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11

Use the default (case-insensitive) unless you both a) know what you're doing and b) you absolutely have to. There are several programs (Norton Antivirus comes to mind) that won't work properly on a case-sensitive file system. HFS is, by default, case-insensitive but case-preserving (i.e. it doesn't care what you type for comparison purposes, but it will ...


9

According to iOS Forensic Analysis, the main filesystem is HFSX. HSFX All Apple mobile devices use HFSX as the file system. HFSX is a variation of HFS+ with one major difference. HFSX is case sensitive. HFSX is reported by Apple as Mac OS Extended (Journaled, Case-Sensitive). There are two main partitions of HFSX: the OS and the user data. Prior ...


6

Sorry but there is no way to reformat a Hard Drive while keeping the current data intact. You can either move the data off, reformat to HFS+ then move the data back on or add a second partition that is HFS+, move the data to that partition then remove the old NTFS partition and expand the HFS+ one.


6

The journaled file system practically eliminates the chances that the filesystem itself will be in an inconsistent state after the next reboot. But "consistent" is not the same as "correct". Before journaling, the filesystem structures themselves could become damaged which could lead to more corruption occurring after the next boot. So journaling limits ...


5

Confusion arises from the fact that the relationship between these concepts is complex and has changed over time. In current systems the difference between a named fork and an extended attribute is largely academic. For an extended attribute, the actual data is stored in the attribute data record. For a fork, what's stored is the list of disk allocation ...


5

First you should figure out whether or not compression is worth it. This depends largely on the type of content you're storing. If the content is not compressible (JPEG images, most video formats, ZIP archives, etc.), there's little benefit and the added overhead of decompression may even cause a (minor) slowdown in file access. HFS+ compression is most ...


4

One or other can break applications, case-insensitive is the default however. If you've been using case-insensitive without issues then there are no guarantees that a transition to case-sensitive will go well. Here's one example from the apple support pages: ...don’t assume your third-party software solutions work correctly with case sensitivity. ...


3

When you try to run the OS X installer it will refuse to install to a disk encrypted with FV2 and Disk Utility will refuse to partition or erase FV2 volumes. That being said, if you know your cli-fu you can destroy the partitions using the Terminal app included on the installer (which I've done, although now I don't remember if I used diskutil or just brute ...


3

The standard for Lion is GUID partition scheme with one volume HFS+ Journaled. The journaling is preferred since the filesystem can be checked in moments when the system reboots rather than running an exhaustive fcsk each time the drive is unmounted cleanly. You don't want a case sensitive file system as some programs are not ready for dealing with ...


3

It looks like you are going to need to use an older Mac to read the disks, due to the complexities involved with the variable speed drives used to format those disk, unless you want to re-program your floppy drive. I am not sure if you can do it with the Iomega drive especially since its USB, you would probably have to take it apart to do the next option. ...


3

There are two ways I know of. You can start the folder's name with a ".", as in ".folder". This will hide them on any Mac, though other Windows can see them. Or you can use the Terminal command "chflags hidden ~/Documents/folder", replacing that place with the path to whichever folder it is you want to hide. But I don't think this would hide them when ...


2

Sadly, no. Your money or your time surely will soon be spent.


2

The simple answer is that macs will read NTFS disks since Mac OS X 10.3 Panther and later. The default behavior doesn't hide any files that NTFS has marked as "hidden". You could theoretically try to install software on all your macs to ensure they respect this hidden attribute (Tuxera makes such software) The same problem will happen when you take your ...


2

Andrew, The Device / Media Name is set when a partition is created on a disk. The only way you could rename the "startup partition" would be to startup from another drive. The initial name is set by Apple. On Lion you will most likely find the following device names: disk0: The make and model of your drive You'll never change this. disk0s1: "EFI ...


2

The best option is to reboot with the option key held down. Boot from your Recovery HD and first repair the volume containing the partition you indicated, then repair the partition itself. It is unusual, but not unheard of for the verify function to not be available since the design is to be able to self-verify but nor self-repair the boot volume.


1

I am not an expert on this, but I have read a bit to try to understand what is going on. I would say "Confusion arises from the fact that: the relationship between these concepts is complex and has changed over time and Apple have implemented both program level APIs and tools like ls or cp is such a way as to hide many of the differences between the ...


1

There is a new HFS+ compression tool called MoreSpace Folder Compression in Appstore: http://itunes.apple.com/app/morespace-folder-compression/id521635253?mt=12


1

I recently installed Windows 7 using BootCamp on my MacBook Pro, Yes, I am able to access all the files on my mac HD.


1

I only know of two commercial tools: MacDrive and TransMac. They both have limited time trials to evaluate before you buy. You could also try a Live CD of GParted, it has HFS support. Update: a colleague of mine told me you can create a HFS partition with diskpart. Just make sure it's primary and use partition id af (create partition primary id=af).


1

Many factors might come into mind. A process with root privileges is the main cause. Think about an Application that you grant permissions to install using your Admin password. This Application might not have permissions set properly for certain folders that are installed in key OS location (i.e. /Library) would cause the permissions to change. Think about ...


1

The OP has probably already solved this problem since posting 2 weeks ago, but for the record, smith is right, you will have to move the data one way or another to reformat to HFS+. And it must be journaled if you want a bootable partition. Lion doesn't support FAT32 or NTFS. If you don't have room to make a second partition on the current drive to hold ...


1

".HFS+ Private Directory Data\r" and "␀␀␀␀HFS+ Private Data" are special folders used by the HFS+ filesystem to handle hard-linked folders and files, respectively. They're normally pretty well hidden, but apparently something went a little wrong and one of yours became visible. Don't worry about it, though -- as long as they're doing their jobs, you ...


1

There are some significant applications that will not work correctly with case sensitive. And there's really no reason to do it. I'm assuming since you're asking that you really don't have a reason to do it. You're definitely better off not doing it unless you have a specific reason, and don't care that many applications don't work right with it.


1

The easiest way would be to add a period (.) to the front of the filename - this will hide it in the Finder. You could also run this in terminal: chflags hidden path/to/file but I'm not sure if this will work on an NTFS formatted volume, as I've not tried it on one.


1

There is a good reason to choose a case sensitive file system. If you are concerned by the quality and the security of the applications you run you might be interested by any early mechanism which may discriminate badly programmed applications. An application which at one time create a file named conf and later try to open the same file with the name CONF ...


1

If you don't care about the data, it's pretty standard (almost doesn't quality as "cli-fu" even); from Recovery HD, you can do it all in Terminal (Utilities > Terminal) First, do a diskutil cs list to see the CoreStorage information on the volume. Grab the longish UUID of the Logical Volume Group you want to nuke (typically near the top of the output; ...



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