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36

The answer depends on you willingness to invest in commercial software: If you don’t mind spending some money on a commercial product, Paragon’s ExtFS driver will give you read and write access to ext2 / ext3 / ext4 file systems. Version 9 supports all versions of OS X from 10.5 to 10.9. If you are looking for a free solution, you can setup a Linux virtual ...


35

This adds symlinks for GNU utilities with g prefix to /usr/local/bin/: brew install coreutils findutils gnu-tar gnu-sed gawk gnutls gnu-indent gnu-getopt See brew search gnu for other packages. If you want to use the commands without a g prefix, install the formulas with --default-names, or add for example /usr/local/opt/coreutils/libexec/gnubin before ...


22

You can install the pstree command using either Homebrew (my personal favourite), MacPorts or Fink and you'll get a command-line, tree view of processes on your Mac. To install with Homebrew it's just: brew install pstree Once you have Homebrew on your machine.


17

Building on Ken's answer: I used fuse4x and fuse-ext2 successfully, and I recommend fuse-ext2 over ext4fuse. ext4fuse was a hassle for me, because it requires manual compilation and has no support for fuse4x options that would allow me to set access control. fuse-ext2 provides downloadable packages, and the 0.0.7 version worked just fine. I copied a few ...


16

The Mac OS X native application do not use the X protocol for the rendering, but the Mac specific protocol. So you cannot use ssh X protocol forwarding as you could with a Linux workstation. As you discovered, the reverse is not true, you can install an X server on Mac OS X and have the Linux program appear on your Mac. What you can do is use either Mac ...


13

That depends on what your problems are with your mac and whether Linux solves them. Gotta give more detail than that, man. Personally, I love my mac for development for a few reasons: Window management is great. At work I have two decent monitors, but when I'm coding on my little 15" MBP, having cmd-tab/cmd-` is great and Exposé is a godsend. I have a ...


12

OS X's tar uses the AppleDouble format to store extended attributes and ACLs. tar and Archive Utility also know how to convert the ._ files back to the native formats, but the ._ files are kept if the archive is extracted on another platform or on a non-HFS volume. You can usually just tell tar to remove the metadata by setting COPYFILE_DISABLE to some ...


9

On Apple hardware, yes - as of OSX Lion / Lion Server. Otherwise, no - it's a violation of the EULA.


9

Your friend has no idea what he's talking about. You don't even need to use a Linux disc - you can use single user mode or a Mac OS X install disc to copy things or make changes to the filesystem. To prevent someone from booting into single user mode or from an unauthorized disc or external drive, your friend can set a firmware password. However, this, too, ...


8

Unfortunately you cannot virtualize OS X Lion under any other OS except OS X Lion. It's not enough that it's running on Apple hardware. The OS X Lion EULA says: Section 2, Sub-Section B: (iii) to install, use and run up to two (2) additional copies or instances of the Apple Software within virtual operating system environments on each Mac ...


8

The shortcut for Terminal.app is ⌘+⇧+doubleclick. You might also be interested in the following shortcuts: ⌘+K to clear the screen ctrl+U to delete everything to the left of the cursor ctrl+K to delete everything to the right of the cursor ctrl+A to jump to the left end ctrl+E to jump to the right end


8

So if I am not mistaken the the problem you have with VNC currently is that it is sharing the current Mac user's screen with apps open that you don't want to see on your other computer? Lion introduces the ability to screen share users that are logged in the background. Quoting the text from the link: Enable Screen Sharing and set a VNC password. ...


8

No need to look for an equivalent. It's available for the Mac. You can quickly and easily install it using the excellent Homebrew package manager. Once you have Homebrew installed, just type brew install byobu from the Terminal. It'll download the source, configure and install it.


7

I did a switch from Linux just a week ago. I am using Linux for 15+ years. Lately my Desktop distro of choice was Ubuntu. Mac OS X is a BSD based system, so minor issues you will have to get used to is staff like using ipfw instead of iptables. As you will pretty soon realise Ubuntu (and other distros) simply mimic lots of Mac solutions when it comes to ...


7

As Sylvian mentioned, you can't run your Mac apps and display them on Linux. The best you can do is VNC. You'll see the whole screen, not just one app. Enable a VNC password in Screen Sharing Preferences: You can then use any VNC client application on Linux.


7

The problem is that “other machines” (namely PC computers) use BIOS and Macintosh computers use EFI. Rather than boring you with the details, let’s just say that in order for your “EFI” to find your Ubuntu partition, you have to perform some magic. The instructions for doing that are everywhere, (for example: here). I believe that you need to install rEFIt ...


7

Considering OS X is a POSIX compliant unix system, you can do most of yout *nix programming on OS X anyway. I would stick with Apple, it is a growing market and has some very good tools to help you along the way.


7

Besides brew install coreutils, you may also need to install some other packages, such as gnu-sed, grep (some of the packages require you to run brew tap homebrew/dupes first): brew install findutils --default-names brew install gnu-indent --default-names brew install gnu-sed --default-names brew install gnutls --default-names brew install grep ...


7

sudo ln -s /Users /home will work with additional configuration, but I don't think that is a good idea as you should access home via ~ in shell or $HOME. Also /home might be a Linux standard and often used in Unix but not always so better to rely on information that is guaranteed to work not something that works only most of the time if everyone has kept to ...


7

It's possible to install them in multiple partitions and multiboot. But the resulting setup will be a little "rigid". Doing OS X and Windows is easy. Adding Linux to the mix is a little more complicated. I suggest you do not multiboot and only install OS X as the main OS and then use a virtualization solution, like Parallels Desktop or VMware Fusion. With ...


7

IMHO the easiest way is in terminal: First run diskutil list then insert your usb stick and run diskutil list again to see the disk node (e.g. /dev/disk2). Now run diskutil unmountDisk /dev/diskN and do sudo dd if=/path-to.iso of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m When finished diskutil eject /dev/diskN


6

ifconfig gives information about all interfaces, including WLAN. The WLAN interface is usually en1. $ ifconfig en1 en1: flags=8863<UP,BROADCAST,SMART,RUNNING,SIMPLEX,MULTICAST> mtu 1500 ether 20:c9:d0:97:22:e9 inet6 fe80::22c9:d0ff:fe97:22e9%en1 prefixlen 64 scopeid 0x5 inet 192.168.1.137 netmask 0xffffff00 broadcast ...


6

You are right, vanilla Unix doesn't support this. But there is this thing called ACL (Access Control Lists) which allows for a much more granular definition of access rights than the usual user/group/world rights. From Wikipedia: Most of the Unix and Unix-like operating systems (e.g. Linux, BSD, or Solaris) support POSIX.1e ACLs, based on an early POSIX ...


6

Most likely no because it's proprietary technology. Apple's remote disc functionality is provided by the host OS which has to be OS X or Windows having the proper drivers installed. You also have to have a fairly current Mac which has no built-in optical drive. Have a look at Apple's knowledge base for a more detailed explanation: DVD or CD sharing: Using ...


6

I'm not sure that I would recommend replacing them; however, you can install them to a different path and utilize them that way. Overall, if you are coming from Linux and would like access to more "generic" *nix utilities, and a system similar to apt, then I would recommend looking into Macports: http://www.macports.org It allows, for example, using the ...


6

I recommend that you check out rEFIt for your Partition boot manager on Mac. It works great for triple booting a mac, with robust documentation. http://refit.sourceforge.net/doc/ First install refit, then install Windows via BootCamp Assistant in Mac. You will need to partition your Mac drive again and install Linux (settings depend on the distro). It ...


6

On Reusing Your Windows key.ppk File The PPK file is a PuTTY-specific private key. It's not a portable private key that works with any ssh-based application. It just works with PuTTY. You need to convert it first. I've found some instructions for converting it to a proper public/private key pair here. You'll need to do this from your Windows machine. That ...


6

Short Answer: YES, it's reversible, nothing is "permanent" in a hard-drive partition (other than deleting partitions and information of course). Almost always you will be able to undo what you did, although sometimes at the cost of data loss, naturally. While you are at the terminal type: man bless or if you're lazy, you can read it here. You are ...


5

You may be interested in fuse4x and ext4fuse, though the latter is read-only for now. Others viewing this question may be interested in libguestfs. I'm not aware of an OS X port, but considering that VirtualBox has an API, it's not out of the question. I wonder why no one has written a compatibility layer to allow Linux kernel filesystem code to run in ...



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