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26

I don't have numbers to back up the statement, but using HFS+ non-journaled is a good idea in certain volumes that require absolute speed, without worrying (too much) about a possible "data loss" or "data corruption" in case of power failure or similar. When is using HFS+ Non-journaled a BAD idea? External (USB, FW, ESata) drives that are connected and ...


23

You can use the dd command to make a bit-perfect clone of a drive. It's a command line tool that ships with OS X. In order to make the clone perfect you'll need to ensure the source and the destination aren't actively in use. To prepare for the clone I recommend creating a secondary boot disk that you can boot from. Your source for the clone should be an ...


23

Your best bet is to not "defragment" SSD storage. The life span of the drive is a function of how the controller decides to write data and how much of the capacity is held in reserve to hide small errors over time. An SSD in general will wear out due to write exhaustion before a hard drive will as the magnetic media can withstand several orders of magnitude ...


22

HFS, the filesystem Mac OS X uses (technically HFS+) has a number of built-in measures that reduce fragmentation of the drive. First, it uses extent-based allocation, which is just a fancy way of saying that it writes multiple contiguous blocks of data a time (and therefore inherently has less fragmentation of data). Second, it uses delayed allocation, ...


20

Carbon Copy Cloner should do the job. CCC (Carbon Copy Cloner) creates a bootable backup, and preserves all your files, and in the right hierarchy. You can also have incremental backups (it only backs up items that have changed since the last backup). You can schedule CCC to backup regularly. CCC also has the ability to backup over a network. I also like the ...


18

Generally speaking, you do not need to defrag HFS+. While it is possible to fragment it, the implementation in the OS X kernel includes a number of features that tend to limit fragmentation, including deferred block allocation and hot banding. Unless you do something really odd (constantly keep the drive over 99% full while doing lots of reads and deletes) ...


17

FAT Fat is definitely off the table since it only supports files up to 4GB. So you won't be able to transfer files over 4GB like you stated in your question. exFAT exFAT won't have this limit since it's capable of supporting files up to 16 exabytes (16.000.000 terabytes). It's an excellent format for your flash drives and/or external (not internal!) hard ...


15

Most people will tell you Macs don't suffer from disk fragmentation, citing technical arguments most people don't understand. It's somewhat true: since there's nothing you can do about it without spending $20 on something that might not improve the performance of your computer at all, you could instead focus on other maintenance tasks and just buy a shiny ...


15

I disagree with Randolph's Answer. If anything, the article says exactly the opposite of the "good performance for a while" part. What we found was the exact opposite: an OS that doesn't appear to be affected by SSD performance degradation And I don't have Apple's SSD. I have an OWC on a Mac Pro and haven't had any performance degradation since I ...


14

Most of the difference you're seeing is due to Time Machine's "Local Snapshots" feature. When Time Machine is turned on but the backup device isn't available, it backs up to the local volume. The space used for these local snapshots is counted as "in use" by Disk Utility and System Information, but not the Finder (see the Disk Space considerations section ...


14

No, it's only recommended when unplugging the cable. The reason why you eject is so that any processes reading and writing from the disk will cause OS X to notify you of the disk being in use and prevent data corruption that can occur by just unplugging the disk while it's in use. Additionally the OS might queue different write operations to a cache before ...


14

Here you are some major points: Reinstall your Mountain Lion. Don’t run benchmarks on your new SSD Benchmarks usually write a lot of data to the disk (to test the write speed), wearing it out. So it is the best way how you can ruin your SSD even before you start using it. Don’t do it. Enable TRIM OS X supports TRIM only for Apple-supplied ...


13

I can only give you an overview of my own personal experience with the process and hardware I used. Alot of this is copy pasted from my posts on the thread related to this on macrumors.com. Here goes: I bought the ebay optical bay caddy linked here. Works great. Depending on your model, I would recommend using the "Optical Drive Replacement" guide on ...


13

MacBooks are fine to be transported when in sleep mode. When a MacBook goes into sleep, it takes 20-30 seconds to save the current state to the HDD, while this is happening you'll see the status light shine brightly. Once it goes into a slow pulse, the MacBook is asleep and the HDD is inactive so there is no risk to the HDD from normal movement in a bag ...


13

It is possible, although not from Apple themselves. A company called OWC seem to specialise in SSD upgrades for macbook's and have upgrades for your model available here These particular upgrades offer greater speed and capacity to some of the stock apple SSD's from 2011.


12

FAT32 (called MS-DOS (FAT) by Disk Utility; a filesystem originally released in 1977 and updated a few times since, lastly in 1996) really is the only cross platform filesystem that is going to work fully out of the box with Windows and Mac OS X. Be careful though, if you are using Disk Utility to format the drive, you should make sure to choose the Master ...


11

From the DropDMG manual: Sparse bundle disk images appear as a single file but are actually stored as a folder with many files inside. This makes it more efficient to back them up using Time Machine or other backup utilities, as only the changed parts need to be copied. Additionally, sparse bundle disk images work well with the Compact ...


11

John Siracusa's detailed Lion review covers the new FileVault disk encryption feature in great detail: http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2011/07/mac-os-x-10-7.ars/13#lion-file-system To summarise, the new system is "volume" based. This means that not all volumes can be or are encrypted. The Lion recovery partition for example is not encrypted. Non Mac ...


10

Shirt Pocket's SuperDuper is a nice app, but it is pricey. $28, free trial available. One of its good features: It allows you to perform an incremental backup that only updates what's changed.


9

Yes. FileVault2 is volume based so you can have an encrypted Mac OS volume and an unencrypted Windows bootcamp partition for instance. The Recovery partition is also not encrypted. FileVault2 requires Lion to decrypt/decode the drive. It doesn't work with Windows Linux, or previous versions of Mac OS X. I recommend John Siracusa's Lion review for more ...


9

If your goal is to completely wipe all data which is on your current boot disk, then follow the procedure below. Insert the Mac OS X CD. Restart the computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press and hold the "C" key to start up from CD. When the Installer screen appears, do not click Continue. Instead, choose Installer > Open Disk Utilities. ...


9

This is quite old, but still works perfectly under Lion, I'm using it for several partitions: http://hints.macworld.com/article.php?story=20060930150059172 Fast path: find the Macintosh HD volume UUID: while your Macintosh HD partition is mounted, open Terminal.app and type diskutil info /Volumes/Macintosh\ HD, then read the line beginning with Volume ...


9

You can use terminal to read the File System Personality: diskutil list / Look for the fields named below: File System Personality: Journaled HFS+ Type (Bundle): hfs Name (User Visible): Mac OS Extended (Journaled) If the file system is case sensitive, you will see Case-sensitive Journaled HFS in the first pasted line and Mac ...


9

I would try using rsync from the command line. rsync -av --ignore-errors /Volumes/failingDrive/ /Volumes/brandNewDrive should do the trick. Mind the trailing / at the end of the source. Rsync will not copy files it finds on the destination, so if you call it a second time it will continue where it left off.


8

Short answer: Probably Long answer: Technically speaking CCC and similiar tools do not make bitwise exact copies of volumes. There are detectable differences (for example, each disk will have different UUIDs). Having said that, I have never seen any software that depends on something like the disk UUID, but it is possible someone uses it as a part of a ...


8

I build automator workflows like this all the time. You only need two actions, and they're both Files & Folders actions. 1) Get Specified Servers. This will let you build a list of shares to connect to. If you can map it from Finder -> Go -> Connect to server, you can use this. 2) Connect to Servers. This will connect to any servers passed to it ...


8

They are pretty much the same. The only thing that differentiate SSD with a flash is the fact is housed in a big case. And the MacBook Air flash memory is attached to specific card inside the MacBook Air. To save space for starters (there is simply not any space left for a real SSD) and I thought is served better cooling too.


8

Consensus is that Apple simply forgot it - or didn't make the UI clear! Deselecting "Enable file sharing" looks to have replaced it. At the very least that will disconnect users before you pull the plug.


8

Open Terminal.app and run df -h /: % df -h / Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on /dev/disk1s2 111Gi 75Gi 36Gi 68% / On my machine my OS drive is on /dev/disk1s2. With this information you can use the Disk Utility app and find out what physical drive your OS is on: Using diskutil from command line you're OS drive will be ...


7

You can rename a file or a drive by selecting it by clicking on it, pressing "return", typing the new name, and pressing "return" again to set it. There are a few restricted characters, like :, but for the most part you can name it anything you want.



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