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If Windows is having trouble opening various folders and is causing your drive to freeze, it suggests that the file system is corrupted or that the disk itself is failing. The first thing you should do is run chkdsk on the drive from a Windows system to correct any errors with the NTFS file system. If you still have trouble, I suspect that there's little you ...


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I have never, and I mean never, even back to the "classic" Mac O/S days (going back to system 6) partitioned a drive into smaller chunks. Performance gains were supposedly about different parts of a rotational drive being faster than others (EG quicker seek to sectors near the physical hub). There may also have been some O/S speed gains in some O/S if you ...


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Ok you've got iLife for free, and installed which means you have: Pages, Numbers, Keynote, iPhoto, GarageBand. I suspect that this adds upto just under 5GB. Delete them from the application folder if you don't need them. This is the link to grandperspective, it's free and really great. And as I said in the comments Xcode is big 3-5GB, the iOS Simulators ...


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I had this problem too, the best thing you can do is replace the harddrive since it will eventually break beyond repair. Macs are quite sensitive to faulty hdd's so there is a good chance you can still use the drive as external drive and get your data from it. so: Replace the drive yourself if you can (ifixit) or have it replaced Get a hard drive enclosure ...


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Quite simply, SSDs do everything faster. Their downside would appear to be a limited read/write cycle lifetime, but so long as you're comprehensively backed-up, I wouldn't see that as an issue. Adding a Samsung EVO 1TB as the boot drive to my Early 2008 Mac Pro has given it life I didn't know it had left in it.


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It seems that i did it using this post Unable to Resize Partitions and your comment. Although it wasn't obvious for me, what I did was this: diskutil corestorage resizeStack LOGICAL_VOLUME_UUID 0G 0G to expand it to the maximum available space that is free. diskutil corestorage resizeStack can provide with info.


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This will work with the right toolkit (see links below) since the system software (Mac OS X) is almost hardware-agnostic, especially if you use a newer system than the original one. Actually some of the different MacBook Pro Mid 2010 models were sold with the same hard disks (the 500 GB serial ATA). The only thing you may have to adjust is the screen ...


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I would try to mount your hard drive via "target disk mode". This will require another computer but works much better if possible. Support page for transferring files via target mode. http://support.apple.com/kb/PH10725


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I've seen this happen a few times in the district i work for. We have almost 13,000 macs total. What I usually do is boot the machine with the bad hdd into target disk mode by holding the T key at startup. Once its in target disk mode you can plug it into another mac via thunderbolt and it should show up in Finder. If it doesn't show up in finder then open ...


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You're using Apple's RAID which means you need a device which just hosts the discs and then your new laptop will see them and use the existing RAID structure. This rules out NAS. AS these are existing RAID arrays you can't simple merge them together to create a single new RAID. At least, you can't while keeping the data on them. Essentially, in one device ...


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I just tried three new hard drives and a 2006 Macbook wouldn't recognize any of them making them impossible to format with the OS X 10.4.6 Install discs. (The installer thought they were 7.26 TB disks, which wasn't correct, and it would give an Input/Output error when trying to format.) Tried a 10.6 (Snow Leopard) Install disc and it recognized the drive ...


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If you don't need to use this USB disk on a Windows machine, format using Mac OS Extended (Journaled). Should you need to exchange files with Windows machines, then Format as you have with MS-DOS (FAT). ExFAT should work as well. It is not outside the bounds of possibility that the drive itself has gotten zapped somehow and is damaged, thus not operating ...


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The problem that I see with "almost every article" is that they're 3-4 years old. Some of them even mention attempting degaussing the drives as a means of clearing out data. That implies a lack of understanding of how Flash storage works in the first place. Seriously. Degaussing? "ATA Secure Erase" is a means of telling the drive to zero out all the blocks. ...


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On Windows, you need drivers in order to have everything working fine. In this case, the bootcamp should install it for you right after Windows installation. It installs all drivers: trackpad, graphic card, webcam, USB 3.0; as well as some bootcamp utilities that allow you to use the F10, F11, F12 as volume keys for instance. If you didn't get this part ...


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If the USB hub is bus powered (it doesn't have to plug in to a wall socket) then the problem is that your Hard Drives are drawing too much current. USB Standards state that each USB port needs to be able to output 500mA. When you divide that by four (assuming your USB hub is 4-port), you get 125mA, which isn't nearly enough to power two hard drives. I ...


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As to what I'm aware, an SSD does not classify as a hard disk, therefore it will not go to sleep as part of this option. (I'm not even sure you can make them go to sleep to begin with.) Using a laptop with an internal SSD as its only form or storage will make this setting of no use. However if there is say an external HDD plugged in, it will abide to this ...


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Finally figured this out. It was pretty simple in the end. Here is a summary of my problem and the solution. Installed Yosemite on my SSD Enabled Trim (oops!!) Rebooted and got grey screen with crossed out circle Rebooted into Recovery Tried Time Machine Backup, which failed Installed Yosemite on backup drive partition Couldn’t erase / partition ...


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Sorry, no. I am not aware of any utility, Mac, PC, Linux, whatever that will allow you to convert a RAID volume to another type while adding more disks to the mix. Your only option is to back up your data, and set up the RAID that you need to, which will wipe the drives. BTW not sure if Apple supports RAID-10 out of the box, perhaps someone else who knows ...



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