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16

Open up the Terminal and enter the command: diskutil cs list You will see an output listing at least one Logical Volume Group, with a Logical Volume Family and Logical Volume nested below. There is be a Conversion Status item in the Volume Family entry that will tell you if it's converting to an encrypted volume or not, and for a progress indicator, look ...


15

You can do it with a .dmg. Open Disk utility Select New Image or File > New > Blank disk image Choose the name, where to put it, the size (it will be pre-allocated) Choose an encryption Leave the other settings by default Choose a password Now, all you have to do when you want to access that folder, is open the .dmg file. And it's free. I found an app ...


11

John Siracusa's detailed Lion review covers the new FileVault disk encryption feature in great detail: http://arstechnica.com/apple/reviews/2011/07/mac-os-x-10-7.ars/13#lion-file-system To summarise, the new system is "volume" based. This means that not all volumes can be or are encrypted. The Lion recovery partition for example is not encrypted. Non Mac ...


9

Yes. FileVault2 is volume based so you can have an encrypted Mac OS volume and an unencrypted Windows bootcamp partition for instance. The Recovery partition is also not encrypted. FileVault2 requires Lion to decrypt/decode the drive. It doesn't work with Windows Linux, or previous versions of Mac OS X. I recommend John Siracusa's Lion review for more ...


9

This is exactly what a dmg does. To create one use Disk Utility and hit the New Image icon. Then choose the size, encryption and choose the image format as one of the sparse images. Even if you choose a large size it will only take up space according to what you save in it.


9

Your question contains the most important thing needed to secure a computer against a motivated attack to compromise a FileVault 2 protected Mac volume. Don't connect FireWire to a device you don't or can't trust while you are logged in to an account that has file vault keys active. Pick good single use passwords to reduce the chance of other compromises ...


9

I use 1Password. I a bit pricey but worth it. There are iOS and Mac OS versions. You have to purchase both. Where 1Password really shines is for website logins. There's a demo for the Mac on their site.


9

No, the backups will not be encrypted automatically, but it's very easy to enable for directly attached disks. Just check "Encrypt Backup Disk" in the Time Machine disk selection settings. If you're backing up to another Mac, you can use Disk Utility on that Mac to erase non-boot drives and put an encrypted partition on them:


9

OS X 10.7.4 Core Storage for encryption, ZEVO for ZFS Example Objective: one physical disk, five volumes. One of five non-encrypted, one encrypted with a passphrase, three encrypted with a different passphrase. Starting point: /dev/disk2 – a physical disk /dev/disk2s2 – a JHFS+ volume to be kept, unprotected /dev/disk2s3 – a slice to be destroyed, to ...


8

It's not possible (at least not that I know) to specify Filevault's target dir. It will work by automatically working with your home folder by creating (if you are in Leopard or above) a Sparse Bundle (or a Sparse Disk Image if you are in Tiger). The reason for the change has to do with Time Machine (and to allow -to a certain extent- to backup a FileVaulted ...


8

Yes, you can do this using the built-in Disk Images of Mac OS X. A disk image (or DMG file) is a file which, when opened, presents itself as a removable Mac OS X volume, similar to a removable hard drive. Many OS X applications are deployed on disk images. If you encrypt your home directory using FileVault, you're creating a spare bundle disk image. You can ...


8

No. Apple securely transmits and stores the data to the cloud by using secure tokens for authentication - as officially stated in the iCloud security and privacy overview1 and the iCloud design guide2. Apple also states they they will "never provide encryption keys to any third parties", which of course is not entirely true due to the Patriot Act3. ...


8

To answer your first question about the keychain and whether you should encrypt backups: the passwords in your keychain are already encrypted, that's why you always have to type a password (by default your login password) to show stored passwords. So there's no immediate need to encrypt. Of course, you could add Time Machine encryption to provide a further ...


8

PGP is a fantastic standard and has many uses and great implementations, but if you want to sign and encrypt email with a minimum of fuss, I think you'll find as I have that S/MIME is more well-supported. Many mail clients (including the stock Mail app on iOS and Mail.app on OS X, and other popular clients such as Microsoft Outlook) can handle S/MIME out of ...


8

You can also use gpgtools (https://gpgtools.org) it is got all the possible GPG tools you are probably going to need (they also have a gpg plugin for Apple Mail) and adds Services for signing/encrypting/decrypting/etc. to the contextual menu (right-click->Services).


8

I had a similar problem today. I installed osxfuse and ntfs-3g via Homebrew, but I didn't install the kernel extension. I got a similar error message trying to mount an NTFS drive in RW mode. After installing the osxfuse kernel extension (instructions are available via brew info osxfuse), the error went away. Strangely, it didn't happen the first time I ...


7

Time Machine does have a checkbox to encrypt the backup, but it will read, encrypt, and write every block of the disk - which can take a long time. If you are using a new drive it is much faster to encrypt it with Disk Utility first. The encryption is handled by the OS – not Time Machine. Lion will prompt for the password whenever the disk is attached. Once ...


7

After a bit of messing about, it turns out that there is a better compromise which doesn't seem to be clearly documented anywhere obvious, so I thought I'd share it here. I don't believe this is a duplicate but I'm happy to see this question closed if I've missed something. The cost of the solution (which may be unacceptable to some) is that you need to ...


6

Mac OS X comes with FileVault for encrypting your home directory. There isn't a whole lot of customization for it, but it does its job. There are a few downsides, though: FileVault does not play well with Time Machine backups. Time Machine can only back up the FileVault encrypted disk image when the user is logged out. As FileVault runs it tends to slowly ...


6

Other than making sure you have power available when you turn on or off the entire disk's worth of IO to encrypt/decrypt, performance and power deltas are barely measurable. Less than 1-2% is what I'm seeing. Other than hammering large IO benchmarks, in practice it doesn't matter one bit whether FileVault 2 is on or off for the initial build of Lion. As ...


6

You can use hdiutil to mount a disk image that is protected with a passphrase. hdiutil attach -agentpass /path/to/image.dmg That should attempt to mount the disk image, prompting you for the passphrase. If it's encrypted with a public key, you can pass that using option -pubkey.


6

No, Windows does not support FileVault (so it would not boot if it was encrypted thus!) The Windows option would be BitLocker. (perhaps it is more correct to say FileVault does not support anything but Mac OS Extended (Journaled) partitions) If you need a great, free, cross-platform, open-source, strong encryption tool check out TrueCrypt. Can you use ...


6

Just found the answer here. Basically, from the terminal, type: sudo diskutil cs list You'll get a list of your drives and a bunch of related info. Look for the one you want to format and grab its Logical Volume Group's UUID. It should look something like this: Logical Volume Group XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX Then erase the drive by executing ...


6

Try iPGMail. More here. Features (copied from iTunes app store): PGMail is an app that implements the OpenPGP standard (RFC 4880) and allows the user to create and manage both public and private (RSA and DSA) PGP keys and send and receive PGP encrypted messages. PGP Keys and Messages can be passed to iPGMail several ways: From the iOS ...


6

The software you are looking for is called "Digital Rights Management" software, often abbreviated to "DRM". Searching for this term will find a wide range of third party tools and solutions for protecting your videos. The offerings will range from massive companies like Adobe with their Access solution to numerous smaller companies. Protecting ...


5

When I need partial encryption and especially when the encrypted container needs to be portable, I turn my head to TrueCrypt, which is free & open source software, available for the major operating systems, and can create encrypted containers create encrypted virtual disk images encrypt entire disks create hidden & encrypted volumes (by ...


5

Check out Keka - the free Max OS X file archiver With 7z and Zip you will have the opportunity to create password encrypted files to better protect your privacy. It's as easy as write your password in the box, and drag and drop files to Keka in the dock. Another way is to run the command in your Terminal.app: $ zip -e myzip.zip ...


5

To delete the backups, go to iTunes>Preferences>Devices. All iPhone backups will be listed here. Highlight them, then hit Delete. But if you're using a Mac, I would first try to see if you can find the password in your Keychain (from discussions.apple.com): Go to the "keychain access " app. Under "Keychains" select "Login" Under "Category" ...


5

According to a public talk by Rich Trouton, FileVault 2 is not FIPS 140-2 validated, but "Apple's new Common Crypto implementation is just starting to undergo FIPS evaluation" The code itself for Common Crypto is available at http://www.opensource.apple.com/ and has been all the way back to 10.4 (where I got tired of checking revisions - it probably goes ...


5

No. Time Machine backups are not encrypted by default. You have to opt-in. The configuration is easy if the backup drive is connected via USB/Firewire. If the backup drive is connected by Ethernet/Wi-Fi, the process of setting up Time Machine is more complicated. Connected via USB/Firewire Select the option in System Preferences → Time Machine ...



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