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13

You could use this to turn it off: sudo ifconfig en1 down And if you want to get it back up, just type up, instead of down Just make sure that en1 is the right interface or you can easily kill off your ssh access :) P.S. As Lri noted in the comments below, you can quickly disable the correct network interface with just 1 line: sudo ifconfig ...


7

I found a relatively simple solution not involving a system restart - just bring the WiFi interface down and then back up: $ sudo ifconfig en0 down $ sudo ifconfig en0 up In my case en0 is the AirPort interface of my MacBook Air. Note that turning the AirPort off and on again doesn't work, but bringing the interface down does the job.


6

No. The iPhone can either act as a client or an Access Point, not both simultaneously. If the WiFi access isn't registered against the device's MAC address then you should be able to use the login on either the iPhone or Laptop (but probably not at the same time). If it is MAC address based registration then you could register with your iPhone and then ...


5

This all happens inside the "Sharing" pane of "System Preferences": Select "Internet Sharing" from the list Select "Ethernet" from the popup menu Click the checkbox next to "Wi-Fi" If you wish to secure the wireless network a password, click the "Wi-Fi Options..." button When you've got it all set up how you like, click the checkbox next to "Internet ...


5

You can try arp on the command-line: NAME arp -- address resolution display and control DESCRIPTION The arp utility displays and modifies the Internet-to-Ethernet address translation tables used by the address resolution protocol (arp(4)). With no flags, the program displays the current ARP entry for hostname. The host may be specified ...


4

One way of doing this is by GUI scripting—System Preferences doesn't have any Applescript support by default. tell application "System Preferences" to set current pane to pane "com.apple.preferences.sharing" delay 1 tell application "System Events" to tell process "System Preferences" click checkbox 1 of row 8 of table 1 of scroll area 1 of group 1 of ...


4

I've used Idea Netsetter Dongle and shared my internet over the Wifi. First connect to the Internet with Idea Netsetter 3G Open System Preferences > Sharing Select the Network which you want to share ( In your case it's Ethernet Adaptor ) Select the network(s) which you want to share the internet to (In your case Wifi) Don't forget to switch you're ...


4

I agree with Gordon. The 802.1X security measures are in place for a reason. You should contact your IT team to see if they have other options for you or if they can set up a guest network. In the absence of that, I would recommend getting a MiFi from your carrier or turning your smartphone into a wireless hotspot. If you have access to LTE, it may be faster ...


4

It is not possible to use OS X's internet sharing feature to create a WPA- or WPA2-protected network [through v10.7 Lion, see below]; WEP (40- or 128-bit) or no encryption at all are the only available options. Note that the original title on this question ("Airport supports WEP but not WPA?") was a bit misleading, as this is only a limitation on wireless ...


4

tcpdump is a command-line utility to see the traffic on any network interface. It is full-featured, but can require some serious reading of the man page. Wireshark is a full-featured application that will allow you to see all such traffic. It provides a GUI (X-windows based) into which you can specify filters on traffic and collect statistics. See more ...


4

I don't think you can do this. Thunderbolt doesn't really have a "native" protocol like Firewire or Ethernet, it's just fancy PCIe transport. It might be possible in the future, but it would require Apple to add the functionality. However it's worth noting that it's unlikely Thunderbolt would speed up your connection at all. Unless you have a seriously ...


4

The chflags efficiently blocked InternetSharing from touching my configuration file, but caused a detected error: com.apple.InternetSharing[1976]: dhcp_config_create: Unknown error: -1 Hence bootpd didn't start at all. By studying the processes spawned by InternetSharing I finally build a way to circumvent this systematic and stupid overwriting of ...


4

InternetSharing does log which address gets a DHCP lease within: /var/log/system.log Technically it is the bootpd daemon which does take care of this part of the network access. You can track who is getting access to your network now with this command: tail -f /var/log/system.log | grep 'bootpd.*\[en.\]' You can display who connected and when to your ...


4

This is indeed quite broken in Mountain Lion. Once you've fixed up the default route as you describe in the question, you're still left with the problem that Mountain Lion is giving its bridge interface address to clients as both the router address (which is correct) and as the DNS server address (which isn't). Verify that this is the problem by entering an ...


4

I found the answer to my particular issue. The reason that my iPhone could not subscribe to a published Outlook .ics calendar was because the MIME type of the .ics file was wrong. As recommended in this brilliant post by Joe Bradford, I went into IIS, changed the MIME type from application/octet-stream to text/calendar, and iPhone could connect and ...


4

I have experimented with using ControlPlane to achieve what you want. My preliminary result is that it will do what you want. ControlPlane detects changes to your system called 'evidence sources'. Changes are evaluated with 'rules' which define a change in 'context'. Associated with each context are 'actions'. One of the 'evidence sources' is a ...


4

The option is not available because you have selected to share your connection from Wi-Fi. You can't share your connection from Wi-Fi to Wi-Fi. Use an alternative method of obtaining a connection to the internet (e.g. Ethernet) so that the internet connection can be shared over Wi-Fi.


3

Try this... Sharing your Internet connection - http://docs.info.apple.com/article.html?path=Mac/10.5/en/8156.html Your mac will basically create a WiFi network for the iPad to join and then it will share traffic from the ethernet connector/PPPoE/cable. Your mac's buit in help might be newer than the link I provided, so check there first. Also, be sure you ...


3

Yes, it's called "Personal Hotspot" by Apple and works on iPhone 4 and 4S. Here is an Apple support doc on it. Not available on the 3G iPad though, as far as I know.


3

Even with multi-homing on iOS 7 starting to allow traffic over LTE and WiFi simultaneously, there isn't a good way to accomplish this on OS X Mavericks and lower. I have run Link Aggregation on macs since 10.4 and it's really nice when you have a gigabit switch. You will need a switch that runs LACP and two physical ethernet ports like is typical on G4 ...


3

I finally figured it out. You said your Firewall is off. You should double-check. This will definitely cause Internet Sharing to not work. System Preferences -> Security & Privacy -> Firewall. In the "Sharing" panel, change your Computer Name to something simple. Instead of "Elliot's MacBook Pro", use "MBP". Turn off Internet Sharing (if it's on). ...


3

arp -a gives a list of connected interfaces on the same network. en1 is Wi-Fi en0 is Ethernet (on the Macbook Air this is Wi-Fi) How to use Type this command in the Terminal located at /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app. To learn more about this command, type man arp in the terminal.


3

InternetSharing is performing 2 tasks: dynamically providing an IP address to devices connected on the secondary network interface (bootpd) managing the IP addresses translation (NAT) for these dynamically attributed addresses (natd on Snow Leopard & natpmpd on Lion) InternetSharing doesn't let you configure a MacOS X as an IP bridge. See man ...


3

Actually, there is a bind process started after activating internet sharing: 22.12.12 09:21:01,687 named[23072]: starting BIND 9.8.3-P1 -c /etc/com.apple.named.proxy.conf -f The config in /etc/com.apple.named.proxy.conf forwards dns requests to reasonable DNS servers. The problem is that the named daemon doesn't stay alive. There are times were it stayed ...


3

AFAIK iDevices MUST use Wifi for internet accesss. So No USB. iDevices can provide an internet connection only when Personal Hotspot is enabled (So it's only for Cellular iDevices). In this only case you can use USB for internet connection.


3

Sorry: I'm a bit short of time and so this isn't a complete answer, but hopefully it gives you a starting point. From the answers to this question, it seems that /usr/libexec/InternetSharing creates /etc/bootpd.plist when Internet Sharing is turned on, and removes it again when it is turned off. I think this file is the cause for the ifconfig values you ...


2

I'd suggest you follow the excellent blogpost by Rodrigo at http://rodrigo.sharpcube.com/2010/06/20/using-and-sharing-a-vpn-connection-on-your-mac/ Worked for me.


2

Since Dmytro said that the answer from superuser worked, I'm posting it as an answer here... First, try entering the proxy settings for your connection into the iPhone. You can do this by going into the Settings app > Wifi > Wifi network name > Proxy (which is at the bottom). Note, you cannot specify a .pac proxy file like this on the iPhone. ...


2

If you can access the Internet successfully on your Mac, you can share it to your iPhone. Your Mac just essentially acts as the router. So make sure you can access the net successfully on your Mac first. Then go to Sharing and turn on Internet Sharing, choosing to share the Ethernet connection via the Airport. Now connect to the adhoc network that's been ...



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