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6

Very interesting question! I wasn't even aware that these kind of apps exist. In order to answer your question, I decided to put one of them to the test against a chest strap heart rate monitor. (I was using a Garmin brand chest monitor similar to this one.) I was using both heart rate monitors at the same time when I performed my tests and compared their ...


5

Yes (maybe). There's an open-source kernel driver OS-X-SAT-SMART-Driver for Mac OS X that will work for some USB and Firewire enclosures. It uses SAT (SCSI ATA Translation) to pass the SMART commands through to the hard drive, so only works if your enclosure supports SAT. SAT isn't something enclosures seem to advertise support for, but the one I use (WD ...


3

I suspected that assuming you are used to checking your BPM regularly apps which rely on the flashlight and camera weren't more precise than a manual check. Event if they rely on a technique used by medical apparatus. But then I did some testing. Testing vs myself Comparing with my own readings the results seem to be consistent with a ~5 BPM margin based ...


2

Your Mac's battery hasn't reached its maximum cycle count, which for your model is 1000 cycles (see Mac notebooks: Determining battery cycle count): Other factors may decrease battery life, so double-check the battery condition in System Information.app: Open Apple menu>About This Mac>More Info… Press System Report… On the left hand side select ...


2

The operative term here is photoplethysmograph. It's the term for what your phone is acting as. Basically, your blood vessels rhythmically dilate and contract with every heart beat. This is measurable as either a change in reflectance or transmittance (depending on how the photoplethysmograph is configured. In the case of your phone, it's measuring ...



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