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31

They use a format called H.264. YouTube and other video sites deliver content in this format also (so that their videos are viewable on iPad/iPod touch). One advantage of H.264 is that hardware based encoding/decoding can be used. See also Steve Jobs's Thoughts on Flash H.264 is one of the formats for video support in the latest version of HTML, HTML 5. ...


6

Nivas said all there's to know about H.264, the format used by YouTube to stream video. But that's how the video is encoded and decoded and it's used by flash, iOS (iPhone operating system) and HTML5. The real difference is how the request for the video is done. In a nutshell, iPhone requests it the same way HTML5 and Flash do but grab the answer from ...


4

YouTube also has HTML5 players - they recently changed their embed code to an iframed method which allows HTML5 and Flash to be shown depending on your browser setup, which the iPhone supports. Essentially, the Flash player is a way of playing a video file, so the file is available in a readable format (as Nivas was saying) that the iPhone/iPad can open in ...


2

I regularly watch MKV files with H.264 1080p video on my retina MBP 15" (late 2013, Intel GPU only), and up until now, I did so using the latest version of VLC. Unfortunately the battery drains pretty quickly with this setup and I decided to investigate alternatives. In trying to be a little scientific, I created a spreadsheet listing the CPU time used ...


1

Give MPV a shot. The project is located on github if you wish to compile your own version. Information on compiling can be found here. It aims to cut out the legacy code of mplayer and bring together the benefits of mplayer2. The result is quite impressive, though still in its infancy for OS X. Unofficial builds can be found here. I am testing ...


1

Apple's own apps on OSX has video acceleration support for years, provided by the GPU. h.264 hardware video acceleration is available to 3rd-party apps via the Video Decode Acceleration Framework since OSX 10.6.3. See: http://developer.apple.com/library/mac/#technotes/tn2267/_index.html ...


1

Using Handbrake 0.9.9 (64 bit) on OS X 10.8.4 with iTunes 11.0.4, I encoded the same movie using the AppleTV 2 preset and the iPhone's. It successfully encoded the movie, generating two .m4v files on my desktop. I couldn't, though, Add To Library nor drag and drop into the library. They would play fine in QuickTime. The solution was dead simple, rename ...


1

If you're using an Apple TV to play this content on the TV I share your pain, and the time to convert everything is also a pain! This is an alternative suggestion, not an answer to your question. If your main goal here is to simply watch the content, and you'd prefer not to have to rip, then perhaps XBMC to simply view it may be a better option for you (it ...


1

The solution I use for converting MPEG2 from DVD image or EyeTV recording to iPod-friendly MP4 H264 is based on HandBrakeCLI, the command line interface of HandBrake. It is also possible to use FFMpeg. The settings are much more complex but offer much more freedom. I spent some time figuring out what are the best options for me, then I put it in a bash ...


1

This won't work for .avi files (at least it didn't for one I tried), but for .mp4 or .mov files, it should. To list a file's codecs: $ mdls -name kMDItemCodecs "/path/to/some/file.mp4" kMDItemCodecs = ( "H.264", AAC ) To find files that are movies, but don't have the H.264 codec: mdfind "kMDItemContentTypeTree == 'public.movie' && ...


1

When you upload a video on Youtube, it is converted into multiples formats, sizes and codec (not only FLV/VP6 flash video!). Doing this, Youtube can serve you the best compatible option when you request a video depending the application / web browser (mobile or not) / bandwidth you have.



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