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MacBook Pro Retina 13", Early 2015, comes with an Intel Core i5 or Core i7 (5257U, 5287U, 5557U) ("Broadwell") Processor and the maximum temperature allowed at the CPU Die is 105° C, per Intel's documentation on these processors. (See TJUNCTION in the links provided.) So if it's the CPU Die temperature that's reaching 105° C then your Fan should be in ...


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The MacBook Pro can get quite hot and the fan may often spin at high speed and this is considered normal operation. In addition to it's fan it also dispels heat via its unibody aluminum shell. This can make the surface very hot but this is often a good thing as it is moving heat away form the CPU and other components. As long as the ball bearing does not get ...


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When you re-installed the OS, did you erase or repartition the hard drive? The Apple hardware test never found a hardware problem I had with my MacPro so it is not necessarily comprehensive. The Verbose message sounds like a "can't read the hard drive at block...." message. Which would mean a damaged hard drive. There appears to be some part of the OS ...


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Install Karabiner Search for "disable" as seen in this image Check the corresponding box Reddit Source


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I would do a SMC reset (google on apple) In addition to iStat, i have Macs Fan Control. just use iStat to DISPLAY fan speed and CPU gfx core temp Use Macs Fan Control, MFC, to control fan speed. By default, my mbp's fan will not come on, and often doesn't even when way beyond 45C! in MFC drop down menu... Right Side - Sensor-based... Change control... ...


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I have the same problem. I have returned it 3x to Apple Care, and they have replaced the battery 2x, fan 3x and Logic board, but still keeps running down, with no CPU usage. I will try the SMC reset. I did that with my Air and it worked when it had issues.


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If your screen is cracked and it is showing "lots" of colors, it means your digitizer is cracked/broken as well. AFIK, AppleCare doesn't cover accidental damage, AppleCare+ does. If you don't have AppleCare+, then you need to take it in to an Apple Store or to an authorized repair shop. All of this is spelled out clearly at Apple's service page for ...


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An line-level input, which is what your car's aux in jack is, presents a relatively high impedance to the source - generally 10k ohms. Your 'phones have a much lower impedance, typically 32 ohms for PMP phones. It's possible to distinguish between them in that way.


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Sugru - not cheap, but very good. Goes on like Plasticene/Silly Putty, dries like rubberised plastic. Flexible & waterproof, lots of different colours.


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Eventually there will be very light electricity shocks, I fixed all my cables with this tape it is very strong an the with ones are more esthetics for mac white cable. It's called RESCUE TAPE Self-Fusing Silicone Tape ~ WHITE. I got mine from Amazon but there might be other places or similar tapes.


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I have had luck using double sided tape when working my Macs. You need to buy a good brand such as Scotch. Price should be < $4 US. Although, I have never tried using this tape to hold the plastic tab on a drive.


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I definitely would not use electrical tape. Honestly, if for some reason you do not have the plastic tab that came on the HDD, then you can go without it when you replace it with the SSD. The opening is large enough you can get a finger between the SSD and the side rails, should you ever need to replace it. You can see this article for another opinion on the ...


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The 128GB and 256GB variants don't have any more chips than the 32GB model. They still have one chip, that has smaller cells and hence higher storage density, but it takes up the same volume and weight. Even if this is not true, the difference in mass is likely to be within a gram or two. It's not significant enough to note. Source: iFixit teardown for the ...


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It is totally safe. A Lightning Cable is like a powered USB. In the worst case (an iPad), it's 5 V (and 12 W), far from enough for damaging your children. The fact that if the part touching is more sensible it doesn't mean more damage. Still, if the body part that touches the connectors is more conducting, they might feel a tiny "shock", but more like when ...


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You should be more concerned about the brick (the one that plugs in to the outlet) rather than the lightning cable itself. Check the output amperage or wattage, the higher the value, the more "shock" you'll get. For iOS devices, those values are quite low. You'll get a shock (more like a surprise), but not severe.


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It should be very safe, if not harmless, for your children. Reason being, the lightning connector puts a charge though at 5V with a negligible amount of amperage (not going to break out the ammeter to find out). What causes electric shocks is the amperage, the higher the more lethal. As mentioned in the thread, the amount of volts helps the charge travel ...



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