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3

I'm assuming you have nothing on the new disk and essentially want to mirror what is on the old disk to the new disk. You can use the following command line, substituting the proper names for Source-Disk (old) and Destination-Disk (new). rsync -xavH /Volumes/Source-Disk/ /Volumes/Destination-Disk/ Note: The slash at the end of each path has significance, ...


2

exFAT is not optimal for your situation probably, but unfortunately there isn't really a no-brainer solution for using an external drive frequently with both OS X and Windows, reading/writing large files, and with really low risk of data loss. exFAT is not a journalled file system, so there is higher probability of data loss than with NTFS or HFS+. exFAT ...


2

Time Machine performs versioning backups at specific time intervals and keeps making backups until it runs out of space on the drive, then it starts to prune away older backups to make room for the new ones. The only way that I know of to control the amount of space that any one Time Machine Backup uses is to set up a partition on the drive in Disk ...


1

You could try to "mount" it via Terminal. First, make a mount point: sudo mkdir /Volumes/EXT_HD Now mount (your device numbers may be different, e.g. /dev/disk2s1 — you can determine what it is as it will the the highest number when you issue the command ‘ls /dev/disk*’): sudo mount -t msdos /dev/disk3s1 /Volumes/EXT_HD/ It might eventually show up in ...


1

This describes how to clone a drive using Disk Utility. In essence, you mount both drives on your system, select the new drive and choose restore, then select the old drive as the source and make a cup of coffee (500 GiB could take an hour or two, depending on you exact setup).


1

Most of the problems I seem to have with this kind of thing come from the ACL rather than the basic permissions. Usually what I end up doing to fix the problem is to format another drive to get the default permissions and ACLs then use these commands to copy them to my old drive: chown $(stat -f%u:%g "$srcdir") "$dstdir" # Copy owner and group chmod $(stat ...


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This one is already answered in the other discussion forum: Open SystemPreferences->StartupDisk and choose the SnowLeopard Disk, then restart. Lex


1

This is expected behavior. You specifically told it to not show up in your fstab file, with the "nobrowse" parameter. If you want it on the desktop to have a quick shortcut to it, create a symlink. ln -s /Volumes/VOLUME_NAME ~/Desktop/VOLUME_NAME


1

It might make sense to make the entire drive FAT32 to ensure readability between systems, unless there is a need for having multiple partitions not described in your question. As for the specific answers, Yes, dependent on #2 The files MUST be moved on a Mac because a PC cannot read an HFS+ partition by default and even then, cannot read without special ...


1

Terminal (Hackers way) Open the Terminal.app (Hidden in Applications -> Utilities -> Terminal) and Navigate with cd to your Folder where the zip file is stored. Example: cd cd ~/Desktop/ And extract the ZIP file with the OSX command line tool unzip unzip /path/to/the/archive.zip -d /Volumes/USB_Drive/ the -d switch let you set the extraction ...



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