Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

16

This is a technology called Hyperthreading those i5 chips support. It means two threads can run simultaneously on each core resulting in two additional virtual cores. OS X's Activity Monitor only shows virtual cores, not physical cores. Likewise, a quad-core chip has eight virtual cores and that's what's presented in Activity Monitor. To sum it up: 1 CPU ...


15

There was an emulation layer called Rosetta to allow Intel Macs to run PowerPC applications that Apple provided from Mac OS X 10.4 to 10.6. Sadly, they removed it in 10.7 Lion and it no longer works. Given that you said your iMac is brand new, it presumably came with Lion preinstalled, and is unable to run anything older. So, unfortunately, the answer is no. ...


15

Hardware-wise: PowerPC is a microprocessor developed mainly by the three developing companies Apple, IBM, and Motorola. It is built with reduced instruction-set computer (RISC) which speeds-up the operation of MIPS (million instructions per second). PowerPC is mainly based on IBM’s earlier Power architecture because it has a similar RISC instruction set for ...


12

Here is no simple answer. IMHO the question is not about 0.4 Ghz. (btw it is 17% above 2.3). The real questions are: do you have external USB or any other backup solution? no - consider buy an external HDD first! yes, have - next qst :) have you already max. memory in your config? no - consider investing into more memory first yes, already max, ...


10

PPC Macs refers to the generation of Macintosh computers created in the mid to late 1990s through to 2006 that used PowerPC RISC based chips made by IBM or Motorola. That last PowerPC based Macintosh, the PowerMac G5 stopped being sold in August 2006. The latest version of Mac OS X a PowerPC chip enabled computer was able to run was Mac OS X 10.5 (Leopard) ...


8

Looking at your memory usage you don't need more RAM. To answer your questions: Apps may open faster if you are running lots of heavy duty apps, like Photoshop, Xcode, etc… I doubt you'd see much of an increase in the FPS in games. That depends on the video card and how well the game is written. Overall performance increase would probably be minimal. The ...


7

There is a solution: Use Snow Leopard. It comes with rosetta which is an emulation layer for PPC apps. If you use Lion there is also a solution: Use Snow Leopard: To achieve a dual system configuration use either VirtualBox, VMWare Fusion or Parallels Desktop for Mac. Install Snow Leopard on a virtual machine. Install Rosetta and your applications. Run ...


7

Yes, you can install a shell. You can also setup a firmware password, though you generally use utilities that run under Mac OS X to set it up (Apple include's Firmware Password Utility on the install DVD, but does not actually lay it down on the system partition). EFI is probably less interesting from an hobbyist perspective than OpenFirmware was. Even if ...


6

When it comes to Apple hardware, the differences between the last generation of PowerPC and the first generation of Intel were fairly minor, as far as the end user experience goes. They used the same form factors, and the all-new internals were quite effectively hidden by the unchanged exterior and the accommodations the operating system made for ...


5

Xcode will make good use of many cores - especially when running the simulator, unit testing at build time and just coding / compiling / searching documentation. Also check to see if the processor with more cores has a higher speed boost when only one core is running. The rated speeds are controlled more by thermal conditions under full or benchmark loads ...


5

One option would be to clone your startup drive to an external disk using something like SuperDuper! or Carbon Copy Cloner. Then you can use System Preferences->Startup Disk to select that external drive as the boot drive. Once you've rebooted and are running the system off the external drive you can use Disk Utility to run the repair. After you're done, ...


4

Looks like you have all you will need already, you were just missing the following bits of information. You should checkout a Ubuntu instructions for Intel Macs, so no need to worry about a BIOS your running EFI. Ubuntu for Intel Macs and additionally the Ubuntu Intel Mac CommunityHelpPages looks to be loaded with lots of resources that you might find ...


4

Instructions for installing Snow Leopard (and Rosetta) into Parallels 7 in Lion: http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1365439


4

there's 2 utilities that could provide that info, one from Intel called MacCPUID (http://software.intel.com/en-us/articles/download-maccpuid/) other called CPU-X (http://netkas.org/?p=72) rather outdated Hope this helps. Karl


4

The two processors in question are the i5-2415M and the i7-2620M. The nitty-gritty tech-spec details can be compared here. The main difference, besides clock speed, is that the i7 has a bigger cache and includes Intel vPro Technology which theoretically provides faster AES decryption and other magical buzzwords. Of course, what you really want are ...


3

So, a bit of a late reply, but the problem has been figured out at the Genius Bar. It turned out that the app CleanMyMac had decided to delete binaries, and picked the Intel ones instead of the PowerPC ones. I've had a good experiences with the app before, but I won't be using it again. The solution was reinstalling all the affected installations.


3

System Preferences may be running in Rosetta (the PowerPC-on-Intel emulation environment). Do a Get Info on the System Preferences app (in the Applications folder) and check two things. The "Kind" should say Application (Universal). There may be a checkbox saying something like "Open using Rosetta". Make sure this is unchecked.


3

The Intel chips at the time of the transition were sourced to be far more thermal and power efficient than the PPC chips of the time. Intel had much more room to grow within the same thermal and physical envelopes in terms of clock rate and the amount of hardware needed to support a given processor choice. The PPC roadmap was shooting for massive clock ...


3

One option that doesn't require any external drives or disks: Disk Utility's repair disk is largely* a thin wrapper over the unix fsck (stands for "File System Check") utility. You can run it by: Booting into "Single User Mode" by rebooting and holding command-S during startup. A command-line input will appear; enter /sbin/fsck -fy Wait for it to ...


3

No as VirtualBox does not emulate the CPU but virtualizies it as described by Oracle. You would need to find Virtual PC or Bochs (I have used both in the past) or others in a list from www.macwindows.com However now getting an extra second hand intel box might well be the easiest thing to do and would definitely provide the faster solution.


3

Check out the Intel Power Widget - It provides info about the processor frequency in GHz and Processor Power in W. intel download page >> software.intel.com/en-us/articles/intel-power-gadget-20


3

Well obviously, yes you can. Why would you keep them ?


3

It seems that nobody has actually bothered to read the question properly. The poster wishes to know HOW to remove the apps. The answer in most cases is to simply drag the apps to the trash. There may be some left over preference files but these will generally do no harm.


2

I'm sorry that you've had such a difficult time asking this question on Stack Exchange. I haven't been able to find a better/more up-to-date book, but most of Mac OS X is CPU architecture-independent anyway, and the book you're reading does contain an appendix that discusses Mac OS X on x86 hardware and the corresponding similarities and differences between ...


2

The speed differences aren't very important -- the big difference is that the i7 had Intel VT-D technology, which improves VM IO performance, especially if you use multiple VMs simultaneously. If you see alot of work with VMs in your future and have the money, go for it. Otherwise, the i5 is more than adequate. The i7 also has hardware AES acceleration.


2

There is no current implementation of this technology in the current iMac with the requisite Z68 chipset, or any other Mac. I'm not even sure that any other Macs from this (last?) year have the Z68 chipset!


2

Unfortunately the Intel Drivers Utility does not work with Mac OS. It is only windows based application. From http://www.intel.com/p/en_US/support/iduufaq: The Intel Driver Update Utility supports the following operating systems: Windows 8* Windows 7* Windows Vista* Windows XP* Windows Server 2008* Windows Server 2003* Operating systems not ...


2

I've used http://www.freemacsoft.net/appcleaner/ for years and it works a treat at removing all the files associated with an app in addition to the app itself (but you do have the choice about which of those files you remove). For all the great things about OS X, other OSs definitely have it beat when it comes to uninstalling stuff.


1

According to this article in the Filemaker support database, you should be able to recover your data by converting the v6 database with FileMaker Pro 11 first.


1

If you are using many programs at the same time e.g many browser tabs and you are left with little free RAM then yes, you will see performance increased. It really depends on the usage. I can't work on a computer with less than 8GB of RAM (many, many chrome tabs, iTunes, and 3-4 programs open at the same time). But many people are OK with 4GB.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible