Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

2

No need to uninstall the current version. Just download the Java 8 update 51 (JDK)from Oracle site and install manually. After installation, no need to reboot the machine. Check version in Terminal or Java panel. It will show the updated version.


2

You are not looking deep enough into the bowels of developer.apple.com. If you go to http://developer.apple.com/downloads you will find all downloads that Apple has available. Simply limit your search to the "OS X" category and you'll see downloads for all versions of OS X going all the way back to OX 10.3.


2

Running port info libgcc-devel declares it to be just what one would expect: a pre-release libgcc beta which, likewise just as one would expect, conflicts with the current release version of libgcc. I cannot help but believe the -devel installation you experienced was unintended. This is why: While it's already improbable enough that the Caffe devs would ...


1

You need to partition the drive. In the Snow Leopard installer, go to the Utilities menu, and start Disk Utility. From there, you can partition your new drive, and then you can install the OS onto it.


1

You can download recent OS X versions here as well if you don't have an apple account.


1

If you need it for an older Mac, download it on that one. No Mac OS will install on any machine newer than the OS, as the drivers for the hardware simply didn't exist at the time. If you fake it by installing on an older machine then swapping drives, it will just fail to start up.


1

The QuickTime Player 7 and QuickTime 10 apps coexist on all my Macs without causing any problems. If you're worried about overwriting QuickTime Player 10, right-click on the app, and choose Compress "QuickTime Player.app" and zip it up. If the QuickTime Player 7 installation wipes out v.10, (and I don't think it will,) then you can simply uncompress it. ...


1

If you want to get the size of a mounted block device (which is what blockdev -getsize64 does), you can use the following: diskutil information <device> | grep "Total Size" | sed -e 's/[^(]*(([^Bytes)]*\).*/\1/' If you want to do the same for a file, you can use the following (amongst many others): stat -f '%z' <filename>


1

Wish I could claim credit for this one, but I found it buried in https://github.com/chcokr/osx-init/blob/master/install.sh This worked on my 10.10 headless VM without a logged in UI. touch /tmp/.com.apple.dt.CommandLineTools.installondemand.in-progress; PROD=$(softwareupdate -l | grep "\*.*Command Line" | head -n 1 | awk -F"*" '{print $2}' | sed -e ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible