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The Spotlight Web Content process is part of Spotlight Suggestions. When you start to type in Spotlight or the Safari address bar, Apple sends what you are typing out to their servers to suggest possible web matches and pre-fetch web pages based on what the system thinks you might be looking for. For example, if you start to type N E, it may pre-load ...


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That's Yosemite search snooping into your browsing history etc. More detail and how to turn it off here — http://www.wired.com/2014/10/how-to-fix-os-x-yosemite-search/


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I noticed Chrome got mentioned. Chrome too give me memory trouble. Especially when I open Google Drive, it just go crazy and eat all the RAM, and subsequently all the swap it can get. Switch to Safari and regularly restart memory leaking applications. There's no other way round.


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Here are few tools which help to investigate OS X memory issues: Basic: Run Console.app and check on 'All Messages' to see what's currently happening. Use top and hit Space to refresh - easier to find the cause problem. Use sysdiagnose command or shiftctrlaltcmd. to quickly gather system-wide diagnostic information helpful in investigating system ...


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OS X (and all modern operating systems) is designed to use all of the memory that's available, for file caches if it has no better use for it. That's not a problem, since memory used for file caches is still available for applications to use.


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This isn't directly answering your question since I don't know of a way to disable the file cache mechanism in OSX. That being said, I can't think of a good reason WHY you would want to do so in the first place? What makes you so sure it is because of the file cache? The file cache is a dynamic thing in that it gets larger as you do more I/O with your disk, ...


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Agree. SSD upgrade will make everything you do on that laptop faster. More memory will only kick in as a boost from time to time. If you do a lot of compiling, all those little include files will hit the SSD sweet spot and you'll feel like you have a new computer.


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I would go with the SSD. First you can check to see how much benefit you would get from upgrading the RAM. You can look at the Activity Monitor.app memory section. The last several versions of Mac OS X have a graph describing "Memory Pressure", which is a way of describing how hard you are pushing the RAM. The OS will naturally try to make use of ALL of the ...


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Realistically the speed difference between 1866 and 2133 isn't going to make a significant impact on your overall system speed. It's a 266MHz difference but this does not affect overall performance in the same way a 266MHz CPU speed bump would. You say you are running virtualised environments, so upgrading to 16GB - whatever the RAM speed - will have more ...


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I have a similar problem. iMac mid 2011 with 12Gb Ram, Yosemite. Image Capture Extension taking up 6.04Gb of my memory. I do use my computer for days without restarting. iPhoto, Preview, iMovie and Final Cut. I have to restart every now and then. Doesn't seem like Yosemite clear memory when you close apps.


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Hard drive cable failure is almost guaranteed to be your problem. We have a deployment of around 70 2012 13" MBPs for staff members, of which around 10% have had a hard drive cable failure. I had a suspicion you were going to say you had the same model from the symptoms you described. The symptoms on our problem MacBooks are exactly the same as yours with ...


3

Upgrading to 8GB will give your more memory-intensive applications a bit more headroom and allow them to avoid unnecessary swap-file usage. Upgrading to an SSD will give a more substantial speed boost overall - apart from dramatically improved OS and application startup times, any applications writing to and reading from a swap-file will also see ...


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I may be an Apple cool-aid drinker, but the answer is still yes. I code for a living on a PC but have never personally owned a PC. I am deeply engrained in the Mac experience and every day at work I miss the subtle, simple, and elegant nuances of MAC OS. I've cussed Windows about some thing every day for 14 consecutive years. My Mac experience from a user ...


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The only measurable difference aside from storage space is that the SSD version will be slightly more secure from data loss from the occasional fall. SSDs don't suffer from disk drive failures of scratched disks. But if your not clumsy, that's not a problem. Go with the 1TB drive. 128gb is pitiful in this day and age.


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Typically, you can use laLoadInt to get processor load, and hrMemorySize and related MIBS to get memory metrics. However, my experience is that on Mac OS (at least, on 10.8.5), snmpd was compiled without kmem, because apparently apple doesn't support the calls. I am amazed that Apple would simply remove this feature, but it appears that they decided we ...


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Simply… Both SSD first - having that for your swapfile will immediately appear to 'speed up' the RAM, just because access times will be much faster. RAM second - as more RAM/less pagefile will be faster still. Rough prices… 500 GB SSD - $200 4GB RAM - $33 Source ...


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Depends on what you're hoping to gain from your upgrade. An SSD will load everything faster, but RAM can keep more stuff open at once. If you find your computer being unbearably slow in literally everything it does, an SSD is the way to go, but if, for example, your computer only starts acting up once you open your "lots of tabs," you'll want the RAM boost. ...


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Go to Crucial.com (or any other similiar site that sells ram and ssds) and check out prices. Ram is a LOT cheaper than getting an ssd. If you can afford both, get both. If you're running Yosemite then 8gb will make a marked difference. If all you're doing is surfing the internet then go through your hard drive and free up a load of space, a cheap usb drive ...


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Just did SSD upgrade on 2012 MBP non retina and it flat flies now. Was gonna do ram but my graph is low mostly it's just HDDs are sooo slow. Love it now!


1

Open up activity monitor and check your RAM usage. If it's high pressure (check the graph), or even swapping files, you will benefit from more RAM. Any computer will benefit heavily from installing an SSD. Expect everything to go 10x faster (not kidding). Also, it will make you not having enough RAM less of a problem, as it will speed up your swap. So it ...


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It depends on your budget. If I were you, I would upgrade both RAM and change 512 GB SSD. There is also Super Driver bay to SATA HD adaptor available. You could put your HDD there.


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The MacBook Pro: How to remove or install memory article you linked does not state 1600 MHz for MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2011)! It actually states "PC3-10600 DDR3 1333 MHz type RAM". I would not purchase 1600 MHz RAM and instead purchase what is specified. As to voiding the warranty for upgrading the RAM yourself, I was told at an Apple store that it ...


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The 1600Mhz will not harm your computer and yes it is faster. It is unclear if you will notice the 1333 vs 1600, since the main speed improvement will come from memory size increase from 4 to 8 Gig. Recommended is not to mix old and new, so you will have to buy all 8 Gig of same type.


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You probably can, as le least one of my friends do. Just go to Intel ARK and make extra sure what kind of RAM and how much of it can the processor handle.


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The newer imacs support dual channel what means that tou can have 2 different sorts of ram memory. But make sure that there are at least 2 of the same installed so: 2x 4 gb and 2x 8gb should work fine. For more info, thid link


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Yes, like on every other computer you can mix the ram sizes. Though watch for the frequences (they have to be at same or higher) and the compatibilites.


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If it's indeed the last model of white polycarbonate "unibody" MacBook that Apple made prior to the discontinuation of the MacBook (non-Pro/non-Air) lineup then it will actually support 16GB of RAM (2x8GB PC8500 DDR3 1066MHz SO-DIMM 204 Pin) and that's vouched for by the specs for that system in MacTracker as well as by the reliable folks at OWC. You'll ...


3

The values in your image look fine. Since the system is lagging, why not measure things over time: vm_stat 60 You can let that run in a terminal to get an aggregate feel for when swapping happens and at what rate. It's highly likely that some other thing is the bottleneck like CPU or storage, but without seeing things change over time, it's hard to say ...


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My daemon shows 418 MB of RAM in Activity monitor (and see details below). It's not any concern for any of my Macs. If you open up your Activity Monitor, you will likely see that the memory pressure (the important number) is green. Also, consider control clicking on the memory column (when viewing memory) and select all the memory items. You can then ...


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This is what I have on mine. iMac with 32 GB of memory, OS X Yosemite 10.10.2


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Have a look in the Console log. You will likely see that it's a Python-internal issue. Most likely a recursion or some exhaustive memory allocation. Python and other languages use a limited stack/heap to store runtime data (like the call stack). If that is exhausted they simply croak and do not ask the OSX to provide more memory.


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Short answer: yes. Get the most memory you can afford. Long answer: my wife upgraded her 2009 macbook from SL to Mav just before yosemite came out. She also had only 4Gb and was running quite comfortably on SL. Mavericks was not. Quick inspection revealed lots of swapping. Installed two new 4Gb sticks (max'ing out the machine at 8Gb). Memory pressure ...


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To answer this question accurately, you will need to get some statistics on how much RAM you are currently using. But in general, more RAM is going to improve things, especially if you're still on 4GB. On the other hand, the 2009 iMac is really reaching EoL at this point -- according to Mactracker, the support status for that machine is currently "Vintage". ...



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