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You can use "touch -mt YYYYMMDDhhmm" followed by your file name/path, of course replacing YYYYMMDDhhmm with your desired date. I recommend typing "man touch" into terminal to look at the manual and different command options there.


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The meta data is stored in so called extended file attributes. The extended file attributes are stored in a named fork. So in essence forks are still very much used on OS X. However, the specific "resource fork" as managed by the Resource Manager API is deprecated, as you describe.


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No, file location isn't something that's tracked and without any form of backups, that would have path recursion, you're out of luck. At least you have the files and didn't loose them. You might want to consider using Time Machine going forward! Source: comment by user3439894


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It is a file left behind by the OS X installer in later versions. It seems to always be there after installation, so its existence does not indicate a failure in it self. What the installer actually uses the file for is not known to me. It might be used if the installer fails/crashes, to indicate what the installer was doing at the time of the crash - but ...



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