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7

I have the same model of Macbook which was showing the same issues. After replacing the Harddrive with an SSD I still had the same issue. It ended up being the SATA cable connecting the hard drive to the logic board. Over some time the insulation had started to wear off and the cable was occasionally shorting against the base of the case causing IO errors. ...


4

It all comes down to your convenience. The MacBook Pro (MBP) uses a proprietary interface for their SSD; PCIe 2.0 x4. This is why they are so expensive as you have noticed. Upgrading the SSD in the MBP to a larger SSD, whether you get it at time of purchase or you get it later on, is going to be an expensive proposition and the only reason that you do ...


3

This can even be done in Time Machine: Choose the 5 TB HDD as only Time Machine backup drive (OK, my disks are smaller 😉 ): Then exclude your internal drive by adding it to the excluded items - the backup drive is excluded automatically: The final result: You get a folder Backups.backupdb with one folder vm (the name of my Mac) containing folders ...


3

Boot to Recovery Mode (hold cmdR while booting). In the menubar open Utilities -> Terminal. Now change your working directory and go to /Volumes: cd /Volumes List all volumes: ls -l Move to your main volume cd name_of_main_volume Now you can move forward to a directory to remove files and folders with cd folder_name. Appropriate paths to remove ...


3

I have the same MacBook Pro. I did the following: I bought a SSD and replaced the hard drive disk. I installed OS X on the SSD. (240 GB - $100). I inserted 8 GB of RAM (replace the two 2 GB RAM) ( 2 x 4 GB - $50). Then I replaced the SuperDrive with .... the old HDD. You need to buy an adapter. (Adapter on Amazon - $30). Yes it's expensive, but it takes ...


3

exFAT is the only format which will work for you as it will allow files greater than 4GB and work on Windows. Disk Utility can format using exFAT.


2

Ah, these are core dumps. You can find more information on why they happen and how to prevent them here. In a nutshell, they are generated for debugging, but shouldn't be kept on disk by default. Either the system setting is wrong, or some buggy process is choosing to save them. Running sudo launchctl limit core 0 unlimited in Terminal will disable the ...


2

Since I am currently using a 20-inch, Mid 2007 iMac, I am somewhat familiar with upgrades. When I installed Snow Leopard, it ran as a 64 bit operating system. I have installed every version of OS X since Snow Leopard without any problems. I am currently running both Yosemite and El Capitan. I have run Vista 32 bit, Windows 7, 8, 8.1 and 10 64 bit, even ...


2

Remove all external disks (just for safety reasons). If possible also remove all internal disks except the boot disk or "refresh" your backups. The proposed command (dd) used improperly can be deadly for your data. Open Terminal.app and get the disk identifier of the disk containing the DVD partition: diskutil list Unmount the disk: #replace diskX by ...


2

This article is talking about this: “Other” Storage Space: The big monster of Mac OS X Some examples of the files that may be cataloged as 'Other': Archives and disk images, including zips, dmg, iso, etc Personal documents, contacts, calendar data Items in the OS X folders such as the System folder and caches App Plugins or extensions File types not ...


2

Both About this Mac and df seem to agree that you have 91GiB used, 21GiB free on /, which adds up to the volume of your 112GiB (120GB) hard drive. The problem must be with the list of files Disk Inventory X scans. Run du -s as a superuser starting from / and then going deeper into the filesystem to get a more accurate picture of your disk space usage. ...


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You didn't specify which browser you are using, so I assume Safari. Two options come to mind: Right-click on the file you want to download and download directly to a destination you select Open Safari Preferences (in the Safari menu) and select a different download destination in the General tab


2

I definitely would not use electrical tape. Honestly, if for some reason you do not have the plastic tab that came on the HDD, then you can go without it when you replace it with the SSD. The opening is large enough you can get a finger between the SSD and the side rails, should you ever need to replace it. You can see this article for another opinion on the ...


2

I have had luck using double sided tape when working my Macs. You need to buy a good brand such as Scotch. Price should be < $4 US. Although, I have never tried using this tape to hold the plastic tab on a drive.


1

In Disk Utility find the HDD you are trying to format in the left hand column. Select the disk and not the volume - that appears as child under it - to repartition it. Just choosing the volume erases or replaces the file system but not the partition table type. This may apparently fail if the partition map is mal-formed. If you feel confident with ...


1

Hold down the Command ⌘OptionR keys at startup to boot to OS X Internet Recovery. From there you can at least install the OS X that came with your computer. You may be able to install the latest version of OS X that you purchased through the Mac App Store. See "OS X: About OS X Recovery" for more details. Before installing OS X, you may need to run the Disk ...


1

The answer is "yes." I want to install a new Solid State Drive (SSD) into the Mac. Can I just build in the SSD, start the MacBook in Recovery Mode and install OS X from there on? OS X Daily has a good write-up about it. I have done this personally on several MBPs. One caveat to keep in mind is that it will install the latest version of OS X that is ...


1

Your plan seems solid. You should be able to just swap your HDD with a SSD and install the most recent OS version. But I would recommend to download the installer for 10.11 from the App Store first and make an USB installer. How do you do this is explained here in detail or in short use this terminal command with an 8GB USB stick plugged in. sudo ...


1

Hover your mouse over the large grey box and below it will show the path to that file. Most likely it is your local TimeMachine backup data. OS X will keep TimeMachine backups local to your system so that you can do faster restores or if your main TimeMachine system is not available. From the Apple Menu, select System Info and then click the Storage tab. ...


1

In specific. Thunderbolt can carry USB but USB cannot carry thunderbolt. In general, as long as your Mac has any Thunderbolt connector, it is highly likely you will be advantaged to connect over thunderbolt instead of using USB. For my money even Thunderbolt 1 is superior in many ways to the best USB 3 chipsets we have today. Now - the above statement is ...


1

I'd recommend putting your old drive in a USB enclosure. Then, you could simply hold option on boot and boot off of this old drive without issue. This would save you the effort of having to take the computer apart every time you'd like to boot off of the old operating system -- and this won't have any impact on your newer drive and OS. It'll even make it ...


1

If I understand your question correctly you try to install OS X on some Windows laptop. Or migrate a VM to bare-metal. Besides the fact that installation of OS X on non-Apple hardware is not covered by the EULA it will not work out-of-the-box! The drivers included in OS X are made for/adapted to Mac hardware and usually don't work with some arbitrary ...


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I also chose a minidrive to upgrade my storage. But i bought mine on TheMiniDrive and it works great. I think is the simplest solution and if you need more than 128GB they can provide the device. Ask through email. Mine is 256GB


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Yes, you could just copy it back, but it may not be bootable. That can be fixed by installing OS X over the top of your files. It should preserve what is there and make it bootable.


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First, Some Diagnostics While SSD's will give you a boost in speed simply replacing one with the hopes it solves a problem could get expensive. Let's verify that the problem is the drive in the first place and not something else. If you can log into your system, open Terminal and issue the command diskutil list You will get a listing of all your drives ...


1

What is the capacity of your flash drive ? More than 8GB ? If yes then NTFS will do. If you want to use your flash drive on Windows, only FAT32 or NTFS will be nice. If you haven't download yet, there is a lot of software that allow OS X to write into NTFS partitions. Like TUXERA NTFS or Paragon NTFS.


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You can install OS X using either a Snow Leopard installation disk (which should have been included with the computer–however you'll need 10.6.8 to go further, as earlier versions contain no online-only upgrade path) Or: With a thumb drive that has been set up to install OS X. You can easily create these thumb drives using instructions in Create a bootable ...


1

The MacBook 13" Mid 2007 is obsolete! Meaning that even with the latest version of Mac OS X it supports, 10.7.5, the OS is no longer supported in any respect, has un-patched security flaws that will never be fixed. From a security standpoint, you'd be better off running a current version of Linux Mint then Mac OS X Lion 10.7.5 on that MacBook. That said, ...


1

As a proof of concept, I formatted a USB Thumb-drive using a GUID Partition Map and formatted it Mac OS Extended (Journaled) naming it "Encrypted". Then in Finder, I selected the disk named "Encrypted" and control-clicked selecting Encrypt "Encrypted"..., while setting its password to "password". When it was done encrypting, using Terminal, I ascertained ...


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You will diagnose that you have a serious disk problem by looking at /var/log/system.log and more specifically with: grep disk /var/log/system.log These error messages will clearly show if your disk is producing I/O error on the same location, which will indicate a disk problem, or on multiple locations which will indicate a bus or logic problem. I ...



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