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4

The method to repair your disk and recover the GUID partition table is related to my answers to similar questions: HFS+ invalid number of allocation blocks and Hard drive no longer accessible. Basically you have to find characteristic strings of JHFS+ volumes, use some simple math and common sense and have some luck to fix the GUID. And don't loose sight of ...


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I would suggest, that assuming you can physically--and safely(!), taking note of the comment about voltages and CRTs--removing the hard drive and taking it apart. Most times you can get the actual platters/discs out without too much trouble and carefully smash them. Most are, I think, a metal coating on glass of some sort, so watch splinters wear eye ...


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I had the same situation two days ago, not on a RAID although I doubt that matters, and I ran Verify Disk in Disk Utility on the drive and it said "Volume bitmap needs minor repair for orphaned blocks" so I then ran Repair Disk and it cleaned it up and my free space was what it should have been after emptying the Trash and it wasn't at the time. Note: I ...


1

You could use Migration Assistant to move from the old to the newer, although OS X seems to have its own ideas about which OS are acceptable. Time Machine is also a good way to transfer files to a new installation. If these work this is probably the easiest. The ultimate tool is to use the command line tool rsync which can transfer files and also ...


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You could open up the cases and swap the HDD. This is probably the fastest way, if you don't mind using a screwdriver.


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Make a time machine backup of the new mac, then disconnect the external drive. Next, use the migration assistant and a network cable or wifi connection between the two to transfer everything from the old mac to the new one. Next, use the migration assistant on the old one to import the time machine backup from the external drive.


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It looks like it's the SATA Flex cable used in the MacBook Pro that has died. I have the same laptop and it's died as well. You can either go to the Apple Store to have it replaced for a nominal fee, or do it yourself by ordering this part.


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The difference with method 1 is that, with method 1, you're not actually converting anything. You're erasing the existing data and replacing it with an encrypted partition. With method 2, a conversion process begins, which doesn't erase data, but does take more time. The thing to keep in mind: any drive which is converted from a normal drive (HFS+) to a ...



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