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22

The last version of the OS to use this font as default was System 7. For Mac OS 8, Apple decided to discard this wonderful part of their brand’s identity, and commissioned David Berlow of the Font Bureau to design Charcoal. Apple actually released System 7 for free download here. Conceivably you could load up System 7 in an emulator like ...


17

There is a feature that's currently experimental called HiDPI that may do what you want. Like the retina displays on the iPhone and iPad, HiDPI mode creates a "logical" resolution that's half the current resolution on your display but uses all the physical pixels to keep the image sharp. This results in all the user interface elements appearing much larger, ...


16

You should try adjusting font smoothing globally. Open up terminal and type: defaults -currentHost read -globalDomain AppleFontSmoothing Depending if it's enabled or not you might get a message such as: The domain/default pair of (kCFPreferencesAnyApplication, AppleFontSmoothing) does not exist (which is actually good, since it tells us it's not set, ...


16

Here are the default font settings for Mac OS X as displayed by the Bresink TinkerTool utility. TinkerTool also permits the user to change these defaults, within certain parameters, as explained in the screen shot. I am posting this screen shot here because it provides a nice chart of all the fonts and sizes and how Mac OS X uses them.


15

The font you see in most places on Mac OS X is Lucida Grande. Mac OS 1-7 used Chicago, then Mac OS 8 and 9 used Charcoal


14

The font used from Mac OS X is "Lucida Grande"; in Mac OS 9, the font used for menus and window title was "Charcoal," but it could be changed from the preference panel.


12

Try clear and rebuild your font cache with the following: sudo atsutil databases -remove sudo atsutil server -shutdown sudo atsutil server -ping The above is "my standard answer" to font problems. After your reply i tried download the font to. Installed it and in the Terminal.app got the same result as you. So +1 to the question - i'm interested too. ...


12

Mail has lacked the ability to set a default outgoing font via its Preferences since at least 10.4. Users who really need this, often switch to Outlook/Entourage or Thunderbird. There are also some plugins, such as Universal Mailer or Message Font that can do this.


12

My personal favorites are the Bitstream Vera Sans Mono derivates like Menlo and DejaVu Sans Mono: Espresso Mono doesn't have an italic face, Mensch doesn't have bold or italic faces. Cousine and Liberation Mono are basically the same font designed by Steve Matteson. The shapes of all ASCII characters are currently identical, but Cousine was released with ...


11

The default system font in OS X is Lucida Grande, below is a screenshot that compares a TextEdit window and Finder. Also, this Wikipedia article describes all the fonts included with Mac OS X 10.7 and notes that Lucida Grande is the default main system font.


10

I don't know any easy-simple way, but (as usual) Automator and scripting can provide some help. The basic idea is: You write the text with the Keynote's default font. Select the text. Press a hotkey - this will run the Automator script and replace the font for the selected text. so, to make this work: Start Automator. Select the type "Service". At the ...


9

Unfortunately Matt Love has it wrong. I was pulling my hair out because of this issue, particularly when sending to people who use Outlook. I did some digging, and if you take a look at the message source you'll notice that Mail does not use the font-family tags around the body text. Therefore, the Mail client will default the body text to whatever it's ...


9

The system font was changed to a modified version of Lucida Grande. It was mentioned in the What's New in Cocoa presentation: The normal Lucida Grande doesn't seem to have changed: There is still this hidden preference for using a lighter text rendering style: defaults write -g AppleFontSmoothing -int 1 Quit and reopen applications or log out and ...


9

You can lighten the antialiasing system-wide in System Preferences. Go to General and at the bottom is a checkbox labeled "Use LCD font smoothing when available". This is pretty cool in theory, but Apple's implementation is... not so great. LCD font smoothing (also called subpixel rendering) treats the R, G, and B channels of each pixel as separate pixels, ...


9

Maybe this link to the documentation of Pages helps you out? Choose Format > Font > Capitalization and choose an option from the submenu. Choose Small Caps to change the text to smaller capitals with larger capitals for uppercase letters


8

You have to select one or more categories in the list


8

Font Book does in fact have a view that displays all glyphs provided by a font — just select Preview - Repertoire on the menu bar: You can also get a preview of a font using Quick Look: select a font file (from /Library/Fonts) and press space.


8

It looks like all the previous answers to this question are completely uninformed. I suggest that you completely disregard all of them. It is unlikely, for instance, that telling the document creator that what they did was faulty will really get you anywhere. First, it's likely that they did not embed fonts, yes, but there are many fonts that carry flags ...


8

Closing the gap to iOS, they ditched Lucida for Helvetica Neue all the way.


6

Better yet, open a terminal and type: sudo defaults write /Library/Preferences/com.apple.windowserver DisplayResolutionEnabled -bool YES (enter the admin password). Log out and back in, and Bob's yer uncle.


6

The character palette simply gives you access to the characters in the fonts on your system. To add something to it, you need to create a font with that character in it or add the character to an existing font. Common font creation tools for OS X are Fontlab and Fontforge. There are also some online services that may work (use Google to find them).


6

You can still use defaults: defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2StandardFontFamily Georgia defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2DefaultFontSize 16 defaults write com.apple.Safari com.apple.Safari.ContentPageGroupIdentifier.WebKit2FixedFontFamily Menlo defaults write ...


5

Serenity Caldwell wrote an article on Macworld when Mountain Lion was first released as a dev preview: Safari no longer offers an option to set default fonts and sizes (though you can upload a style sheet or force the browser not to show font sizes smaller than a certain number) You can do this via an extension called User CSS. Pretty simple, add your ...


5

Apple doesn't have an option for you to do that. However, you can try TinkerTool. You can download it at no cost. Screenshot taken from TinkerTool website.


5

Yes to all your questions. OS X’ Quartz PDFContext generator embeds fonts (unless the font forbids it, it seems). I couldn’t find any document that expressly states this (it’s implied in this bit of Pages help, for instance) but I have been sending out PDF proofs with fonts not installed on the recipient’s computer long enough to know it does. As long as ...


5

Font Suitcases can potentially hold 2 different kinds of fonts: bitmap fonts and TrueType fonts. Normally, font suitcases that hold bitmap font data are only one half of the font; to be usable you need to have the additional PostScript Outline font files (these will have an LWFN icon). Otherwise, the font suitcase can represent a TrueType font, which ...


5

This is possible, because widgets are HTML, CSS, and JavaScript based. Here's how: First, go to /Library/Widgets and find the Stickies one. Copy it to ~/Library/Widgets and name it myStickies (or something else). Close the Stickies widget in Dashboard. Now, go to the myStickies.wdgt version you copied and right-click it. Choose Show Package Contents. In the ...


5

Open the Font Book application. (It should be in your Applications folder.) Select the font you need the Postscript Name for. Select Show Font Info from the Preview Menu. ( Or use ⌘+i).


5

It's very likely to be Lucida Grande 13pt (It's the system default font).


5

You should not try to install fonts by copying them to the /Library/Fonts folder. This may cause problems. To install fonts start the FontBook app (Applications/Utilities) and use the command Add Font … in the File menu . This will activate the new font(s) and you can use them immediately without a reboot. This procedure is useful if you want to install ...



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