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23

It's a bit messy, and there is a degree of cross-overs, but the quick tour, without really going into the subfolders of these: /etc, /tmp and /var are just symbolic links to subfolders in /private. /etc generally contains configuration files. /tmp is for temporary files used by running processes (also see /var/tmp) /var is also used for somewhat ...


22

Shift-Command-G in Finder brings up a "Go to folder" dialog. Type in the name of the directory, for example, /usr/local. Finder will show the directory. I use this with Finder in 'View as Columns' While this doesn't give a browsable directory from the root directory down, I've found it quite useful.


21

Enter in Terminal: sudo chflags nohidden directoryname Whereby directory name is the name of the directory that you want to see in Finder. Reverse this by typing: sudo chflags hidden directoryname The Macintosh HD basically resembles the root directory. If you want it to appear on the desktop and in finder change this in the finder preferences. ...


18

Appplescript & iCal Open Applescript and enter the following code: tell application "Finder" delete folder "folder" of home end tell Replacing folder with the folder you want to delete, and save the file. If the folder you want to delete is outside home directory, (for example the folder /Users) then replace the delete line with: delete folder ...


15

As you've noticed, recent versions of OS X only display generic folder icons in the sidebar. So why does Dropbox get special treatment? The short answer is that Dropbox uses undocumented API to accomplish this. In non-technical speak, it's a special hack that's installed by the Dropbox application. Some curious folks on StackOverflow found the specific ...


14

autocd was added in bash 4.0. You can install a newer version of bash with Homebrew and then change the default login shell with chsh: brew install bash;echo /usr/local/bin/bash|sudo tee -a /etc/shells;chsh -s /usr/local/bin/bash After you open a new login shell (or a tab by default in Terminal or iTerm 2), echo $BASH_VERSION should print something like ...


12

It's got an NFS automounter map mounted on it, so NFS home directories will be automatically available there. Quoting man auto_master: The auto_master file contains a list of the directories that are to be automounted. Associated with each directory is the name of a map that lists the locations of the filesystems to be automounted there. The ...


12

All drives (internal, external and networked) get mounted in /Volumes. You should see a folder there with the name of your USB drive as it appears on your desktop or in the Finder.


11

Hallelujah! I figured it out. Okay, so first thing I did was create a new account, as suggested by another answer. The problem did not occur in there, so clearly the problem was limited to my account. I then went into Safe Mode into my account. The problem did not occur as well. So clearly something was loaded in normal mode but not in safe mode that was ...


11

Select the folder you want (or command + A to select all) and then press: Command + right arrow And the left arrow undoes what the right arrow did, should you want to close things back up again.


10

The command-line way: Open Terminal (/Applications/Utilities) and type chflags hidden /path/to/folder replacing /path/to/folder with the POSIX-style path to the folder you want to hide (for example, a folder on your desktop called test would be ~/Desktop/test). To unhide it, type chflags nohidden /path/to/folder. The freeware way: I haven't used it, ...


10

You can use the Finder to navigate inside the bundle, and then drag and drop the file to the 'Open file' dialog/sheet. See a more visual explanation here.


9

Is there a manual or guide to what all of the built-in directories should be used for? Like what is /home/, or /net/? Take a look at the File System Programming Guide for the most up-to-date information and at man hier in Terminal, which provides a "historical sketch" of the filesystem hierarchy (it's included at the end of this answer for reference). A ...


7

You can use xattr to write various metadata related to the "new" tags in Mavericks. John Siracusa did the heavily lifting already here. Essentially you need to write two attributes, com.apple.FinderInfo and com.apple.metadata:_kMDItemUserTags, to the files. The easiest way is going to be to get a file tagged how you want and just copy the attributes from ...


7

The default icons are stored in various locations inside /System/Library - is there a specific icon you're looking for? Finder.app (/System/Library/CoreServices/Finder.app/Contents/Resources) has the Smart Folder icons and the Burnable folder icons for example. Most of the more known icons (eg. pictures for the default folders among many others) can be ...


7

From the dialog, use Command+Shift+G. This will open a small 'Go to folder' dialog where you can type (or paste) the path that you want including paths within packages.


7

PresButan: An idiotically named solution to a spectacular UI oversight (rather apropos, eh?). It also lets you use either the backspace or delete key to delete files. I can confirm it works (just installed it). Apparently it leverages the accessibility system and uses a daemon to catch the return events. If you are on 10.3-10.5, you also have the option of ...


7

I think you are talking about iOS folder. If so, touch and hold one icon till icons begin dithering. Then drag and drop one icon on an other icon which of two you want to folder together. Your ipad will suggest you a folder name. You may change or assume that. Then push the home button.


7

Select the folder you want in the Finder. While it is selected, press Command+T. This will place the selected folder in the sidebar of any Finder window, as well as Open and Save dialog panes. Mac OS X keyboard shortcuts (listed under 'Finder keyboard shortcuts') I should add too that there's a recent folders list available in Finder. With Finder as ...


6

The Finder sidebar is designed to let you customize quite a few personal folders for rapid access. This video is great to understand the basics: Mac OS X: Using the sidebar There are many guides on the web, but two support articles can get you started as well: OS X Lion: What is the Sidebar? OS X Lion: Organize the sidebar Some people also like to ...


6

You can't put a folder in the left side of your Dock where the programs are, but you can drag a folder to the right side of your Dock. In Leopard (10.5) or later, by default, the folder will appear as a stack, but starting in 10.5.2, you have options for how the folder or stack appears. In Lion (10.7), for instance, you can select whether you want the folder ...


6

Because of a lot of complaints of people used to the Windows way, merging folders is now a feature in OSX Lion : This merge dialog will only show up if: destination folder isn't empty destination folder contents are different from to be copied one So the way to merge folders in an officially supported way is to upgrade to Lion :-)


6

Art, Do you have this working successfully? Have you tried hiding the folders using something like: chflags hidden ~/Documents Then creating a link to it such as (in Terminal): cd ~ mkdir stuff cd stuff ln -s ~/Documents I believe that this will hide the ~/Documents folder from the Finder but it will still be there so anything writing to it will ...


6

I personally use symlinks to move all of those directories under my User account. I logged in as root and symlinked all of my directories "Documents' Downloads " Movies", etc and moved them to an external drive. Mac OS sees the changes just fine and points to those directories (on the external drive) automatically and I have had no issues doing it this ...


6

As I know you can not set it to enter in a normal way (but maybe exist some tricky way) but you can change open shortcut by going to System Preferences > Keyboard > Keyboard Shortcuts tab from the left window choose Application Shortcuts and press + to add new shortcut then find Finder in Application and choose Open in Menu Title and press any desired ...


6

387,037,139 bytes is the sum of the file lengths in bytes. A file however uses whole blocks on disk, hence even a one byte file takes one block. On the partition on which I tested this, a block is 4K. The “on disk” value is the number of blocks times the block size. The difference between 684 and 716.9 is a factor of 1.024*1,024, that is the difference ...


6

I was so sick of this, so I decided to write a fix once and for all. You can use the following AppleScript to resize the column widths when you notice the column is too wide. It works by resizing the Finder window really large, then back to it's original size, triggering a fluid layout resize. tell application "Finder" tell the front Finder window ...


6

Maybe it's easier to open Terminal, go the the parent folder and run i=0 for f in *; do if [[ -d "$f" ]]; then mv "$f" my-folders$i ((i=i+1)) fi done


6

Rather than spending your time with Folder Actions (which I, and many others, have found to be unreliable), might I suggest that you give Hazel a try? http://www.noodlesoft.com Disclaimers: I'm going to start off by telling you it isn't free (it's US$28), but if you like automation, this is the place to start. There is a free 14-day trial. I am completely ...


6

There's a CLI tag tool available via Macports/Homebrew: https://github.com/jdberry/tag It doesn't seem to have a recursion option, however, I would imagine you could use this in conjunction with the standard UNIX 'find'. e.g., (from inside the directory you want to tag files in) find . -exec tag --add tagname {} \; -print



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