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1

As a proof of concept, I formatted a USB Thumb-drive using a GUID Partition Map and formatted it Mac OS Extended (Journaled) naming it "Encrypted". Then in Finder, I selected the disk named "Encrypted" and control-clicked selecting Encrypt "Encrypted"..., while setting its password to "password". When it was done encrypting, using Terminal, I ascertained ...


2

i like to do it this way. while true; do diskutil cs list | grep 'Conversion Progress' ; sleep 30; done will print out an updated progress every 30 seconds so you can just leave it running and glance over and instantly see where the progress is up to without having to run the command again.


-1

Look in Utilities/Keychain to see if the backup password is there


0

You should be able to reliably lock the disk (in fact these are two disks: one physical and one logical) by first ejecting the unlocked, encrypted volume and then ejecting the base disk containing the Logical Volume Group: Usually a mounted and unlocked diskutil listing looks like this: /dev/disk0 (internal, physical): #: TYPE NAME ...


0

This is a flaw in the CoreStorage encryption system. When you first connect the physical disk, the volume is in state Locked. Once you enter the password, the volume becomes Unlocked. (you can actually see the state of your volume from diskutil list) The problem is that CoreStorage does not lock a volume until it is physically removed from the system. My ...


1

Ransomware works by selecting certain files (normally by type - like docs, bitcoin wallets, etc), encrypting those individual files and forcing you to pay up for a key to decrypt them. FileVault protects your data on your Mac by encrypting the whole disk. When you boot up your Mac, you put in a password that effectively "decrypts" the drive and allows it to ...


2

I personally use encFS, which is pretty easy to install on MacOSX, given that you know how to use homebrew and casks: brew cask install osxfuse brew install homebrew/fuse/encfs To use it, I theen use two aliases, one to mount the volume: mypasswd='encfs ~/cloud/Documents.encfs ~/Private -- && cd ~/Private' and then to unmount (and close the ...


5

It depends on your viewpoint: a file written to an encrypted disk image is immediately written encrypted to the HDD/SSD where the disk image resides. Since the file system of the unlocked disk image is still mounted, the file appears as "unencrypted". So a user, who can access the raw HDD/SSD only, can't read/decode the file content, but a user with the ...


-2

No, not directly (in the sense that the file is protected) the file that you add to an encrypted disk image will not be encrypted, or locked, until you unmount / eject your disk image. When your disk image is unmounted the entire disk image will re-encrypt itself and by side effect protect the file you added.


0

Can you go into your files and see what the general date of "Modification" for disk util, bluetooth, bootcamp, etc. All the SIP protected applications should all be roughly one date. I ask because if you didn't get updated properly, disk util got left behind and you need the combo updater I believe. 10.11.3 if you didn't want to update: 10.11.3 Combo ...


0

Just as an extra note to the existing answers, I ran this through grep to get a concise answer to each conversion. diskutil cs list | grep -e "Conversion" -e "Volume Name" The result was: | Conversion Status: Converting (forward) | Conversion Progress: 71% | Volume Name: Macintosh HD Conversion Status: ...


5

It appears this is what I was looking for: https://gpgtools.org/


5

If you want operating system independence, e.g., a thumb drive that you can use on systems other than OSX, you might want to look at VeraCrypt - the successor to TrueCrypt. VeraCrypt is open source as well. Further information can be found in this answer.


9

Just use FileVault 2, which comes with El Capitan and is pretty secure. If you need separate volumes or passwords for different projects, you can also use OS X encrypted disk images with 128 or 256 bit AES encryption. This allows you to choose to store the passphrase for each volume offline, in separate keychains or in the main keychain as you see fit. The ...


17

The best thing you can do is creating a new admin user and inspecting the assaulted main user/the system. Boot to Recovery Mode (hold cmdR while booting). Unlock and mount the main encrypted volume either with Disk Utility or Terminal: #list all CoreStorage items diskutil cs list #unlock the locked Logical Volume (replace lvUUID by the UUID found above. ...


0

If you can get into the guest user, the problem does not lie within the system, so reinstalling it will not fix the problem. Free movie sites (and other free sites) can sometimes trigger a virus or a bug that damages a Mac’s user files. You would be better off if you started on an external hard disk, and then used Disk Utility (In Applications/Utilities) ...



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