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5

Yes you can repartition without losing data. Using Disk Utility, perform a repair on your drive to make sure the drive is free of errors (even better, use Diskwarrior if you have a copy). Then unmount your drive but don't eject it. Select the drive in the left hand pane, then go to the Partition tab. On the Partition Layout section click on the "+" to create ...


2

I used to work with a 2009 MBP 13" with C2D 2.53Ghz, 8GB ram and 256GB SSD, it worked like a charm with development (Qt, XCode), VM (VirtualBox), image edition (lightroom). I changed it because the screen was too small but that shouldn't be an issue for you since you're running on a 17". So if you change both, you can hope at least 2 more years. I would go ...


2

Yes: This is totally possible and you should not have any problems at all. You should consider though, that every Mac has a minimum and a maximum OS X Version which is officially supported.


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Testing cabling is more of an empirical exercise. First you disconnect and reseat both ends of the cable. Next, you put in the new cable and if the problem goes away it was the cable. If you suspect the cable on an intermittent problem you replace the cable and leave it in after reseating doesn't reduce the frequency of the issue. I'd start with reseating ...


2

Use the command line tool mdutil. For example, say you connect an HFS+ journaled volume named "LEAVE_ME_BE" Use the following command to disable indexing of the volume. If ownership is enabled, running as sudo may be necessary: sudo mdutil -i off /Volumes/LEAVE_ME_BE Check indexing status of all connected volumes: mdutil -s /Volumes/* Read the man ...


2

I highly recommend completely backing up the machine before attempting this, either using TM with no exclusions set, or better yet, cloning the whole drive using a program like Carbon Copy Cloner. Unmount the Logical Volume: sudo diskutil unmount force /dev/disk1 Remove the Logical Volume Group and all of its contents: sudo diskutil cs deleteLVG ...


1

The HDD cable physically attaches the internal drive (2.5'' 9mm traditionally for notebooks) to the logicboard, typically via the SATA (II or III) bus. The cable can wear out and cause I/O problems, such as you've as described. Here is an image of the cable via iFixit. I added brief descriptions: Using iFixit, identify your machine's model and find the ...


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A file called .metadata_never_index place in the root of any volume will suppress indexing behaviour. You can generate this file automatically the following files need to be created as root the following shell script will create the requisite file should an active (less than 30 days old) spotlight entry not be found. /var/root/unindex.sh to create ...


1

I have a 2011 MacBook Pro 15", and upgraded it both to 8GB and an SSD. Both upgrades are extremely valuable. Since you are using the MBP for coding, I would definitely go for the 8GB. XCode et al. can use quite a lot of RAM. The SSD will also refresh your MBP immensely! Compiling will be much, much faster. As will be application startup times. Especially ...


1

I have the same problem, which I'm pretty sure is due to a combination of the way write operations work on flash memory and the way core storage (or any whole-volume) encryption works. First, write behavior: unlike volatile memory (the stuff used in the memory of your computer) or hard disks, where any bit can be written to 0 or 1 at any time, flash memory ...


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It's probably Spotlight indexing the drive, which is going to include full-text indices of those PDF scans if they've been OCR'd. If you want detail--to see the status of the indexing, for example, there is a handy chart at http://commandlinemac.blogspot.com/2008/12/spotlight-on-command-line.html


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Yes. Reformat and partition the HD. When you unplugged the drive, you severely damaged the directory information on the 'My Passport' partition, rendering it unusable. If there is nothing of value on the drive, this is your best bet. In addition, make sure to reformat with Mac OS Extended (Journaled) selected.


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When it's telling you to review your account I think it's just telling you to go into the Apple account settings and confirm some of your account details. Probably just wants you to enter the three digital code from the back of your card, or something like that to confirm the payment details.


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According to the folks at iFixit, there aren't any compatible drives out yet. Source: https://www.ifixit.com/Answers/View/181479/SSD+possible+%28%29+upgrade+on+ebay#answer181496


1

On the other hand, I use an old 2010 Core 2 11" MacBook Air with a measly 2 GB of RAM, and it's quick enough to handle Xcode because it has an SSD. I'd say put the money on the SSD now and make sure your swapfile is going there.


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The reason that everyone always harps on creating a backup before running any kind of partition command is that if something goes wrong, then generally every thing is gone. I have preformed this kind of operation on PC's many times, generally it has gone well, but the two times over the years the process glitched the partition table was destroyed. Once I ...



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