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5

I just installed a new 500GB SSD on my MacBook Pro 17" (early 2011) and used Carbon Copy Cloner to clone the contents of my current hard drive to the new one. This works well if you have a working hard drive already in your Mac; and you should clone the drive before installing the new hard drive. You can connect the hard drive externally to your MacBook Pro ...


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With Yosemite, we're noticing an somewhat, but not totally, subjective slowdown to all aspects of the OS, despite the minimum 4GB RAM. At our school we are actively replacing any faculty member's MBP's internal HDD with a SSD if they complain of 'slowness' and they can demonstrate it concretely. This can be in the form of a slow startup; slow-loading apps; ...


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Thunderbolt 2 supports data rates of up to 20 Gb/sec. The newest SATA spec, V3.2, only does 16 Gb/sec. There should thus be no difference in performance between an internal SSD (connected via SATA) and an external SSD (connected via Thunderbolt).


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OSXDaily has a wonderful guide to creating a bootable USB drive for Yosemite, the most recent version of OS X. This will allow you to install the operating system on your new hard drive. You will need two things: 16GB flash drive A copy of "Install Yosemite", which you can download for free from the Apple App Store This guide will also walk you through ...


2

The default permission on .Trashes do not allow for reading. Use sudo du -ch .Trashes as this will give you both the total and in "Human-readable" output vs. used sectors which you'd then have to convert. Also you should not delete .Trashes, just empty your Trash. If you want to take a graphical look at the contents of the disk use Disk Inventory X, you ...


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With some minor skills and lots of luck you can try to repair it. While holding the Command-S restart. When it is done (if it boots) type "fsck -fy". This will try to repair your disk. You could spend $120 and get the more professional tool called DiskWarrior. In any and all cases, back up your stuff.


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If you've got a functioning OS on the SSD then you should be able to set this as the boot drive in System Prefs. Boot off it and then use Disk Utility to unmount the 1tb drive. Test everything with the 1tb drive unavailable. If everything works fine without it then you can remove what you want from the 1tb drive.


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If you have chosen the SSD in System Preferences -> Startup Disk, and it is working, then you should have no problems removing the OS from the spinning drive. But first, how and where did you install the SSD? In the optical drive bay with a kit is fine, in an external case is not fine. Assuming it's internal, do this in stages. First, boot from the SSD. ...


1

You may be able to do Internet Recovery by pressing Cmd+R during startup. If that is possible, then: Install the new HDD. Boot to Internet Recovery. Enter Disk Utility. Create the installation partition. Exit Disk Utility and choose to Reinstall Mac OS X. You can test this even with the bad HDD still in place. If your system did not come from Apple with ...


1

Buy an SSD instead of an HDD if you can afford one. Believe me, you'll thank us. You currently have a MacBook Pro with a fast Intel processor but an extraordinarily slow hard drive. Your failed hard drive was your computer's main performance bottleneck. Replace it with a fast SSD from a reputable manufacturer like Samsung or Intel, and your computer will ...


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I don't know any upper limit, but after checking more carefully, in mine I have 1 x 3TB 3 x 2TB 1 x 1TB [SSD in the spare optical bay, wired down into the 'secret' extra SATA slots]


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Yes. You will need a thunderbolt cable, boot the new computer in target disk mode, and use something like Carbon Copy Cloner to do the job. Copying via the recovery partition is also possible, but fiddlier.


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"I would like to know if hard drive access speed is a bottleneck to my system currently." Of course! There are two aspects to a disk storage system: Bus speed Storage medium speed On ANY given bus, e.g., SATA, SATA2, SATA3, a mechanical HDD will be an order of magnitude slower than an SSD for a given link speed. The secret is to always use an SSD that ...


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Yes. According to this document Macs that can run either Mountain Lion or Mavericks are good for Yosemite. The oldest MacBook Pro you can use is therefore Mid/Late 2007. So in any case you should be fine. OS X Mavericks: System Requirements: To install Mavericks, you need one of these Macs: iMac (Mid-2007 or later) MacBook (13-inch Aluminum, ...


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I wouldn't suggest continuing to use an external drive for your MBP, apart from anything else it's just not practical. It seems like your internal drive has or is just about to fail. Have you/can you check it's SMART status from disk utility? Either way, I would suggest not worrying about trying to verify or repair it - just try and get your important ...


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My first thought would be that it is a permissions error of some kind… Either the Drive is formatted as NTFS or ExtFS etc The System doesn't have write permissions to the device itself For the first, the simplest, if not cheapest solution would be something like Paragon NTFS or ExtFS or Tuxera NTFS If it is a pure permissions/ownership issue, then for ...


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Though the following should be valid for non-encrypted volumes and unlocked encrypted volumes, it doesn't help much because the main volume here is encrypted and locked. So skip to FileVault2-encrypted volumes Non-encrypted volumes Almost no free space on your start volume is a problem. At least 10% free space are recommended. It's indeed possible to ...


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The problem turned out to be the PMBR. My first attempt was to copy sector 0 off a GPT formatted memory stick. Examined that with fdisk and it had partition of type EE, but start and end cylinders were the same. I edited partition 1 and accepted defaults. fdisk on mac will report "can't get exclusive access to write sector back, reboot required" It ...


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Question re-asked because of lack of input. Got some clues. Found answer related on discussion of ntfs-3g (though problem was not related to ntfs mounting). See https://github.com/osxfuse/osxfuse/issues/119


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Yes, you can access the backups after changing the drives out. If you control-click or right-click on the Time Machine app icon, one of the items is "Browse other TIme Machine Disks..." from where you can select your Time Capsule backups. You can also re-associate your new drive to the old backups in Terminal with tmutil so that your backups will continue as ...



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