Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

Hard disk drive failure A few weeks ago I found similar symptoms with a colleague's iMac: sometimes it behaved as if no drive was installed sometimes during normal use, the Mac stopped working (not a total freeze; the reported symptoms were as if there was an I/O issue) – this was less likely to occur if the Mac was cool in FireWire target disk mode, ...


1

The reason that everyone always harps on creating a backup before running any kind of partition command is that if something goes wrong, then generally every thing is gone. I have preformed this kind of operation on PC's many times, generally it has gone well, but the two times over the years the process glitched the partition table was destroyed. Once I ...


5

Yes you can repartition without losing data. Using Disk Utility, perform a repair on your drive to make sure the drive is free of errors (even better, use Diskwarrior if you have a copy). Then unmount your drive but don't eject it. Select the drive in the left hand pane, then go to the Partition tab. On the Partition Layout section click on the "+" to create ...


0

For Time Machine to back up to a disk, the disk must be formatted as Mac OS Extended to allow for the hard links and other special metadata that Time Machine uses. However, the BT Home Hub doesn't let you share such a disk over the network (haven't tried the new 5, but I know the 3 doesn't let you). This means you need to set up a sparse bundle on the disk ...


1

Yes. Reformat and partition the HD. When you unplugged the drive, you severely damaged the directory information on the 'My Passport' partition, rendering it unusable. If there is nothing of value on the drive, this is your best bet. In addition, make sure to reformat with Mac OS Extended (Journaled) selected.


0

Usually when there's a problem with upgrading you have to "rebless" the HDD. THis often comes from a permissions problem with something on the HDD. You can open the Disk Utility and do a full permissions check to find any problems. In my experience I've found the best way to accomplish this is to create a bootUSB device using something like "Disk Maker X" ...


0

My experience with dd is that as well as the file size, the block size makes a huge difference. Try playing with the bs parameter (try 128 - 10240) and see what sort of a difference it makes. Also - a sustained 28MB/sec write speed is not all that bad for a 5-7 year-old computer. (Although if you multiply by 8 to get the speed in bits per second, you will ...


0

You will not be able to boot from an original retail copy of Snow Leopard (10.6) as your Air requires 10.6.4 or later. Your old drive should boot your Air as long as the installed OS is 10.6.4 or newer. If your old Mac is still accessible and the external drive has 10.6.8 or newer you could do worse than download the Mavericks installer and create a USB ...


1

When it's telling you to review your account I think it's just telling you to go into the Apple account settings and confirm some of your account details. Probably just wants you to enter the three digital code from the back of your card, or something like that to confirm the payment details.


0

To try and locate which files and directories are consuming the most disk space on your Mac, I'd recommend running OmniDiskSweeper. You can run it off of the DMG just fine. Select your hard drive and let it run and it'll list in descending order where the greatest disk usage is. OmniDiskSweeper: https://www.omnigroup.com/download/latest/OmniDiskSweeper ...


1

And if you do not connect your external hard drive to your laptop, then you can access iPhoto? This is how I interpret your question... iPhoto remembers the last selected iPhoto library - may be this is the problem? The solution might be: hold down the option key (ALT) and launch iPhoto: iPhoto will show you a dialog with different options: either you can ...


0

A simple shut down, then start, of OS X should automatically remove debris from /Volumes If you like: disconnect/eject any removable media before the start. Or simply leave the media in place, and restart. There may be other approaches to dealing with volume debris whilst the OS is running but in my experience, it's often better to restart. Also ...


0

Background iPhoto and external storage It's true that with a normally running operating system on a Mac, an iPhoto library can be stored on an external drive. Normal running of iPhoto will involve file system writes to the iPhoto library and elsewhere. Time Machine and the file system When Time Machine backs up to an HFS Plus file system, most of the ...


0

If you're certain the drive is known to be good and working and that the cable you're using is also in good condition then the answer is no: there isn't anything you can do to fix a broken controller yourself. You'll need to take it to an authorized Apple Repair Center. These things are usually solved with main board swaps as it's all, more or less, ...


0

I'm very excited that to say that booting Windows fixed itself. My machine: MBP 2010. OSX Fuse installed. Recent update on one OSX partition to Mavericks. My machine automatically ran its CHKDSK function and restored its own ability to boot. It found orphaned files and repaired the links. If you can figure out how to force CHKDSK to start you may find ...


0

The hard drive randomly started working again after an hour or so left alone.


0

I don't have enough points to add a comment yet. How long ago did the drive stop mounting? I am going to ask the basic questions: Have you disconnected the drive and rebooted? Do you by any chance have any other computer you can try it on? Have you tried using diskutil from the command line? This is an older post, man diskutil looks like the utility ...


0

I found an excellent article on Toms Hardware which led to my personal definitive answer. It's possibly the most concise and understandable explanation of trim, and led me to decide to turn trim on. read here: http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/macbook-pro-ssd-trim,3538.html A basic summary is this: Hard drives don't know when a file is deleted so it ...


0

If you are accessing the "Certain" application using one of the commonly used browsers each of the browsers has a setting allowing you to specify where to download. Using the "Settings" also called "Preferences" located under the Browsers name (top left) will open a window where you can set it. Example: If the certain application does not use browsers, ...


0

I can't see the speed of your processor being very relevant to whether the laptop continues to be compatible with future versions of OS X. I sold a 2008 MBP to a friend that only had 4 GB of RAM as well and a 7200 rpm HDD and it can handle Mavericks just fine. It has a Core2 Duo, with an i7 you should be set for at least 3 more years, if not 6. I hope that ...


1

According to the folks at iFixit, there aren't any compatible drives out yet. Source: https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/181479/SSD+possible+%28%29+upgrade+on+ebay#answer181496


0

Seems like you'd like the guest system to handle the whole USB thing. Because OSX automatically attaches USB devices, you'll have to do the following: Open Machine Settings > USB > Click the green plus symbol > Select your HDD. Then unplug the Disk and plug in again, from now on the guest should see it as an USB device.


0

Well, just I case this happens to someone else. It seems Yosemite (beta 1) messes up with the HDD, as Fyrefly pointed out, Apple_CoreStorage represents two disks acting as one (for speeding up a HDD with an SSD). My MacBook Pro only has one HDD so that's strange. After I deleted the recovery partition I rebooted my MacBook Pro and it died. So the only ...


1

On the other hand, I use an old 2010 Core 2 11" MacBook Air with a measly 2 GB of RAM, and it's quick enough to handle Xcode because it has an SSD. I'd say put the money on the SSD now and make sure your swapfile is going there.


1

I have a 2011 MacBook Pro 15", and upgraded it both to 8GB and an SSD. Both upgrades are extremely valuable. Since you are using the MBP for coding, I would definitely go for the 8GB. XCode et al. can use quite a lot of RAM. The SSD will also refresh your MBP immensely! Compiling will be much, much faster. As will be application startup times. Especially ...


2

I used to work with a 2009 MBP 13" with C2D 2.53Ghz, 8GB ram and 256GB SSD, it worked like a charm with development (Qt, XCode), VM (VirtualBox), image edition (lightroom). I changed it because the screen was too small but that shouldn't be an issue for you since you're running on a 17". So if you change both, you can hope at least 2 more years. I would go ...


0

The simple solution is to reformat the whole disk and reinstall Mavericks from scratch. Doing so will get your Mavericks recovery partition back and you can migrate your data back from time machine. I get the feeling you don't want to do that however?


0

There are times when Apple's 'Disk Utility' software isn't as thorough at repairing problems that other applications may be. I've had 'Disk Utility' tell me that drives are fine, but it is not until after running a program like 'Disk Warrior' (that replaces the Directory structure), that the hard drive feels 'normal' again. This isn't to plug any particular ...


2

Yes: This is totally possible and you should not have any problems at all. You should consider though, that every Mac has a minimum and a maximum OS X Version which is officially supported.


0

I think most disk imaging utilities will do what you are looking to achieve. Try Partition Magic or Macrium Reflect. In fact I know for sure that Partition Magic will automatically estimate the needed and resize the space as needed based on the original hard disk (and its partition) and the destination disk.


1

I have the same problem, which I'm pretty sure is due to a combination of the way write operations work on flash memory and the way core storage (or any whole-volume) encryption works. First, write behavior: unlike volatile memory (the stuff used in the memory of your computer) or hard disks, where any bit can be written to 0 or 1 at any time, flash memory ...


0

Open your Activity monitor in the Utility folder and look for mds_stores CPU and CPU time values. The CPU should be <0.5% and time depends but about a hour. If you have higher CPU % values then your spotlight is active. If not, then you have something on the drive needing updates, or synchronization, or back up. For that look who is active, and ...


1

It's probably Spotlight indexing the drive, which is going to include full-text indices of those PDF scans if they've been OCR'd. If you want detail--to see the status of the indexing, for example, there is a handy chart at http://commandlinemac.blogspot.com/2008/12/spotlight-on-command-line.html


0

Understanding the process of events, is sometimes 1/2 of the way to a solution. When you turn on the power to a Mac, it activates the BootROM firmware. BootROM, which is part of the computer’s hardware, has two primary responsibilities: It initializes system hardware and it selects an operating system to run. Two BootROM components ...


0

You need a USB drive with a bootable OS/installer on it to test this... This is probably a long shot but, open the machine and disconnect the SATA cable that connects to your optical drive. Leave the cable disconnected and attempt to boot up the machine via USB. If everything works try connecting the SATA cable for the optical drive again and retest. My ...


0

So what I want to do is remake my partition map, like the manufacterer's default. Based on your comments, you've managed to reclaim the space from the orphaned bootcamp partition and merge it into your boot volume. Assuming disk0s2 is now ~30 GB larger, the partition map listed for your internal boot drive /dev/disk0 is the default partition scheme. ...


2

I highly recommend completely backing up the machine before attempting this, either using TM with no exclusions set, or better yet, cloning the whole drive using a program like Carbon Copy Cloner. Unmount the Logical Volume: sudo diskutil unmount force /dev/disk1 Remove the Logical Volume Group and all of its contents: sudo diskutil cs deleteLVG ...


1

The HDD cable physically attaches the internal drive (2.5'' 9mm traditionally for notebooks) to the logicboard, typically via the SATA (II or III) bus. The cable can wear out and cause I/O problems, such as you've as described. Here is an image of the cable via iFixit. I added brief descriptions: Using iFixit, identify your machine's model and find the ...


2

Testing cabling is more of an empirical exercise. First you disconnect and reseat both ends of the cable. Next, you put in the new cable and if the problem goes away it was the cable. If you suspect the cable on an intermittent problem you replace the cable and leave it in after reseating doesn't reduce the frequency of the issue. I'd start with reseating ...


0

I believe the issue to be that the controller is still SATA III for the optical bay, yet the connector is a SATA II type, as is the cable. So if you try and place a SATA III enabled drive in the optical bay, it will try and negotiate at SATA III speed (6G). This creates an issue as the cable is not setup for this and the crosstalk, and very low SNR at that ...


0

Firstly, it does not seem to really matter whether you use the Sata II or III port. For most usages you won't see the difference, cf this post for details: http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/280002-32-sata-sata-practical-difference. Given that the disk shows up fine via a USB interface it means that it's not at fault so it could actually be due to the ...


2

Use the command line tool mdutil. For example, say you connect an HFS+ journaled volume named "LEAVE_ME_BE" Use the following command to disable indexing of the volume. If ownership is enabled, running as sudo may be necessary: sudo mdutil -i off /Volumes/LEAVE_ME_BE Check indexing status of all connected volumes: mdutil -s /Volumes/* Read the man ...


1

A file called .metadata_never_index place in the root of any volume will suppress indexing behaviour. You can generate this file automatically the following files need to be created as root the following shell script will create the requisite file should an active (less than 30 days old) spotlight entry not be found. /var/root/unindex.sh to create ...


0

If the formerly-free space is showing up as 'other', the implication is that your current system partition is perfectly OK? I would recommend to start with, booting from the Recovery partition, and doing a 'Verify Disk' and/or 'Repair Disk' on the system partition. Is the 'other' space actually a partition, or is it free unpartitioned space on the drive? ...


0

Yes, you are correct. /Volumes/(name) is the mount point. Mac OS Extended (Case-Sensitive, Journaled) is the best case-sensitive option. I'm assuming you know what you're doing with case-sensitive partitions. The biggest disadvantage, maybe, of creating a separate partition is that you can't use Boot Camp if you have more than one partition on your startup ...


0

If it's an early-2013 model, Other World Computing offers an aftermarket upgrade. Otherwise an Apple Repair Center can order any part (and therefor also a bigger SSD for any MacBook). However the so-called "stock" price which applies for things like these is rather high.



Top 50 recent answers are included