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It is a file left behind by the OS X installer in later versions. It seems to always be there after installation, so its existence does not indicate a failure in it self. What the installer actually uses the file for is not known to me. It might be used if the installer fails/crashes, to indicate what the installer was doing at the time of the crash - but ...


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You can use the following command $ sudo find / -type f -size +1G In case you want to avoid traversing mounted drives, your command should be: $ sudo find -x / -type f -size +1G


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Say you are looking for big files in your home directory, use this command: find ~ -size +1G Replace ~ with the directory of interest. Update My original response was wrong, but I'll keep it to remind myself. If you are trying to get the size of a file, try this: stat -f '%z' filename # Normal file stat -L -f '%z' filename # symbolic link file I ...


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Holding the alt or option key while doing the Drag & Drop action works. I think since Chrome also handles webpages as links (html) to open them in the browser, it does the same for downloaded files. If you simply hold alt while clicking a link it also downloads the file. So I assume Chrome treats the downloaded "link" as a 'file' when holding that key. ...


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The files you attach are just copies of the originals. In order to edit the attached files, you must go to the original and edit it there. Once you update the Note, the changes will be reflected. According to Microsoft: OneNote 2016 for Mac can keep all of your information about any subject or project together in one place — including copies of ...


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To illuminate and expand on Eirik's answer a bit: The instructions he's provided you are essentially the same as you would use in the terminal, but with a few details hidden. My guess is that you're seeking to clean-up file names, so this is something the terminal is really, very good for: precisely, in fact, why it's retained in any modern operating ...


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With Finder as the active application, choose Find from the File menu. In the Searching "This Mac" window that brings up, select Kind is Document, then use + to add another condition with Name as the first item. If you choose begins with as the second item, you can find files whose names begin with a particular character, like space. The ends with condition ...



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