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If you type the following command in Terminal you will get all sorts of info on all the corestorage volumes currently attached to your Mac, including the conversion status you are looking for: diskutil cs list There are more answers here. One of my favorites is Nick Bedford's answer towards the bottom of that page that gives you just the status of each ...


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I had a similar experience with filevault 2 and apache (in El Capitan). I run several virtual host at various ports via a custom .conf file that all point to ~/Sites/xxxxx/. After enabling filevault they all went dead w/ permission denied even though file perms were 755 all the way to ~/Sites. Then I noticed :80 was still working with the default "It ...


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You should be able to reliably lock the disk (in fact these are two disks: one physical and one logical) by first ejecting the unlocked, encrypted volume and then ejecting the base disk containing the Logical Volume Group: Usually a mounted and unlocked diskutil listing looks like this: /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME ...


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This is a flaw in the CoreStorage encryption system. When you first connect the physical disk, the volume is in state Locked. Once you enter the password, the volume becomes Unlocked. (you can actually see the state of your volume from diskutil list) The problem is that CoreStorage does not lock a volume until it is physically removed from the system. My ...


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Ransomware works by selecting certain files (normally by type - like docs, bitcoin wallets, etc), encrypting those individual files and forcing you to pay up for a key to decrypt them. FileVault protects your data on your Mac by encrypting the whole disk. When you boot up your Mac, you put in a password that effectively "decrypts" the drive and allows it to ...



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