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Your issue could be in how far back in time the mail app is syncing with your accounts. I have 3 accounts - Gmail, iCloud and an Exchange account. Combined, Mail is taking up 16 MB. Go to Settings > Mail, Contacts, Calendars > [Account] > Mail Days to Sync. Is it on No Limit? Change that to a shorter period, such as 1 week. This will make the mail app only ...


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The current Macbook Pro 13" (early 2015 model with i7-5557U) is faster than the latest available Mac Mini (late 2014 model with i7-4578U). On paper the Mac Mini (late 2012 model i7-3720QM) is faster and more easy to upgrade (ram + hard drive) but it's probably not available for purchase any more. In reality the new Macbook Pro will be much faster because ...


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It is rather difficult to compare a fresh 'cold' new system with a 'warm' fully synchronized and updated one. New Macs have a lot of catching up to do; iCloud service syncing and system patches being two of them. On the other hand OSX - and every other OS really - chooses a healthy part of the available RAM (real, physical memory) above swapping to disk ...


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The MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2010) has, 2 - 204-pin PC3-8500 (1066 MHz) DDR3 SO-DIMM Memory Slots in which Apple says the Maximum Memory is 8 GB. In order to utilize 16 GB you need, 2 x 8.0GB PC8500 DDR3 (1066 MHz 204 Pin) running Mac OS X 10.7.5 Lion or later and the latest EFI Boot ROM version Firmware for the model Mac you have, which should be ...


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It looks pretty normal to me. Web pages each use memory & it soon adds up. Right now your Activity Monitor is showing some compressed, but no swap used; which means everything is still happy. Having only 4GB of RAM these days means you've just always got to keep an eye on it, but so long as memory pressure stays out of the red, everything is nominally ...


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I'd like to post an update: I have purchased two Corsair 4GB ram sticks. They work perfectly and passed the memory test. It is indeed a memory compatibility issue - My 27" Imac doesn't take 8GB ram sticks! Thank you all for your help!


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For a definitive, although OS specific, answer, from Memory Usage Performance Guidelines: Wired Memory Wired memory (also called resident memory) stores kernel code and data structures that must never be paged out to disk. Applications, frameworks, and other user-level software cannot allocate wired memory. However, they can affect how much wired ...


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Intel HD graphics are integrated graphics, meaning (among other things) they share the same memory as the CPU–they don't have dedicated VRAM. You can read more about it on the Apple side here. Under OS X, there is no (reasonable) way to adjust this besides adding more RAM.


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Assuming you have some linux knowledge, your question can be rephrased to this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/131303/how-to-measure-actual-memory-usage-of-an-application-or-process Add a process memory check to a scheduled task that runs every x hours/minutes. If it exceeds a number kill the process. Although, if you are confident the issue is with ...


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That is heavily dependent on the apps on each desktop and how you have them all configured (desktop picture, icons, etc.) I would open up Activity monitor and start adding desktops and see where it takes you.


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You can indeed increase the amount of VRAM in certain Apple models. In fact, you have already done that for 1 or 2 times. 2012 Mac Mini 4GB allocated 768MB to VRAM in it's original release state. Upgrading the RAM back in 2012 to 8GB would have given you 1024MB. Keeping the RAM at 4GB but upgrading to OSX 10.9 would also resulted in 1024MB. Following your ...


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VRAM is only included on dedicated graphics cards. On other computers (such as the Mac mini), the OS reserves a portion of RAM for use with an integrated graphics processor. There's no way to adjust this. Some Macs will adjust the amount of VRAM they use dynamically, but there's still a maximum amount it will use, and you can't change that.


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iOS does not store that information anywhere. The capacity of a Lithium-Ion battery is simply based on the Voltage that the battery is currently outputting. Take a look at a Voltage over time chart for Li-Ion batteries. More information about determining capacities for Li-Ion batteries can be found here.


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Thank you for providing the updated information - however, as I suspected, that is one of the few iMacs from that period that cannot take more than 16GB RAM. I'm struggling to find data on whether it can specifically use 2x 8GB RAM sticks, though your own experiments would seem to say it cannot & that its maximum configuration would be 4x 4GB sticks. ...


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I have also experienced this problem with my iMac. There was a simple way I was able to fix it in the end. All I had to do was switch around the different memory boards into different slots. For some bizarre reason once I had the 'right' card and slot combination the computer switched on and has worked fine ever since! Hope this helps some of you out there ...



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