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15

You can recreate the EFI System Partition (ESP) using the command-line gpt tool. It should start at sector 40, and it should be 409600 sectors (exactly 200MiB) long. The GPT entry's type should be C12A7328-F81F-11D2-BA4B-00A0C93EC93B, and if you have a hybrid MBR, the type there should be EE. The format is actually a subset of FAT, not HFS+. You can read the ...


7

Yes, you can install a shell. You can also setup a firmware password, though you generally use utilities that run under Mac OS X to set it up (Apple include's Firmware Password Utility on the install DVD, but does not actually lay it down on the system partition). EFI is probably less interesting from an hobbyist perspective than OpenFirmware was. Even if ...


5

First install rEFInd, and boot Ubuntu installer after. Enable "Boot after power failure" by adding next line to /etc/rc.local: `setpci -s 0:1f.0 0xa4.b=0` Install mac fan control: sudo add-apt-repository ppa:mactel-support/ppa sudo apt-get update sudo apt-get install -y macfanctld applesmc-dkms For SSD tunning (you have to adapt to your config) here ...


4

I finally managed to successfully downgrade the EFI firmware to version 1.6. Unfortunately that didn't make my hard drive work. However I'm going to reproduce my steps here so that the whole world can know what it takes: Download the EFI firmware update package from Apple. Here is the link I used for firmware version 1.6 for my Macbook Pro: ...


3

EFI is a contract that specifies how the hardware can find and start the software and vice versa. Rather than have to build custom code into each new hardware device and each new software release - a standard was agreed upon and the specification was initially written by Intel. Then a company like Apple decides to adopt a certain version of the EFI ...


3

You could try installing rEFIt, which will give you a boot menu every time you boot up. http://refit.sourceforge.net


3

Yup, apparently it is missing and you have to install EDK to get it.


3

So you can image the drive and get things set up while your new drive is in an enclosure and only swap it into your Mac as an internal drive once it is tested and ready to go. Also, not having to code special exceptions when to and when not to write an EFI partition is sound engineering practice. You can't write buggy code if you don't write any code.


2

Removed vertex2 SSD - Mac booted. Looks like the SSD has failed, because if I install the SSD to other SATA slot, the MacBook does not boot, either. Also, this drive is invisible with external SATA to USB adapter. It's Good to have a backup solution.


2

The default results of diskutil list on a clean Lion installation should be as follows: mac:~ me$ diskutil list /dev/disk0 #: TYPE NAME SIZE IDENTIFIER 0: GUID_partition_scheme *500.1 GB disk0 1: EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: ...


2

Delete the EFI partition, do your secure erase, then don't partition or format the drive from Windows 7. Instead, boot from the OSX installer disk or recovery environment, and use its version of Disk Utility to partition the drive, using the GUID partition scheme. Disk Utility will create the EFI partition for you if done this way. To be clear: the EFI ...


2

If you are still looking for an answer I found one on Stack Overflow: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/777437/sopen-s-firmware-console-on-mac-osx-intel It does not seem possible to do this. The only thing you can install to get some kind of EFI boot menu options menu is rEFIt, which can be found here: http://refit.sourceforge.net I know it isn't ...


2

EFI firmware updates are 'staged' in the normally hidden EFI partition on your disk, which typically resides at device /dev/disk0s1. Once in single-user mode, you can create a folder in which to mount this partition, then mount it like so: mkdir /Volumes/efi mount -t msdos /dev/disk0s1 /Volumes/efi From here, navigate into the /EFI/APPLE/FIRMWARE/ ...


2

Expanding on sschuberth's answer, as of December 2013, the Samsung 840 EVO (but not PRO) also has firmware that directly supports TCG OPAL. It's a good bet that an 840 Pro firmware update to do the same thing will come soon. You need some software to manage the SED drive, otherwise you get little or no benefit from the built-in security. WinMagic ...


2

I found a post on the subject from the guy who wrote this book about Mac OS X internals. His post mentions Snow Leopard (10.6), but the issues would be similar for 10.7. See Mac OS X Internals - Is Your Machine Good Enough for Snow Leopard K64? Here's the part I found most relevant to your question: [...] Unfortunately, a 64-bit processor alone doesn’t ...


2

I can confirm that if Win8 is installed from an ISO (rather than a Win7 upgrade) then it will be installed on a boot-using-EFI partition.


2

It seems that some early 2011 15" Macbook Pro (8,2) machines have trouble creating a Fusion Drive. It's being discussed in this MacRumors forum thread: http://forums.macrumors.com/showthread.php?t=1480179&page=16. This is the post that gives more datailed information about the problem ...


2

If you can successfully start your Mac from a Mac OS X DVD take a look at this: http://pubmem.wordpress.com/2011/04/09/flash-efi-firmware-update-manually-on-a-macbook-51/, especially comment 54 and follow-ups. It explains how to manually flash the EFI firmware: Download the EFI Firmware update from Apple. This link lists EFI and SMC firmware updates. You ...


2

They are hidden partitions in OS X. Showing all partitions in Disk Utility also shows the partitions in the list: …and diskutil list: 1: EFI EFI 209.7 MB disk0s1 2: Apple_HFS Mac SSD 150.0 GB disk0s2 3: Apple_Boot Recovery HD 650.0 MB disk0s3 They are usually not mounted by default and therefore not shown on the desktop ...


2

The ESP is normally used for the boot loader on ‘normal’ EFI systems, however on a Mac the ESP is not—it is usually empty, but has been used as a staging area for firmware updates. A Mac will initially look in the ESP for anything to boot from, but if it is empty or non-existant, it will look for the root file system to boot from.


1

I can verify that this procedure does indeed reset SMC. It will give a warning-message, but this is unrelated. Fans, charging and everything else goes back to normal, as with a keyboard-triggered SMC-reset.


1

I have had a similar issue when using a newer version of OS X than the system originally came with. Booting into an external system of the original operating system (in your case, 10.6 Snow Leopard) allowed the firmware to install and stop asking.


1

If you have a spare linux box you can try to use SystemRescueCD to mount and possibly recover the data on your Mac (hfs+) partitions. SystemRescueCD The SystemRescueCD contains TestDisk which I have used to recover data from Linux, Windows as well as Mac file systems: TestDisk I think there is also a TestDisk Mac app you can install and run from a ...


1

According to Apple you should use following EFI versions. MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2011) MacBookPro8,1 MBP81.0047.B27 (EFI 2.7) 1.68f99 (SMC 1.6) MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2011) MacBookPro8,2 MBP81.0047.B27 (EFI 2.7) 1.69f4 (SMC 1.7)


1

If it happens you mess it up, you can download it from Apple. EFI and SMC firmware updates for Intel-based Macs This article lists firmware updates that were released for Intel-based Macs. They update the firmware that originally shipped from the factory. If your computer isn't on this list, then you don't need an update to the factory firmware.


1

Ubuntu has instructions for most macbook pro's. Depending on which version of the macbook pro you have you may not need rEFInd: https://help.ubuntu.com/community/MacBookPro


1

If your EFI is not working, you will need to restore it. Download from here for your model. Then follow the procedure described here.


1

Your computer is currently set to mount and show hidden partitions, which is unusual. To get control of this feature, you need to activate the Debug menu in Disk Utility which then gives you the option of viewing and mounting hidden partitions, or indeed, making them hidden again. Try reading this article which gives instructions: ...


1

To re-enable an EFI password: Boot into Recovery holding Command+R at the startup chime From the menu bar, select Utilities > Firmware Password Utility Enter a Firmware password and quit the Utility pane. Note that you’ll only be prompted for this EFI password if you attempt to boot the machine differently than you would normally. Otherwise, you’ll boot ...


1

Set your Disk utility in to Debug mode. Now you should be able to "see" the hidden partitions like EFI and the Recovery HD. To enable the Debug mode use your Terminal: Enter the following command at the Terminal prompt: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1 Needless to say, there is a reason for those partitions to be hidden, so do ...



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