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Your MacBook isn't the weak link in the chain, it's your external hard disk. The 2011 machines don't support USB 3.0 so you're either using Firewire 800 or USB 2.0 - the fastest throughput you're going to see on FW800 is around 95MB/s for RAID 0 HDDs and SSD devices. More RAM will help with overall speed, 16GB is supported, but fitting an SSD and using it ...


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If your drive is corrupted in any way you probably don't want to use it for backup purposes any more, unless the data is not of great value to you. Apple does not allow an easy transfer from drive to drive regarding backups. I think this is due to the way TimeMachine works (As stated in this apple discussion thread) Now how to do it anyways ? I would ...


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From Turn Off Requests To Use New Disks for Time Machine [OS X Tips]... You can stop this request dialog box from appearing by opening a Terminal window (Finder -> Applications -> Utilities – > Terminal) and typing the following: defaults write com.apple.TimeMachine DoNotOfferNewDisksForBackup -bool TRUE Then log out and back in again for the changes to ...


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Just let it sit - I have the same EXACT situation and while I was researching online, it just "popped up" and was available. It seemed like my good computer was trying to fix the bad computer first, before it mounted as ext hd. Hope this helps.


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The only limit would be with the format/filesystem the operating system uses. You should be fine to put in whatever size drive you want, as long as it physically fits and uses the correct interface (e.g. SATA vs PATA).


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There are quite a few causes for the SBOD (spinning beach ball of death), but you'll have to narrow them down to figure out what you need to do. Possible Reasons: You are maxing out your CPU You are maxing out your RAM Your hard drive is full You have malware Now, with what you put in the question, I think the most likely answer is that your hard drive ...


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I suspect Windows` chkdsk or another Microsoft tool to erroneously repairing the partition table of your device containing the EXFAT volume. The result of sudo gpt -r -vv show /dev/disk2 of my 4 TB device created in a VM and formatted with Disk Utility in comparison looks like this: gpt -r -vv show /dev/disk2 gpt show: /dev/disk2: mediasize=4000655081472; ...


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I can speak from experience - I've got a 32GB USB drive, 8GB of which are a Yosemite installer and 24GB of which are normal storage. It works perfectly!


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You could do worse than to try dupeGuru, available from Hardcoded Software, I've had very good results with it. It presents numerous options for fine-tuning your search and will perform byte-checking comparisons. In addition to the standard dupeGuru there is a music edition as well as a picture edition for more specific media searches. It's free so give it ...


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To solve the problems we have to place the HDD on the original place. Then we place the SSD to the SuperDrive place. Just install Yosemite as usual and everything is working now.


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You've selected the Master Boot Record option. Only 4 primary partitions are allowed. disk2s5 and disk2s6 are actually extended partions. You cannot change the name conversion via DiskUtility. If you select GUID Partiton Table option, you'll get this: $ diskutil list disk2 /dev/disk2 #: TYPE NAME SIZE ...


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You can try unchecking "Put the hard disk(s) to sleep when possible" on System Preferences > Energy Saver (source). There's also an app that says it will give more detailed control called (appropriately) "Keep Drive Spinning" here is a link to the developer site, the app sends you to macupdate for the download –be careful with bundled software on the ...


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Yep it'll be compatible, your HDD is a SATA II. But because of the SATA2 limitation (~300MB/s) you won't be able to use your SSD at full speed.


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Yes, that drive will work for your Macbook. However, keep in mind that your machine uses a SATA II interface. This means that the maximum throughout is 300 MB/s. Though SATA III drives, such as the one you link to, are backwards compatible, there’s no benefit to spending the extra money. You are better off finding a SATA II SSD. Either way, you will notice a ...


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I have that same model and have a 240GB SSD from OWC in it. Have had for probably two years. It works very well and since you just need a 3G model you can get one for like $125.00 or so.


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Open up activity monitor and check your RAM usage. If it's high pressure (check the graph), or even swapping files, you will benefit from more RAM. Any computer will benefit heavily from installing an SSD. Expect everything to go 10x faster (not kidding). Also, it will make you not having enough RAM less of a problem, as it will speed up your swap. So it ...


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The TRIM command was introduced to facilitate “garbage collection” of deleted data, allowing the SSD to reset those “unused” blocks back to an “empty” state. This allows for better performance for many SSDs. All Chameleon does is hack your SSD to enable TRIM. What the hack does is basically tell the OS that the non-Apple SSDs in the system are Apple drives ...


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In my opinion "TestDisk" hosed your GPT. Please compare the TestDisk result with my disks. The disks in my example are equally sized, disk0 contains a CoreStorage partition and disk2 an old-style JHFS+ partition. I'm using two separate disks because it's unknown (at least to me) which formatting type (CS or JHFS+) was used originally. The PMBR/GPT and the ...


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I just made an installer image for OS X 10.10 to install in a virtual machine and it's only 5268873216 bytes or 4.90702 GB in Base2, in Base10 it's 5.27GB. So you could have made it smaller. Not sure if you can resize it, you can try and if not delete it and start with a smaller partition. BTW There does need to a just a bit of free space as it's written ...


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Yes, you can replace the hard drive in an iPod Classic. There is no need to replicate anything on to the drive as all the OS is stored in firmware separate to the drive. Once there is a blank drive in the iPod the firmware will take over. Instructions are here at iFixIt. Mounting the Classic to take a backup is another question entirely. Since you can't ...


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Copying the entire drive is a really bad idea for several reasons. Copying it to the cloud is also a bad idea. Buying a new TB or larger drive is far cheaper, faster, and easier and would let you just start backing up and put the "corrupt" backup on the shelf until you're sure you don't need to recover any files from it. Due to the hard links that are ...


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There are three ways to handle corrupted Time Machine backup drives: (easiest) Forget about the backup. It's a backup - you are not losing anything. Just erase it and start again. Copy the final backup (or just the parts that are really important) to other media. This can be done in the Finder, and it requires about the same space as what is currently on ...


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The only conclusion I can draw at this moment is that OS X Yosemite does not support hard drives larger than 2TB. Very wrong. Yosemite supports drives up to 8EB (exabytes. Or 8 million terabytes. You could download the internet with some room left over). What it has problems with is proprietary file formats from other companies, esp. if the patent ...


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If you happen to have a thunderbolt cable and a spare mac you can try your luck with target disk mode. Target Disk Mode is a feature that allows a Mac to act as an external hard drive. Connect the two computers with a FireWire or Thunderbolt cable. Start up the computer to be used as a disk in target disk mode: If the computer is off, start it up ...


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disk0 - visible in the pic and the output - is the recovery system you booted to in Internet Recovery Mode and it's no real disk in the sense of a HDD or SSD. All other disks (disk2 - disk11) are related to this recovery system. Essentially your HDD, the SATA-controller or the SATA-cable is dead. You may open your MacBook Pro with this guide or another one ...


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Based on your "diskutil list" it looks like your partition map is gone. This will most likely warrant data recovery options. You could try using Data Rescue (http://www.prosofteng.com/datarescue4/ or something like it) and Target Disk mode to scan it yourself - if you have a second Mac. But if the disk is physically failing (which it appears to be), the ...



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