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4

You can exactly specify the certificate to be used for sining outgoing emails by following these steps: Open your keychain. Then right click on the list of certificates and pick the first item on the context menu (I don't know how that is labeled in english but something like new identity setting): Then type in your email address and select the ...


4

You can use Boolean operators: Use Boolean searches: Use Boolean operators such as AND, OR, and NOT. For example, to search for messages that contain “yosemite” and “yellowstone” but not “teton,” type “yosemite AND yellowstone NOT teton” or “yosemite AND yellowstone -teton.” You must type Boolean operators in uppercase. Souce: ...


2

Found the answer to my own question. For some reason, simply asking the question tends to provide me more clues from which to solve it myself. Weird how that works. Apparently there are substitutions within Mail for Smart Quote and Smart Dashes, which is what was giving me fits. You'll find it under "Edit \ Substitutions \ "


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Gmail accounts are specifically subject to this issue. In this Apple Support Communities post, there is a good discussion of why this occurs and how to reduce or stop it. To quote a particular response: Mail creates a temporary draft each time you compose a message. If you send the message while the IMAP account syncs, the draft doesn't get deleted ...


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E-mails that have been placed into the spam folder by Apple Mail will have this header: If you see an e-mail in your spam folder that lacks this header, than the e-mail has been automatically been placed into the spam folder by your mail provider. You should mark it as "not spam" from within your mail service's web client.


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This is certainly possible with AppleScript. Here are some resources and snippets to help you craft your ideal script. The final AppleScript combines the content of any selected e-mails and prepares an outgoing e-mail ready for sending. You can embed this AppleScript within an Automator workflow, or save it as an application for double-clicking. Getting ...


2

Apple Mail doesn't have a way to do this natively. I can't think of another email client that does what you're describing either. Here are some ideas and workarounds that might help you accomplish something similar to what you describe; perhaps one of them will suit your needs. The closest option in Apple Mail is to use flags. That only gives you the ...


2

As far as I know, the only way to guarantee the encoding is to make sure every message includes an Unicode dingbat (e.g. in the sig). This will ensure that the message goes out as UTF-8. Dingbats are in the Unicode 2700 range, e.g. ✈ . You need to add this from the Character Viewer, not by just changing to a "dingbat" font, which may not be Unicode.


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Apple mail archive are in .mbox format which is not a supported Outlook format in windows. You cannot import this file, that's why. You might want to look for a .mbox to .pst converter. To help you out this might help you: Trial MBOX Converter


1

There are few ways to do this. The From field could be preselected in the mail preferences, using the dropdown and select From that would be ALWAYS used from now on. I still have it as choice since i use multiple emails and want to choose the From. Next is the multitude of From's, way more then actual email accounts. Called the smtp servers list That ...


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Mail.app stores server credentials in your login keychain. You will find your login keychain in: ~/Library/Keychains/login.keychain Copy, rename, and open this keychain file with Keychain Access. Keychain Access is included with Mac OS X in the Applications > Utilities folder. Within the Keychain Access application, search for your mail server using the ...


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If it's a one-time thing using the Boolean operators in the search bar as mentioned above will probably be the best/easiest way... However, Rules and/or Smart Mailboxes will do the same thing (and a whole lot more), but would probably only be worth the time for things you search for somewhat often. Click here for a pretty good article on Rules, Smart ...


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You need to have, installed on your iPhone, the public key of the person you intend to send an encrypted message to. Mail.app on OS X imports the certificates of people who send you mail, automatically. On iOS, you have to do it manually, unless your iPhone is part of a corporate deployment. It's easy! Simply find an email the recipient has sent to you, ...


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This might help in your case: Select the email message you want to send as an attachment. Click on File then Save As and select the format Raw Message Source Open a new email message and add the raw source file as an attachment (either copy and paste or insert).


1

There is a plugin for Mail app which name is SendLater:


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Finally, Micro$oft now supports IMAP! Here is the IMAP settings from the horse's mouth: Incoming IMAP Server: imap-mail.outlook.com Server port: 993 Encryption: SSL Outgoing SMTP Server: smtp-mail.outlook.com Server port: 587 Encryption: TLS



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