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By default NTFS volumes are mounted read-only unless you have enabled NTFS R/W either by third-party driver or OS X built-in, where applicable, which is disabled by default in versions that actually have NTFS R/W capability. BTW Apples NTFS R/W is disabled of a good reason so I wouldn't enable it. I use Tuxera NTFS instead. So if you don't have NTFS R/W ...


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Update 1: It is my understanding rEFIt installs in the OS X partition. According to the rEFIt documentation, it is also possible for rEFIt to be installed on a separate partition or on the hidden EFI partition. No mention of being installed on the Windows partition. Assuming rEFIt was installed using the automatic installation, then it should be saved by ...


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In a Terminal or script, you can use the pmset command to sleep/wake the computer and more. From: man pmset sleepnow - causes an immediate system sleep sudo pmset sleepnow Schedules the system to automatically wake from sleep on July 4, 2016, at 8PM. sudo pmset schedule wake "07/04/16 20:00:00" Note: I've added sudo to the above pmset commands as this ...


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Not a brilliantly helpful answer, but a resolution nonetheless. I contacted OWC's online chat tech support, who were incredibly helpful - continuing the conversation for an hour and a half - and talked me through diagnosing the problem. The tech support rep first suggested using my old boot drive, and from there, testing whether my SSD was writable via the ...


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Since I have a much newer system I couldn't accurately test with a 119 MB file as it took less then a second to copy in Terminal. So I created several much larger files, up to 2 GB, using dd and /dev/random as the source and made duplicates. I then rebooted and then did timed copies of each of the sets, one in Terminal and the other in Finder. This way ...


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go to the partition, mine was named disks03, i then went to the ERASE tab, then select security options, here i raised it to the max option which said something about the standards of U.S department of defence. once you've set the security option to max, hit erase, and it begins the purge! Worked fine for me


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UPDATE: I purchased a dual hard drive adapter for swapping with the optical bay, and installed it in my machine with the original 500GB SATA III that Apple shipped with the laptop. So far everything is working just fine, and I have two working hard drives in the machine (triple booting Lion, Yosemite, and Windows 7 via Boot Camp). The second HDD is ...


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If you're talking about ~/Library/Developer/Shared, then this folder contains all the documentation for the OS X and iOS frameworks (if applicable). This folder should not be deleted if you require access to the documentation.


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The default permission on .Trashes do not allow for reading. Use sudo du -ch .Trashes as this will give you both the total and in "Human-readable" output vs. used sectors which you'd then have to convert. Also you should not delete .Trashes, just empty your Trash. If you want to take a graphical look at the contents of the disk use Disk Inventory X, you ...


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The problem turned out to be the PMBR. My first attempt was to copy sector 0 off a GPT formatted memory stick. Examined that with fdisk and it had partition of type EE, but start and end cylinders were the same. I edited partition 1 and accepted defaults. fdisk on mac will report "can't get exclusive access to write sector back, reboot required" It ...


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I recieved "Partition map check failed because no slices were found.” from Disk Utility but perhaps for different reasons. I had to reMOUNT (either it's a "right-click" or a button) the partition from Disk Utility and then Repair the partition. Then it worked - heart attack / data loss averted.


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Quick and easy: Find and dedust the system DVDs, bring the optical drive back to live by removing the crumbs inside and install Mac OS X 10.5.5 (Leopard). ;-)


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I just installed a new 500GB SSD on my MacBook Pro 17" (early 2011) and used Carbon Copy Cloner to clone the contents of my current hard drive to the new one. This works well if you have a working hard drive already in your Mac; and you should clone the drive before installing the new hard drive. You can connect the hard drive externally to your MacBook Pro ...


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OSXDaily has a wonderful guide to creating a bootable USB drive for Yosemite, the most recent version of OS X. This will allow you to install the operating system on your new hard drive. You will need two things: 16GB flash drive A copy of "Install Yosemite", which you can download for free from the Apple App Store This guide will also walk you through ...


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You could see about getting a quote from a data recovery team to attempt to reverse engineer your situation. Since you are fairly certain that the key is 12 characters long, that significantly reduces the number of passphrase that must be attempted to unlock the volume. Also, paying a professional to do this means you are only renting the equipment and/or ...


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I had the same problem as you, and i searched all the forums and i found that if you turn off FileVault it should work.


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USB 3.0 supports UASP which allows for TRIM Re: enclosures - If you're using an external enclosure, the chipset must be able to pass through TRIM commands to the drive. So without that, everything is a moot point. And when connected in this manner, I would venture the drive would probably not even be recognized by the system as an SSD. Question - can't ...


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Though the following should be valid for non-encrypted volumes and unlocked encrypted volumes, it doesn't help much because the main volume here is encrypted and locked. So skip to FileVault2-encrypted volumes Non-encrypted volumes Almost no free space on your start volume is a problem. At least 10% free space are recommended. It's indeed possible to ...


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You will need to create an installable USB drive which you can boot from, follow these steps carefully to achieve that: Download the Mac OS (Yosemite) from the App Store Format a USB in Disk Utility and name it Untitled (very Important) You should format your USB to Mac OS X Extended (Journaled) launch Terminal and type or copy and paste this command ...


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Question re-asked because of lack of input. Got some clues. Found answer related on discussion of ntfs-3g (though problem was not related to ntfs mounting). See https://github.com/osxfuse/osxfuse/issues/119


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This problem has been described on the ntfs-3g github page. It appears to be related to OSXFUSE: https://github.com/osxfuse/osxfuse/issues/119. There are a couple suggested remedies, including removing OSXFUSE, and using an older unsupported program with similar functionality, or else downloading and compiling OSXFUSE from the source (apparently the bug was ...


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As mentioned by the other comments, Apple's default partition scheme is to have everything on ONE partition. While not recommended (potentially due to not being easy to do), it is possible to move a home folder to a different partition. Here is how: Create a partition to use for the home folder (Disk Utility is the built-in choice to do so) enable the ...


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Actually you have a CoreStorage Logical Volume Group on your physical disk named "Macintosh HD" containing a Logical Volume also named "Macintosh HD". The latter is the volume usually visible on your desktop (depending on your Finder settings). The Logical Volume Group already extends across your whole physical disk except an invisible EFI partition (200 MB) ...


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I have done a similar thing with a 13 inch macbook pro 2012. I put a Samsung 840 EVO 120GB 2.5 inch Basic SATA Solid State Drive into the hdd bay and moved the hdd to the optical drive bay. Works great and much faster booting etc. From memory, I don't think it's an issue using a SATA III (6Gb/s) in a SATA II (3Gb/s) environment or vice versa, it's just ...


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My first thought would be that it is a permissions error of some kind… Either the Drive is formatted as NTFS or ExtFS etc The System doesn't have write permissions to the device itself For the first, the simplest, if not cheapest solution would be something like Paragon NTFS or ExtFS or Tuxera NTFS If it is a pure permissions/ownership issue, then for ...


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I wouldn't suggest continuing to use an external drive for your MBP, apart from anything else it's just not practical. It seems like your internal drive has or is just about to fail. Have you/can you check it's SMART status from disk utility? Either way, I would suggest not worrying about trying to verify or repair it - just try and get your important ...


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It depends upon the OS X version you are using. If the Late 2011 and Late 2009 HDD have Yosemite, then you are good. But if Late 2009 has other than Yosemite and 2011 has Yosemite, then some apps will refuse to run.


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Think of it as the chain is only as strong as its weakest link. Yes, there is. You need to look at the specs on the speed of each of your drives. Check in the About this Mac in your toolbar and go to more info, System report, the the sata section under Hardware. In terms of the optical and main drive bay's, it doesn't matter which you use if both are ...


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I had this exact same problem. My SeaGate GoFlex was working great, but then mysteriously disappeared from Finder and couldn‘t be repaired in “Disk Utility.” What finally worked, after opening up “Activity Monitor” application, I noticed there was a “Seagate Utility Gauge” process running. After Googling that, I noticed other people were uninstalling it. ...


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Yes. According to this document Macs that can run either Mountain Lion or Mavericks are good for Yosemite. The oldest MacBook Pro you can use is therefore Mid/Late 2007. So in any case you should be fine. OS X Mavericks: System Requirements: To install Mavericks, you need one of these Macs: iMac (Mid-2007 or later) MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, ...


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You need this: http://support.apple.com/en-us/HT201250 Main thing: you need any other hard drive, whatever ssd, hdd, connected to mac by wi-fi, thunderbolt or usb. Time Capsule is just one of the many variants. You can make your backup on any device that you already have. But make a note that it better should be fully given for backup, no any other sided ...


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If you have a spare 8GB (or bigger) USB drive (or an external hard drive, or even an unused partition on your internal hard drive), you can download the Yosemite installer from the App Store and use it to create a bootable Yosemite installer. Here are Apple's detailed instructions for doing so.


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"I would like to know if hard drive access speed is a bottleneck to my system currently." Of course! There are two aspects to a disk storage system: Bus speed Storage medium speed On ANY given bus, e.g., SATA, SATA2, SATA3, a mechanical HDD will be an order of magnitude slower than an SSD for a given link speed. The secret is to always use an SSD that ...


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With Yosemite, we're noticing an somewhat, but not totally, subjective slowdown to all aspects of the OS, despite the minimum 4GB RAM. At our school we are actively replacing any faculty member's MBP's internal HDD with a SSD if they complain of 'slowness' and they can demonstrate it concretely. This can be in the form of a slow startup; slow-loading apps; ...


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Yes. You will need a thunderbolt cable, boot the new computer in target disk mode, and use something like Carbon Copy Cloner to do the job. Copying via the recovery partition is also possible, but fiddlier.


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As for the Yosemite bootable disk, it should be possible to make one from the Yosemite installer app - Be sure that you have downloaded it, not installed it. I think 8Gb should be enough actually. For the stubborn Partition, I like to use Linux for this. Any Linux Distro should be suitable, because it has GParted most of the time. Format the stubborn ...


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Try diskutil cs rename lvgUUID "newName". You will need a lvgUUID(Logical Volume Group): diskutil cs list.


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If the machine still boots, go to the App store and "purchase" Yosemite (its free). Now boot the machine holding COMMAND R and boot to internet recovery. If you see a poorly animated spinning globe instead of an Apple logo then you are on the right track. Now you have can reformat the whole drive and do a clean install of Yosemite.


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I don't know any upper limit, but after checking more carefully, in mine I have 1 x 3TB 3 x 2TB 1 x 1TB [SSD in the spare optical bay, wired down into the 'secret' extra SATA slots]


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First reset the SMC: Shut down the computer. Plug in the MagSafe power adapter to a power source, connecting it to the Mac if its not already connected. On the built-in keyboard, press the (left side) Shift-Control-Option keys and the power button at the same time. Release all the keys and the power button at the same time. Press the power button to turn on ...


0

Orphaned inodes, are common, but they do normally get cleaned, latest after a restart. This is not a bug, it's the journaling clearing up a normal situation. An "orphaned" inode in this context is one which has been explicitly deleted, but which was still open by some process when it was deleted. The file vanishes completely from the directory ...


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It's most likely that some program (probably uTorrent) is configured to access /Volumes/external_drive/. When the disk is ejected, that folder is deleted, but the program is re-creating it (because that's its configured location to store files), thus triggering the problem. The only solution I know of is to make sure the program (again, probably uTorrent) ...


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System Management Controller (SMC) Reset the SMC by following the instructions below, that should restore the power to the port: 1.Shut down the computer. 2.Plug in the MagSafe power adapter to a power source, connecting it to the Mac if its not already connected. 3.On the built-in keyboard, press the (left side) Shift-Control-Option keys and the power ...


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Buy an SSD instead of an HDD if you can afford one. Believe me, you'll thank us. You currently have a MacBook Pro with a fast Intel processor but an extraordinarily slow hard drive. Your failed hard drive was your computer's main performance bottleneck. Replace it with a fast SSD from a reputable manufacturer like Samsung or Intel, and your computer will ...


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You may be able to do Internet Recovery by pressing Cmd+R during startup. If that is possible, then: Install the new HDD. Boot to Internet Recovery. Enter Disk Utility. Create the installation partition. Exit Disk Utility and choose to Reinstall Mac OS X. You can test this even with the bad HDD still in place. If your system did not come from Apple with ...


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I found a solution in this answer: How can I delete Time Machine files using the commandline I used /System/Library/Extensions/TMSafetyNet.kext/Contents/Helpers/bypass and it worked for me


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If you have chosen the SSD in System Preferences -> Startup Disk, and it is working, then you should have no problems removing the OS from the spinning drive. But first, how and where did you install the SSD? In the optical drive bay with a kit is fine, in an external case is not fine. Assuming it's internal, do this in stages. First, boot from the SSD. ...


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If you've got a functioning OS on the SSD then you should be able to set this as the boot drive in System Prefs. Boot off it and then use Disk Utility to unmount the 1tb drive. Test everything with the 1tb drive unavailable. If everything works fine without it then you can remove what you want from the 1tb drive.


0

I know this isn't exactly what you're asking for, but if you're interested, you could make your own Fusion Drive.


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With some minor skills and lots of luck you can try to repair it. While holding the Command-S restart. When it is done (if it boots) type "fsck -fy". This will try to repair your disk. You could spend $120 and get the more professional tool called DiskWarrior. In any and all cases, back up your stuff.



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