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10

I had the same problem, and I think I found what causes the problem. My macbook air was detecting the display, but only thing I saw was black screen. Either your monitor is using VGA signal even if you are using DVI cable or you are using DVI to VGA adapter in between. MiniDP to DVI only produces digital signal. For more information check a blog post of ...


8

The Apple press release says "supports DisplayPort for high resolution displays and works with existing adapters for HDMI, DVI and VGA displays", but this is referring to the Thunderbolt output port (for daisy-chaining). The Thunderbolt Display will not work with a non-Thunderbolt machine without an adapter. But unfortunately now that the they have started ...


5

Yes, that will work just fine. Notice that the female DVI connector has more slots than the male connector has pins. Those slots are for the extra pins needed by a dual link cable. They're not needed for a single link DVI connection, so they'll just sit unused.


5

No, such an adapter does not exist and is unnecessary. Since Thunderbolt is backwards compatible with Mini Display port. If you look at accessory options for the MacBook Pro, you will see only the following display output adapters available: Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter Apple Mini ...


5

No. DVI-D only carries digital signals. Most (if not all) DVI -> VGA converters use the analog signal DVI-I carries. A mini DisplayPort to DVI connector will only pass on digital signals (as you correctly identified by referring to it as a DVI-D signal), so your DVI to VGA adapter is left out in the cold. You need to get a mini DisplayPort to VGA adapter. ...


5

Additionally, don't forget that Thunderbolt really means mini DisplayPort where video adapters are being considered. Since a DVI connection is required for your external display get something that will end in a DVI connection. Additionally don't forget to shop around for adapters, places like MonoPrice can help you save a bundle on adapters and Cables when ...


4

Yes, that should definitely be possible, as both Thunderbolt ports are also mini DisplayPort ports and the other would be connected via HDMI. See also this answer: http://apple.stackexchange.com/a/54306/14994


4

There are many types of DVI adapter, I could type a load of stuff or just point you at Wikipedia. The key point is that there is no such thing as a DVI adapter. It's just a generic term that covers the overall outline of the cable end, but what you really have is either a DVI-I or DVI-D adapter, in either Single or Dual link capability. Or it may be a ...


4

The Apple 15" MacBook Pro specification about Graphics and Video Support says: Dual display and video mirroring: Simultaneously supports full native resolution on the built-in display and up to 2560 by 1600 pixels on up to two external displays, at millions of colors Thunderbolt digital video output Native Mini DisplayPort output DVI output ...


4

DVI (DVI = Digital Visual Interface) does never carry sound, it's visual only. Buying a Mini Displayport to HDMI does not help you out either because it's not supported for your Macbook Air. Here's the list of laptop models that support audio pass-through via MDP MacBook Air 11" Model 3,1 MacBook Air 11" Model 4,1 MacBook Air 11" Model 5,1 MacBook Air 13" ...


3

I'm seeing on Apples site that the system requirements are as follows: Thunderbolt-enabled Mac computer, including MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac OS X v10.6.8 or later That means it must be Thunderbolt enabled.


3

Yes. In addition to the HDMI port, you can use either of the Thunderbolt ports as mini DisplayPort ports, just like all Thunderbolt ports.


3

No HDMI and DVI are both digital signals there will be no degradation in quality between the two. If in fact they are compatible with each other as referenced on Wikipedia. HDMI is backward-compatible with single-link Digital Visual Interface digital video (DVI-D or DVI-I, but not DVI-A). No signal conversion is required when an adapter or asymmetric ...


3

It should be noted that an adapter isn't even necessary, they generally add bulk because it's a device needed in addition to the cable. You should consider an HDMI to DVI cable (very common, simple, cheap) which just has those 2 connectors, and doesn't require extra bulk in the form of an adapter(hdmi's video is hardware compatable with dvi, the connector is ...


3

Absolutely! At work we have multiple Mac Pro's that have 1 monitor between them hot-swapped and while there's up to 5 seconds of delay for the video to come through, it works great. You can hot-swap displays, but not video cards - if that makes sense.


3

It should be fine. Apple themselves offer to sell you a 27" display along with the laptop so it clearly is capable of driving that many pixels. I myself use a 15" 2012 MBP Retina with one of those mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI adapters (hooked up to a Hazro 27" monitor, so cheap no-frills much like you're considering) and its been pretty good. This is ...


2

You either have a bad adapter, cable, or TV. The S-Video standard separates the luma (dark to light) signal from the color signal. If only the luma signal is getting through, it will result in the picture being black and white. I suggest trying a different cable, and, if you have one available, a separate S-Video device. If both those work properly, your ...


2

Same problem here with a Specter x20G Naga III monitor. A few days ago I tried to set up a new Mac mini for my wife. There was no video from the HDMI to DVI converter. I plugged the old Mac mini (circa 2007 but updated to Snow Leopard) in and the video worked just fine. I called Apple Care, they made an appointment with me at the Genius Bar, I took the new ...


2

The Dual Link DVI connector is an active adapter, and requires a power source (which Mini-DP cannot supply). It uses the USB as a source of power to power the adapter.


2

I've had the problem as well and only by resetting my monitor am I able to get it to work. Other posts suggesting it is something to do with the PRAM, but I've not seen the problem being on the Mac end of things. As this problem is persistent, so it seems I will have to reset the monitor each time so it recovers from the failure, but doesn't seem to address ...


2

This most likely means the Mac is outputting a video mode that the screen can't display. Try reducing the resolution and Refresh Rate (in System Preferences -> Display) until you get something on the screen, then work your way up the list again. A good starting point would be 1024x768 or even 640x480. The other possibility would be that the signal isn't ...


2

This is from my own experience, I have macbook pro with lion and a dell monitor, I connect via mini displayport to VGA connector, if I connect displayport first to my macbook and then monitor's vga to displayport to VGA, it won't work, I don't know why but maybe some internal implementation detail, just go in this order switch on both devices connect ...


2

The problem with the high resolution is that the monitor uses a dual-link DVI-cable as it is needed to provide such a high resolution. The Dual-link cable is not a normal DVI-cable and therefore will not work as expected with a normal adapter. The adapter you have linked should suffice thou. But beware that the ad says no adapters and no Macbook, this could ...


2

DVI does not pass through sound, just video. You will need to use a separate cable for the sound.


2

After more playing around, I now have a workaround whereby using a Mini DisplayPort to VGA adapter instead of one of the Mini DisplayPort to DVI adapters, i.e. an analogue connection to one of the displays instead of digital, seems to work and allows me to have 3 active displays configured like so: Display 1 connected via HDMI to DVI adapter (into HDMI ...


2

I have a late 2011 15 inch MBP and have successfully used Thunderbolt adaptors to connect to monitors via DVI and TV via HDMI with excellent results. You don't need a 16:10 screen - the display will adapt to various screen dimensions. I think you can plug just about anything in with a very high chance of success.


2

I have this same issue on my iMac 27" (Mid 2011) with one external DVI monitor. I took the iMac into the Apple store and the genius couldn't provide an answer to why this was occurring. I also tried using both Thunderbolt ports and the issue would happen on both. So for now what I did was to not let my iMac go into sleep mode. I set it to just have the ...


2

No there is not a DVI, Displayport, or even a VGA to Thunderbolt adapter available yet. It looks like if such a device were to be made it would have to have a DisplayPort input, to work, or include active convertors for other legacy signals because DisplayPort is the integrated video signal with Thunderbolt. To do this a DisplayPort to Thunderbolt ...


2

It seems you may connect thunderbolt peripherals to display port devices. 2011 MacBook Pro and after to LED Cinema Display. But not the contrary. pre 2011 MacBook Pro to Thunderbolt display. http://reviews.cnet.com/8301-13727_7-20043524-263.html


1

Shut down the MacBook. Start it up with the external monitor connected. It should recognise it. Had same problem on Mountain Lion with a projector I had used many times before. Was supposed to be showing a film to a bunch of kids in the Youth Club and had to give up. My wife discovered the next day that restarting with it connected fixed it.



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