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I'm a little unclear what your configuration is... If your "128GB SD" is an external drive: Unencrypt the data, reformat macbook, encrypt data again. If your "128GB SD" is the drive that you wish to reformat: Copy the data to another external drive unencrypted, reformat your drive, copy the data back onto it and encrypt it over again. Is there anything ...


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Yes, once removed, the data can only feasibly be accessed by someone with your password. However, if the attacker gets your computer while it is still running, then uses a USB attack to either force a login as you or creating a new admin (root) account, without the system turning off or rebooting, then your data is at risk. It's possible, but currently ...


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Yes. FileVault 2 uses 128 bit AES encryption on all the data on your disk. This is why when you turn on FileVault, you will experience a background task grinding through your entire volume, encrypting the data as it goes. Once complete, only someone with your passphrase will be able to decrypt the data, even if they remove the drive from your Mac.


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You must have enabled FileVault, therefore your disk this encrypted, you go to: System preferences / security and privacy / FileVault. if enabled it so you disable, it should take some time why he will decrypt your disk, then restart and everything returns to normal. for more information: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204156


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The only way to keep your Mac safe while you are away is to power it down. Period. Even then, leaving your Mac unattended may not be a good idea, but at least your data is safe, just in case the Mac got stolen. FV2 does a great job protecting your data, but unless your Mac is powered down, there are potential ways for an attacker to compromise it and get ...


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It's possible to encrypt the entire system volume with FileVault 2 -- open System Preferences -> Security & Privacy pane -> FileVault tab, and click Turn On FileVault. I'll walk you through some setup questions (most important: set up an emergency recovery option, either by linking to your iCloud account or by generating a random key you should write ...


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This is a tough one to answer. I have seen discussions on MacInTouch.com about just this subject. And if you keep up with news online about such tings you will find that opinions vary from "Chicken Little" to, "nah, don't worry about it on a Mac." The truth likely lives somewhere between the two. Generally viruses of all types have a bit of a harder time ...


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If you want set-it-forget-it like BackBlaze, then iCloud is not for you. Your data is safe from a rogue Apple employee, but not safe from a government agency or someone with a legal ability to extract it. When Apple can help you regain access to your iCloud files if you forget your password then they can help a government agency to do that too. But if you ...



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