New answers tagged

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Use Internet Recovery on your Mac Mini and try repairing Macintosh HD with Disk Utility. If that fails to fix the boot issue, connect your Mac Mini in target disk mode to a mac running OS X 10.8 or later and see if you can at least copy the files off your Fusion Drive. In the future, set up a Time Machine.


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As a proof of concept, I formatted a USB Thumb-drive using a GUID Partition Map and formatted it Mac OS Extended (Journaled) naming it "Encrypted". Then in Finder I selected the disk named "Encrypted" and control-clicked selecting Encrypt "Encrypted"..., while setting its password to "password". When it was done encrypting, using Terminal, I ascertained ...


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Solved by formatting the Time Capsule drive and reconfiguring Time Machine on the Mac.


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The MacBook 13" Mid 2007 is obsolete! Meaning that even with the latest version of Mac OS X it supports, 10.7.5, the OS is no longer supported in any respect, has un-patched security flaws that will never be fixed. From a security standpoint, you'd be better off running a current version of Linux Mint then Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5 on that MacBook. That said, ...


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You can install OS X using either a Snow Leopard installation disk (which should have been included with the computer–however you'll need 10.6.8 to go further, as earlier versions contain no online-only upgrade path) Or: With a thumb drive that has been set up to install OS X. You can easily create these thumb drives using instructions in Create a bootable ...


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What is the capacity of your flash drive ? More than 8GB ? If yes then NTFS will do. If you want to use your flash drive on Windows, only FAT32 or NTFS will be nice. If you haven't download yet, there is a lot of software that allow OS X to write into NTFS partitions. Like TUXERA NTFS or Paragon NTFS.


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exFAT is the only format which will work for you as it will allow files greater than 4GB and work on Windows. Disk Utility can format using exFAT.


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By default, Macs format all drives with the GUID partition scheme (GPT). A particular feature of GPT is the EFI system partition, which on a Mac defaults to 200 MB in size. The EFI partition is also FAT32. Windows supports GPT just fine, but it does not support multiple partitions on a USB flash drive. Windows will only see the first partition, which is ...


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I found that this worked for a USB drive to erase and format it as HFS+ with journaling. sudo diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ 'My disk name' diskX Where X is a number. First run sudo diskutil list to find the relevant disk3, etc - check the size and make sure it's the right disk!


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have a look at: http://www.mac-forums.com/apple-notebooks/273332-2nd-internal-hard-drive-ejects-sleep.html It seems to be the caddy.


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You didn't specify which browser you are using, so I assume Safari. Two options come to mind: Right-click on the file you want to download and download directly to a destination you select Open Safari Preferences (in the Safari menu) and select a different download destination in the General tab


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The proper command to resize your main volume to completely fill your disk is: diskutil resizeVolume disk0s2 0 Usually you have to enter a size like 249g but 0 acts as a magic number and resizes to full size (fit to fill) while moving Recovery HD automatically.


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This is really terrifying that the only answer suggest to overwrite your gpt table. The correct and safest solution, with explanation, is from this comment. download GParted-Live CD from http://www.gparted.org/download.php boot from this CD accept the suggestion to enable the full disk reboot from mac OSX try again – now you can resize it! Explanation: ...


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I am a computer repair technician of many years, working on macs, windows systems, linux systems. I personally have great success in cloning mac disks using the following technique: Download and boot off of a Ubuntu liveCD. (Same as their install disk, use the 'try ubuntu' option.) open terminal. sudo bash (you're now at a root-level prompt) ...


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Both About this Mac and df seem to agree that you have 91GiB used, 21GiB free on /, which adds up to the volume of your 112GiB (120GB) hard drive. The problem must be with the list of files Disk Inventory X scans. Run du -s as a superuser starting from / and then going deeper into the filesystem to get a more accurate picture of your disk space usage. ...


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I suggest using a tool like Space Gremlin to identify files eating up your disk space. https://itunes.apple.com/de/app/space-gremlin/id414515628?mt=12 http://www.spacegremlinapp.com/


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Did you check your "About this Mac" and the tab "Other"? All the files that are not in one of the listed categories. This article talks about what is other and how to clean your mac safely


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What I did was format my disk, Then it popped up with the questioned folder I was confused, and after hours of rebooting and holding alt/options and command R/P I just went to where it said install OS X again. Verified it with Apple again. (Press continue). And now I'm playin The waiting game for my computer to restart and hopefully get back to normal ...


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This article is talking about this: “Other” Storage Space: The big monster of Mac OS X Some examples of the files that may be cataloged as 'Other': Archives and disk images, including zips, dmg, iso, etc Personal documents, contacts, calendar data Items in the OS X folders such as the System folder and caches App Plugins or extensions File types not ...


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In specific. Thunderbolt can carry USB but USB cannot carry thunderbolt. In general, as long as your Mac has any Thunderbolt connector, it is highly likely you will be advantaged to connect over thunderbolt instead of using USB. For my money even Thunderbolt 1 is superior in many ways to the best USB 3 chipsets we have today. Now - the above statement is ...


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Hover your mouse over the large grey box and below it will show the path to that file. Most likely it is your local TimeMachine backup data. OS X will keep TimeMachine backups local to your system so that you can do faster restores or if your main TimeMachine system is not available. From the Apple Menu, select System Info and then click the Storage tab. ...


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To finish this question: I had opened a bug report with Apple. They determined that a botched Aperture photo library migration lead to excessive disk I/O. In the end, I reformatted the whole Mac. Plus to make the machine more useable, I attached a 256 GB Thunderbolt SSD and created a FusionDrive, as per this blog (in german). There are lots of howtos ...


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I booted into Internet Recovery Mode, erased the entire hard drive, and re-installed Mac OS X. This will reinstall the OS that came with the computer, recreate EFI and Recovery Mode partitions, and set CoreStorage volumes as if everything is set from factory defaults. After this Recovery Mode works as expected.


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Remove all external disks (just for safety reasons). If possible also remove all internal disks except the boot disk or "refresh" your backups. The proposed command (dd) used improperly can be deadly for your data. Open Terminal.app and get the disk identifier of the disk containing the DVD partition: diskutil list Unmount the disk: #replace diskX by ...


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I'd recommend putting your old drive in a USB enclosure. Then, you could simply hold option on boot and boot off of this old drive without issue. This would save you the effort of having to take the computer apart every time you'd like to boot off of the old operating system -- and this won't have any impact on your newer drive and OS. It'll even make it ...


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Since I am currently using a 20-inch, Mid 2007 iMac, I am somewhat familiar with upgrades. When I installed Snow Leopard, it ran as a 64 bit operating system. I have installed every version of OS X since Snow Leopard without any problems. I am currently running both Yosemite and El Capitan. I have run Vista 32 bit, Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 64 bit, even ...


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Your plan seems solid. You should be able to just swap your HDD with a SSD and install the most recent OS version. But I would recommend to download the installer for 10.11 from the App Store first and make an USB installer. How do you do this is explained here in detail or in short use this terminal command with an 8GB USB stick plugged in. sudo ...


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Your CoreStorage Logical Volume Group is missing a Physical Volume with the UUID DDD40234-2DC7-44B2-BE95-D9C0FA46F96A. Your internal drive probably is (or worse: was) a Fusion Drive and the SSD part is missing. The SSD is either damaged or has to be reseated, if it doesn't show up entering diskutil list or if it shows up: the internal structure of the LVG ...


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You should be able to reliably lock the disk (in fact these are two disks: one physical and one logical) by first ejecting the unlocked, encrypted volume and then ejecting the base disk containing the Logical Volume Group: Usually a mounted and unlocked diskutil listing looks like this: /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME ...


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This is a flaw in the CoreStorage encryption system. When you first connect the physical disk, the volume is in state Locked. Once you enter the password, the volume becomes Unlocked. (you can actually see the state of your volume from diskutil list) The problem is that CoreStorage does not lock a volume until it is physically removed from the system. My ...


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Running Diskutil in command line mode is pretty much the same as running it in the GUI and that is the right way to go: select the disk and click on repair. Or do it the way "perhapsmaybeharry" indicated. Either should work. If that fails you may need to try a dedicated disk repair program (I use Diskwarrior but there are others that work well too). Likely ...


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The answer is "yes." I want to install a new Solid State Drive (SSD) into the Mac. Can I just build in the SSD, start the MacBook in Recovery Mode and install OS X from there on? OS X Daily has a good write-up about it. I have done this personally on several MBPs. One caveat to keep in mind is that it will install the latest version of OS X that is ...


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Hold down the Command ⌘OptionR keys at startup to boot to OS X Internet Recovery. From there you can at least install the OS X that came with your computer. You may be able to install the latest version of OS X that you purchased through the Mac App Store. See "OS X: About OS X Recovery" for more details. Before installing OS X, you may need to run the Disk ...


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It all comes down to your convenience. The MacBook Pro (MBP) uses a proprietary interface for their SSD; PCIe 2.0 x4. This is why they are so expensive as you have noticed. Upgrading the SSD in the MBP to a larger SSD, whether you get it at time of purchase or you get it later on, is going to be an expensive proposition and the only reason that you do ...


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I also chose a minidrive to upgrade my storage. But i bought mine on TheMiniDrive and it works great. I think is the simplest solution and if you need more than 128GB they can provide the device. Ask through email. Mine is 256GB


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If I understand your question correctly you try to install OS X on some Windows laptop. Or migrate a VM to bare-metal. Besides the fact that installation of OS X on non-Apple hardware is not covered by the EULA it will not work out-of-the-box! The drivers included in OS X are made for/adapted to Mac hardware and usually don't work with some arbitrary ...


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From Terminal: diskutil eraseVolume exFAT AAA disk0s4 where AAA - name of the new exFat partition, which you can delete in Disk Utility


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Boot to Recovery Mode (hold cmdR while booting). In the menubar open Utilities -> Terminal. Now change your working directory and go to /Volumes: cd /Volumes List all volumes: ls -l Move to your main volume cd name_of_main_volume Now you can move forward to a directory to remove files and folders with cd folder_name. Appropriate paths to remove ...


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Ah, these are core dumps. You can find more information on why they happen and how to prevent them here. In a nutshell, they are generated for debugging, but shouldn't be kept on disk by default. Either the system setting is wrong, or some buggy process is choosing to save them. Running sudo launchctl limit core 0 unlimited in Terminal will disable the ...


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If you're able to boot to the installation drive (external USB, DVD, etc.) but not able to boot from an internal drive, that indicates a hardware problem, likely with the drive or the cable attached to it. An easy test is to attach your internal hard drive externally with something like this. If it boots fine externally, you can be fairly certain that ...


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In Disk Utility find the HDD you are trying to format in the left hand column. Select the disk and not the volume - that appears as child under it - to repartition it. Just choosing the volume erases or replaces the file system but not the partition table type. This may apparently fail if the partition map is mal-formed. If you feel confident with ...


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I have had luck using double sided tape when working my Macs. You need to buy a good brand such as Scotch. Price should be < $4 US. Although, I have never tried using this tape to hold the plastic tab on a drive.


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I definitely would not use electrical tape. Honestly, if for some reason you do not have the plastic tab that came on the HDD, then you can go without it when you replace it with the SSD. The opening is large enough you can get a finger between the SSD and the side rails, should you ever need to replace it. You can see this article for another opinion on the ...


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This can even be done in Time Machine: Choose the 5 TB HDD as only Time Machine backup drive (OK, my disks are smaller 😉 ): Then exclude your internal drive by adding it to the excluded items - the backup drive is excluded automatically: The final result: You get a folder Backups.backupdb with one folder vm (the name of my Mac) containing folders ...


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I had a similar problem and the following the method of the link below helped me. https://perrohunter.com/repair-a-mac-os-x-hfs-partition-table/#comment-127930


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The error message may indicate that the SSD contains an MBR which can't be properly repartitioned to a GUID partition table. I recommend to dd the partition table with zeros: Boot to the thumb drive Get the number of blocks of the drive with #get the device node of the SSD (probably /dev/disk0) diskutil list #replace diskX by the device node you got in ...


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Since you are booting off a Recovery/Install USB you should have no problems erasing and partitioning your drive for use in your MBP. There are a couple things that could be the issue here: The drive is defective. It doesn't happen often but it does. The SATA cable got damaged. Do you have an old drive you can try swapping the SSD out with to see if ...


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There are three ways to proceed: get a USB to sata adapter and connect the HDD or SSD and re-do the install. take the SSD to another computer to make sure the SSD isn't the problem Install a full OS onto a USB drive from recovery The last is likely the cheapest solution since you just need an 8 GB drive and some time and possibly an internet connection. ...


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The FileVault volume has to be unlocked and mounted. Then try the following: Get the device node of the falsely labeled volume: diskutil list Rename the device with: diskutil rename /dev/diskX NewName with diskX: the device node found earlier (probably disk1)



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