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14

As has been mentioned, you couldn't daisy-chain multiple Thunderbolt displays on pre-2012 Airs. Two possible add-ons that'll allow you to connect an additional external display: Matrox DualHead2Go (in action hooked up to an 11" Air) DisplayLink adapter I've used the latter and they work pretty well for non-intensive applications.


10

Your Air supports the internal display as well as only one ThunderBolt external display. As commented below, the Mid 2012 Air can run two ThunderBolt displays. Physically you can daisy chain as many Thunderbolt Displays as you have money, but the first limitation you will run into is the graphics card. The official Apple knowledge base article lists the ...


8

According to this source, this should work. This other source confirms it. These are the troubleshooting steps I would try: Run all software updates on both the iMac and MacBook Air. A lot of times there are firmware updates that address issues like this. Open System Preferences > Displays and click Detect Displays. Reset the PRAM on both the iMac and the ...


8

The Apple press release says "supports DisplayPort for high resolution displays and works with existing adapters for HDMI, DVI and VGA displays", but this is referring to the Thunderbolt output port (for daisy-chaining). The Thunderbolt Display will not work with a non-Thunderbolt machine without an adapter. But unfortunately now that the they have started ...


7

Yes. It usually "just works," but if you're having trouble, Apple has detailed instructions: Apple Portables: How to use your computer in closed clamshell (display closed) mode with an external display


7

As @bmike, @djacobson, and @jaberg have stated in comments, that will not work. There is currently (as of March 2012) no adapter, nor do I expect there to be one to adapt mini-DisplayPort to Thunderbolt. (The standards were defined to be backward-compatible, not forward-compatible.)


7

Is it possible to use my Macbook Pro's display to receive inputs from other sources? No.


6

Yes - you might be overlooking that all the Display Port adapters work perfectly well with Thunderbolt macs. Just place it at the end of the chain. It's not an issue since your VGA or HDMI device isn't going to have another Thunderbolt port in the chain to send the data further. You are necessarily connecting at the end of the line. The Moshi is my ...


6

There should be an "Underscan" adjustment in display preferences. Open up the Displays in System Preferences. Have a look at your available resolutions. There should be a 720p, 1080i and 1080p, choose whichever is appropriate for your TV, and a slider labelled Underscan should appear. Adjust as necessary to get the picture right on your TV.


6

Another option to to use a display multiplexer, like the Matrox DualHead2Go DP. This will have much better performance (frame rate / snappiness) than the USB solution, at about 4X the price. It's best with matched dual external displays - or triple; there's also a 3-monitor solution. I haven't used one personally, but have recommended it to clients with ...


5

No, such an adapter does not exist and is unnecessary. Since Thunderbolt is backwards compatible with Mini Display port. If you look at accessory options for the MacBook Pro, you will see only the following display output adapters available: Apple Mini DisplayPort to DVI Adapter Apple Mini DisplayPort to Dual-Link DVI Adapter Apple Mini ...


5

First generation MacBook Airs could only drive a single display. And the current generation, Thunderbolt-equipped, MacBook Airs do not support more than one external display via the Thunderbolt port. The graphics chip used in these Macs isn't up to the task of driving extremely high resolution display combinations. Reference: Unfortunately, this ability ...


5

I am not aware of any manual that contains this information but here is a breakdown, since this is one of the big reasons I got a MacBook originally. The mini display port allows you to add an additional monitor to your MacBook. Support for this is built into the OS directly so you simply connect your external monitor using the correct MD/VGA or MD/HDMI or ...


5

Yes, but it's not worth it. You would have to take the laptop apart, design and engineer a custom converter to drive the LCD interface (internally, it's going to use LVDS to handle the interface between the laptop's motherboard and the screen), and power it somehow. It also would probably render the macbook from which you removed the screen unusable as a ...


5

If your other input sources are networked computers that are on the same network as your MacBook? You could use a VNC like program such as ScreenRecycler to let other computers show their screen on your Macbook.


5

No. DVI-D only carries digital signals. Most (if not all) DVI -> VGA converters use the analog signal DVI-I carries. A mini DisplayPort to DVI connector will only pass on digital signals (as you correctly identified by referring to it as a DVI-D signal), so your DVI to VGA adapter is left out in the cold. You need to get a mini DisplayPort to VGA adapter. ...


5

Here's one example of someone running two 27" displays at 2560x1440 via Thunderbolt/DisplayPort plus an HDMI display at 1920x1200: http://blog.macsales.com/14241-macbook-pro-15-with-retina-display-can-run-3-external-displays The Thunderbolt ports officially support up to 2560x1600 so that resolution shouldn't be any problem either: Simultaneously ...


4

No, it does not, I fear: the DisplayPort is an output only.


4

Finally I found this. Looks like the default EDID configuration for Dell displays is not quite right. On that post there's also a ruby script that suposedly generates the right file for your display, but it ended up screwing even more my resolution. I downloaded the file from the first post, and after copying it to /System/Library/Displays/Overrides and ...


4

I've just managed to workaround the problem by disabling DisplayPort 1.2 within the Dell OSD. To do this, you might need to use a bit of a workaround, which is to get the monitor to bring up the input select and then hold down the green tick for ~8 seconds when the (mini-)DisplayPort option is selected. This will bring up a new menu that enables you to ...


4

No this will not work. Check the system requirements for the Apple Thunderbolt display. System Requirements Thunderbolt-enabled Mac computer, including MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac OS X v10.6.8 or later As of yet there is no way to add a Thunderbolt port to a Mac that did not ship with Thunderbolt.


4

Thunderbolt is a superset of Displayport Apple page on Thunderbolt says And because Thunderbolt is based on DisplayPort technology, the video standard for high-resolution displays, any Mini DisplayPort display plugs right into the Thunderbolt port. To connect a DisplayPort, DVI, HDMI, or VGA display, just use an existing adapter.


4

Simply plug in one DisplayPort/Thunderbolt display or video adapter per port. That gets you two screens in addition to the iMac screen. There is a little confusion over multiple displays on one thunderbolt chain and real experience is limited since no thunderbolt monitors are shipping widely as of mid-August 2011. If you care about the details or ...


4

The spec page for the display implies very strongly that Thunderbolt displays will only work with Thunderbolt Macs. This happens to concern me since I own a previous-generation iMac (pre-Thunderbolt) and really wanted to have the option to use it with a Thunderbolt display. So I asked the guys at the Apple Store. The Apple Store told me no, it will not ...


4

As has been said in the other answer, you are restricted to a single external display with the built-in hardware. You can however add extra external displays using USB based display adapters. For example I use one of the DisplayLink adapters. Some of the DisplayLink adapters can do 2048x1152. There will be a limit to how many USB adapters make sense, before ...


4

The following options will work for you: old iMac as a display for MBP, MBA and new iMac. Use a mDP cable. new iMac as a display for MBA. Use a TB cable.


4

Thunderbolt is different than other connectors in that there are two 10 Gbps signals multiplexed on one physical connector/cable assembly. The DisplayPort signal will go down the chain of devices uninterrupted so the full DP bandwidth will get to the monitor that will ultimately end up at the end of the device chain. Of course new display hardware could be ...


3

New MacBook Pros don't have mini DVI; they have mini DisplayPort. You'll need a mini DisplayPort to HDMI adaptor (third party; Apple don't make one), and it will need to also have an audio connector since mini DisplayPort doesn't include an audio signal.


3

Yes you can, you can run one monitor from the normal monitor port and another from a USB port but you need a special connector which makes the Air think it has a 2nd monitor attached. Here's an example on YouTube You need something like the Matrox Dual Head 2 Go which allows you to have multiple monitors with your MacBook. The performance of USB-attached ...


3

I'm seeing on Apples site that the system requirements are as follows: Thunderbolt-enabled Mac computer, including MacBook Air, MacBook Pro, Mac mini, and iMac OS X v10.6.8 or later That means it must be Thunderbolt enabled.



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