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132

If you have "Other Input Sources" available at the top right of your login screen, select the one called Unicode Hex Input. This can be used to input emoji (or any other character) into the password field, as long as you know the Unicode Hex number of the character. This number can be found in the Character Viewer or on the internet. Some items you find ...


55

I solved it by the solution Apple Support suggested to do, here are the steps I did: Install OS X on an external drive from Recovery mode (Cmd + R while starting). Boot from the external drive. Install the Hex/Emoji keyboard to be able to type the relevant character. Go to Disk Utility, choose the locked disk. Go to File -> Turn Off Encryption. Enter your ...


50

I've had a very similar issue, and so I decided to compile several methods for solving it. So, following, there are those options and some of them I got from the answers already provided here. I understand this is a little bit offtopic from the question, but it's in tune with the answers. This has many parts and those are all softwares I could try myself ...


40

Brian's answer was right on. The issue in my case was related to the backlight. Here's how I got around it: While the password dialog is up, move your mouse cursor to the top of the screen until you get an apple menu. Select "Restart" from the Apple menu Use a flashlight to shine a light through the Apple on the back of your MacBook screen and you should ...


33

There's an OS X feature called authenticated restart that stores the FileVault key in the SMC for the duration of the reboot. Apple acknowledges in the manpage that it does reduce FileVault security for the duration of the restart: On supported hardware, fdesetup allows restart of a FileVault-enabled system without requiring unlock during the subsequent ...


26

Since you have Filevault - that makes your situation precarious and a bit delicate. Some good news, Apple has disabled emoji entry in the password pane for 10.11 El Capitan - I can't paste or get emoji in the Users & Groups preference pane. Apple's official manner to get past this is to click the ? in the password field and reset your password. If you ...


23

Disk Inventory X is another excellent disk space visualizer. FileVault or any other third party software is not necessary at fault here. Mac OS X is simply a complex and modern operating system that uses disk space is dynamic and often unpredictable ways. Not only does the swapfile grows and shrinks but OS X also has a sub system that creates a Dynamic ...


22

Every time you make the computer do something extra, in this case encrypting/decrypting all file access, it will take longer and the machine will slow down a bit. File Vault 1 did slow things down noticeably, but with File Vault version 2 (Introduced in OS X 10.7 (Lion)) running on an SSD there is not noticeable decrease in reading or writing files. I have ...


21

Use fdesetup: sudo fdesetup remove -user username See: http://derflounder.wordpress.com/2012/07/25/using-fdesetup-with-mountain-lions-filevault-2/


18

DaisyDisk Credit to Sathya for his answer in Super User.


16

Download and run GrandPerspective for a nice graphical view of what's occupying disk space -- something like this: Run this before and after the reboot and you should be able to see what the big differences are.


12

No, it's not. Some say it's a benefit if you have geo-location and remote wipe configured (or other similar software) as it increases the chance that someone finding the Mac will connect it to the Internet. What's happening is that you also have Find My Mac on. That enables a Safari-only guest account which will allow users to log in and run Safari. The ...


11

John Siracusa's detailed Lion review covers the new FileVault disk encryption feature in great detail: http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2011/07/mac-os-x-10-7.ars/13#lion-file-system To summarise, the new system is "volume" based. This means that not all volumes can be or are encrypted. The Lion recovery partition for example is not encrypted. Non Mac ...


11

The previous answer I gave here was wrong (as is bmike's answer). The previous answer I gave was that if you have this as a problem, a workaround is to create an encrypted disk image that covers the entire AppleRaid set. This works, in theory, but is so horribly slow (like more than 10x as slow as the raw disk access) that it is basically unusable, which ...


11

I've always wondered the same thing: how to keep OS X from storing the WPA passphrase (or PSK) in NVRAM. Using 'nvram' I could never find the variable that I thought held these credentials. Today, I tried booting to a USB live image of Linux and running Chipsec. Its command to list EFI variables has many more results than I was getting by running nvram ...


10

Encryption happens on-the-fly. If the data was written to the hard drive, then passed through an encryption algorithm that then deleted the written data and re-wrote it, encrypted, that would be hella inefficient, and would largely defeat the purpose. I think the answer to your question is no, but of course remember that if you're going from a data set ...


10

The following works. System Preferences -> Login -> Login Options -> Check Enable Show Input menu in login window


10

Your question contains the most important thing needed to secure a computer against a motivated attack to compromise a FileVault 2 protected Mac volume. Don't connect FireWire to a device you don't or can't trust while you are logged in to an account that has file vault keys active. Pick good single use passwords to reduce the chance of other compromises ...


10

This is much easier to do beginning in Mavericks. The fdesetup command was expanded to support recovery key changes and verification. sudo fdesetup validaterecovery will prompt you for the key, which should be entered in all caps with the hyphens.


10

It turns out that Disk Utility didn’t want to touch a disk that contained an encrypted partition, but it had no issue with changing the encrypted partition itself. I clicked on the encrypted partition (not the drive) in the sidebar, and the “Erase” tab appeared on the right. From there I reformatted the disk to Mac OS Extended without encryption, and ...


10

I understand that you're running into issues, so this is going to be more for others looking for info on this topic. Encrypting non-boot volumes should be a relatively easy process in OS X 10.8.x and later. To encrypt a non-boot volume: Right-click on the volume you want to encrypt Select the Encrypt… command When prompted, enter a password and ...


9

It's not possible (at least not that I know) to specify Filevault's target dir. It will work by automatically working with your home folder by creating (if you are in Leopard or above) a Sparse Bundle (or a Sparse Disk Image if you are in Tiger). The reason for the change has to do with Time Machine (and to allow -to a certain extent- to backup a FileVaulted ...


9

There are a number of possible pitfalls to having an encrypted home folder; most of them are more-or-less intrinsic to the idea, so they're not likely to go away... ever. UPDATE: Lion's FileVault 2 uses full-volume encryption rather than just home-directory, so it actually does make some of these issues go away and changes several others. I've added notes ...


9

Password less 'Guest' accounts can no longer be created since the whole disk is encrypted than just the User's home directory. It's sad that I could not find any information on the kb article in Apple about this.


9

Yes. FileVault2 is volume based so you can have an encrypted Mac OS volume and an unencrypted Windows bootcamp partition for instance. The Recovery partition is also not encrypted. FileVault2 requires Lion to decrypt/decode the drive. It doesn't work with Windows Linux, or previous versions of Mac OS X. I recommend John Siracusa's Lion review for more ...


9

CPU load Filevault 2 supports Intel® Advanced Encryption Standard (AES). It's important to know if your Mac has an Intel processor which supports this, as it significantly reduces the CPU overhead. Search for you CPU here an look if is supports the New AES instructions. My Macbook Pro 2011 got this feature enabled via a firmware update (Apple did not ...


9

No, the backups will not be encrypted automatically, but it's very easy to enable for directly attached disks. Just check "Encrypt Backup Disk" in the Time Machine disk selection settings. If you're backing up to another Mac, you can use Disk Utility on that Mac to erase non-boot drives and put an encrypted partition on them:


9

Although I didn't run out of battery power, I had the same issue this morning on my 15-inch, Mid 2012 MacBook Pro running Yosemite final. This was not the same laptop I used for the beta which was upgraded to final yesterday and has not yet failed. Discovered the problem. The system was prompting for my FileVault password but with the screen ...


8

If you hover over the disabled option, a tooltip appears explaining that the guest account can't be activated with FileVault turned on: This is because the new FileVault uses full-disk encryption that's decrypted by the login password of one of the users. As the guest account, by its nature, does not have a password, that would leave your computer ...


8

(I'm assuming you are referring to FileVault 2 found in OS X Lion) The folks at AnandTech have run some performance benchmarks on the new FileVault. Quote: ... [described are several I/O tests with and without FileVault enabled, including some charts you might want to have a look at] ... Overall the hit on pure I/O performance is in the 20 - 30% ...



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