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18

Your computers should be accessible as computer-name.local, e.g. Kens-Computer.local or something like that, so depending on what you're trying to do, you might be able to just use that name rather than the IP. So you can just type vnc://Kens-Computer.local in the 'Connect to' window. You can see the computer's network name if you go to the Sharing ...


15

Use the built-in CUPS web interface to get detailed printer information: http://localhost:631/printers/


9

Probably the easiest way to do this is to use a command line utility called nmap. You can download the binaries from the main site. Alternatively, if you have Homebrew installed, you can use that to install nmap from a terminal by typing brew install nmap Once you have downloaded and installed nmap, you need one other piece of information about your LAN - ...


9

Use ipconfig getifaddr en1 for wireless, or ipconfig getifaddr en0 for ethernet.


6

Your External IP Address (or, as you call it, the IP address reported by whatismyip.com) is not under your control and you can't simply set it to static. Your ISP gives you a new one when you reconnect, although there are chances that you might get the same, you should never count on it. In order to solve this problem you have two choices: Some Internet ...


6

If you're using Lion, you can use smbutil: usage: smbutil [-hv] subcommand [args] where subcommands are: help display help on specified subcommand lookup resolve NetBIOS name to IP address status resolve IP address or DNS name to NetBIOS names view list resources on specified host dfs list DFS referrals identity identity ...


5

Alternatively, you could try running ifconfig in the terminal. It will show a list of interfaces with IPs by default, along with many many other details such as physical addresses. It can also be used to configure network adapter settings, the man page is here: http://linux.die.net/man/8/ifconfig or you can run man ifconfig on the terminal. In your case ...


5

Many cable modems will only provide DHCP for a small number of hosts, possibly only one. Resetting the modem by unplugging its power supply should let it forget what hosts it has provided IP addresses for, so you can start over.


4

Assuming iOS 6: Tap on “Settings” and then tap on “General” Tap “Wi-Fi” and look for the network name you are connected to, tap the blue (>) arrow next to it Tap the “Static” tab and enter network appropriate DHCP/static IP information Close out of Settings and launch Safari or another network app to confirm connectivity To see the MAC Address of ...


3

The -700 is relative to UTC time and used to describe the time zone. UTC-700 is used in many places, probably including where you live. The messages are shown with their UTC timestamp and the timezone offset. Subtract 7 hours from the time and you'll have the time in your local time zone. This is what computers do behind the scenes. Also, one word of ...


3

Or ping the broadcast address ping -c 3 192.168.1.255 | grep 'bytes from' | awk '{ print $4 }' | sort | uniq


3

You can do the following: Type ifconfig or ifconfig -a. This command shows you the list of interfaces along with their IP and MAC addresses (the latter one only if applicable). You can also type ifconfig en0 or ifconfig en1 for the configuration of a particular interface only (as someone said in their answers, en0 is typically the wired Ethernet while en1 ...


3

Using nmap from MacPorts you can run the following command to attempt to identify the OS of a remote machine: sudo nmap ipaddress -O e.g.: $ sudo nmap localhost -O Starting Nmap 5.51 ( http://nmap.org ) at 2011-08-07 17:58 CEST Nmap scan report for localhost (127.0.0.1) Host is up (0.000085s latency). Not shown: 989 closed ports PORT STATE SERVICE ...


3

Open Terminal and type: arp -a it will list all the computers on the network and (usually) the host names.


3

Of course, to actually do much in ad-hoc mode you even have to setup static IP addresses. Just start the ad-hoc network, then in System Preferences -> Network "Click the lock to make changes" and then click "Advanced". And there you have it.


3

I used: ipconfig getifaddr en1


2

I've got this set up in a .aliases dotfile for frequent ip lookup: alias ip="dig +short myip.opendns.com @resolver1.opendns.com" alias localip="ipconfig getifaddr en0"


2

I highly recommend Little Snitch. Although it doesn't do anything you couldn't do with free tools, it makes monitoring, configuring, and blocking your system's outgoing traffic on a per-application basis ridiculously easy. I'm a programmer, and one of those guys who always has a Terminal window open, and yet I still prefer using Little Snitch for this task. ...


2

You can login to the router and look for DHCP Table. It will list all connected devices along with their MAC and IP addresses. But to avoid this issue altogether, why don't you setup DHCP Reservations through your router? Through that, you can assign a certain MAC address to a specific IP. That way your DHCP IPs remain constant. The steps necessary to ...


2

Unfortunately this depends entirely on the configuration of the router. Perhaps the DHCP (Dynamic Host Control Protocol) server is configured with a very short lease time for clients, and a new IP address is assigned whenever a client has no network activity for only a short time. To fix the problem you will need to ask the administrator of the router to ...


2

I have found it myself. It's already built in in OS X. In System Preferences, goto Network and at the top of the window, you can see a combobox which says: Location. You have to click it and select Edit Locations. At this picture I have already created my Home Network. Create and configure the Home network. And click Apply afterwards. Close the window. ...


2

You can grant users partial admin rights (printers only) by making them members of the _lpadmin group. This is a hidden system group, so it doesn't appear in the Accounts preference pane; you have to grant membership from the command line (as a real admin). You can do this for an individual user: sudo dseditgroup -o edit -a fred _lpadmin or just add ...


2

ifconfig from a terminal command line will tell you the internal IP address. Type ifconfig | grep "inet " | grep -v 127.0.0.1 to remove a lot of the unneeded text. If you want your external IP address, just go to whatismyip.com or to Google and type 'IP Address' to show your public IP. You can also find your internal IP address by going to System ...


2

Look at your hosts file. You can find it by clicking on the "Go' menu in the Finder and select "Go to folder..." then type "/etc/hosts". Copy the file on to your Desktop and open it with Text Edit. You'll see the following lines at the top of the file : ## # Host Database # # localhost is used to configure the loopback interface # when the system is ...


2

The correct form to add a net route is route add -net 10 $GW Obviously you have to replace $GW with the ip address of your gateway.


2

There is lsof -i and netstat -n just to name few of Terminal commands to look who is using the Internet. Those are information only, and will not block anything.


1

Little Snitch is a program that blocks everything that you specifically doesn't allow. That way it is quite easy to keep track on all IPs and ports different programs are accessing. That way it's easy to use that information for Self-Control. http://www.obdev.at/products/littlesnitch/index.html


1

Ok, finally solved it! I'm not really sure but I think the application LogMeIn was the problem. What I did was to remove some startup items in: /Library/LaunchAgents /Library/LaunchDaemons I removed the plists for LogMeIn and GPGTools (I'm not using these anymore and will delete them completely) and restarted and it suddenly worked!


1

On a network with 192.168.0.* IPs and a mask of 255.255.255.0, you can use ping 192.168.0.255 Similarly, on the 128.0.* network, net mask 255.255.0.0 ping 128.0.255.255



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