a computer runs out of available RAM it starts swapping or paging data out of RAM to files on your hard disk. When your Mac was previously saying that it was using 3.98GB of 4GB it could also potentially have had a lot more data loaded but part of it swapped out to your hard drive. You can find these ...


1

You'd probably had a lot of compressed memory in your 4GB days. Now, with 8GB, you're not nearing your limit yet so your computer doesn't see a need to compress anything. If you ever hit 7.99GB, you'll start building up compressed memory again. (I recently went from 4GB to 10GB, and I'm currently using 9.97GB but only have 7.1MB of compressed memory.)


2

The old days keeping as much RAM free as possible are gone. The new RAM management from OS X, use all available memory, but also manages it so that you get maximum performances. If you look in the Activity Monitor- memory, you will see things like Memory Pressure, Compressed among other information.


0

It turns out that the issue here was a failing SATA cable. It hadn't totally kicked the bucket, hence the computer could still boot and run fairly normally from the internal hard drive. I believe the intermittent lag was caused by the faulty cable. The good news is, replacing it was easy (albeit a little pricey at $40). It's only a few more steps than ...


0

I have exactly the same configuration (MacBook Pro Early 2011 16GB/10.7.5 though) and my sleepimage has full 16 GB size. Just delete it by opening Terminal (located in /Applications/Utilities), and typing in the following command, followed by the enter key: sudo rm /private/var/vm/sleepimage Enter your administrator password (it will not be visible) and ...


1

A guess See whether the problem is reproducible with compressed memory disabled. If that's not a workaround, please vote down this answer and leave a comment. Related vm_compressor_mode (vm.compressor_mode) values for enabled compressed memory in OS X – there's a link to an answer about disabling compressed memory.


0

Originally posted 20141207 on ViktorPetersson.com I found my model number plist file in: /usr/share/pmenergy/MacBookPro11,1.plist but left it there pending my swiftly-approaching Apple Store visit. I had to struggle to keep the Mac Geniuses on the subject of kernel_task but once I did that, they came up with the following solution. That was yesterday. So ...


2

If it's not apparent, this is just a guess. But hopefully it gives you some leads. First, here's what you can figure out just from the program name. If you run the command /bin/ls /usr/libexec | sort -f | egrep '.*d$' (this print all files in /usr/libexec ending in d), you'll find ftpd, hidd, networkd, systemstatsd, and a lot of programs ending in d. The ...


2

From what I know about that process (which really isn't a ton) is that it has something to do with the Mac's Keychain. What you can do is find in in the Activity Monitor and click Cmd+I to get the info about it. One tip you can try to do is run the Keychain First Aid by going to Keychain Access in Spotlight, opening the "Keychain Access" menu, and selecting ...


1

Look at /Users/(your user)/Library/Containers/com.apple.Preview/Data/Library/Autosave Information/ That's where mine are right now.


0

I had what sounds like a similar issue on same version of Yosemite and resolved using the following ... WindowServer high CPU on Yosemite Hope it helps.


0

Ludicrous for sure. Though it does seem to be a fair price. The Macbook Pro 6,1 and 6,2 both use the same spec RAM, 1066 MHz PC3-8500 DDR3 SDRAM. The 1GB sticks should work in your laptop, assuming they are still functional. Put the 1GB sticks in and hope they replace them with 2GB modules.


1

I found problem. The problem seems to first exhibit itself during graphics-intensive tasks like playing games or high-definition video, or running the CPU hot. The display ends up distorting, or going entirely blank, and while reboots make the problems go away for a short period of time, they almost always return later. After the graphical glitches start, ...


0

2560 x 1600 is more than "fullHD" or whatever marketing terms they use these days (or those days). 1080p - is often called "fullHD" and is 1920 x 1080 resolution. QuadHD is quad (4x) 720p or 2560 x 1440 resolution. The old high def resolution is 2560 x 1600 - this is the resolution of old professional or similar monitors -such as Apple's old 30" cinema ...


0

How many of those apps do you use/keep open simultaneously? If the answer is "a lot", there's no way your RAM could support it. I'd recommend going to Activity Monitor and clicking on the Memory tab to see what your RAM usage looks like.


0

try a new SSD, if you have the same problem you can return it and you'll know it's not the hard drive.


2

Go to Activity Monitor's Memory tab and sort the list of processes by Memory. You'll have a complete list of your biggest RAM hogs, complete with the ability to select and quit them right from Activity Monitor. Also, Memory Diag is a great app for freeing up RAM. Just click on its menu bar icon, click the big Optimize button (provided you're not at critical ...


0

This guy explains it well http://www.chriswrites.com/what-is-virtual-memory-on-the-mac/ So What is Virtual Memory? Your Mac comes with a limited amount of physical memory (RAM) installed by default. Memory is critical to any computer to run applications and carry out all the operations commanded by the user. Memory must be as fast as possible ...



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