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If your drive is corrupted in any way you probably don't want to use it for backup purposes any more, unless the data is not of great value to you. Apple does not allow an easy transfer from drive to drive regarding backups. I think this is due to the way TimeMachine works (As stated in this apple discussion thread) Now how to do it anyways ? I would ...


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Copying the entire drive is a really bad idea for several reasons. Copying it to the cloud is also a bad idea. Buying a new TB or larger drive is far cheaper, faster, and easier and would let you just start backing up and put the "corrupt" backup on the shelf until you're sure you don't need to recover any files from it. Due to the hard links that are ...


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There are three ways to handle corrupted Time Machine backup drives: (easiest) Forget about the backup. It's a backup - you are not losing anything. Just erase it and start again. Copy the final backup (or just the parts that are really important) to other media. This can be done in the Finder, and it requires about the same space as what is currently on ...


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There is a GUI alternative to the CLI app lsof: fseventer is a great file system access monitoring utility for various purposes. It runs with super user permissions (sudo), so it sees all read/write access of all mounted file systems, and presents them in a very clear overview. My experience: I had a Volume which constantly could not be ejected properly (as ...


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That's the physical hard drive currently spinning away in your computer. What you regard as "Macintosh HD" is a software-created volume on that hard drive, containing OS X and all your files. You may have a Toshiba-made external hard drive, and something may be up with that, but as far as physical media is concerned, "500.11 GB TOSHIBA MK5065GSXF Media" and ...



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