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13

lsof is indeed your best bet the fastest and easiest way would be this :- lsof | grep /Volumes/myDrive Which would give you a list of open files on the disk.


8

Open Terminal.app and run df -h /: % df -h / Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on /dev/disk1s2 111Gi 75Gi 36Gi 68% / On my machine my OS drive is on /dev/disk1s2. With this information you can use the Disk Utility app and find out what physical drive your OS is on: Using diskutil from command line you're OS drive will be ...


3

Have you tried $ diskutil unmount /Volumes/Diskname ? Or $ diskutil unmount force /Volumes/Diskname ? As the manpage points out: Due to the complex and interwoven nature of Mac OS X, umount may fail often. It is recommended that diskutil(1) (as in, "diskutil unmount /mnt") be used instead. If your volume has spaces in the name, be sure to ...


3

It's not absolutely required, but I'd say it's strongly recommended. The type of volume corruption it reported isn't as serious as most other types, but my recommendation is the same: don't mess around, fix it now.


2

To Disable Automount Getting the UUID The first thing you will need is the volume's UUID (universal unique identifier) number, which can be found by opening Disk Utility, selecting the volume of interest, and then pressing Command+I or clicking the blue information button in the Disk Utility toolbar. In the window that appears, locate and copy the UUID, ...


2

Let's assume you are mounting/attaching your Data drive as usual which will result in paths like /Volumes/Data/ContentA and /Volumes/Data/ContentA. You can now do either of create symbolic links via Terminal by starting Terminal.app and running these commands ln -s /Volumes/Data/ContentA ~/ContentA ln -s /Volumes/Data/ContentB ~/ContentB open ...


2

You can find the information in /var/log/system.log (or using the Console application). But the information is not kept forever. For example: Aug 4 07:34:34 ******** kernel[0]: hfs: mounted External on device disk3 Aug 4 07:34:44 ******** kernel[0]: hfs: mounted Time Machine on device disk5 and and a DMG Aug 5 07:53:25 ******** kernel[0]: hfs: ...


1

You could try the donationware application "What's Keeping me?" that shows what process/application is using the volume/folder/file. This program is certified by the developer for Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard, but the RoaringApps page for this application lists it as working fine on OS X 10.7 Lion and OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion. About What's Keeping Me? ...


1

It is possible that you are using a disk driver such as fuse. If so, uninstall it. I also have a 2010 MacBookPro with an SSD in my optical bay and a 750 gig drive. I found myself in a similar situation; unable to boot because my data drive randomly became read only at reboot. The culprit was fuse. It decided to remove my mount point, and create a ...


1

After a lot of searching and much cursing, I think that this is really a problem that practically nobody is aware of or concerned about. Still, I was able to find a solution, it's not great, but it should work. The idea is to mount the DMG in a known directory with some random name -- this name (the last element in the -mountpoint path) will be the name ...


1

Open Terminal (located in /Applications/Utilities/Terminal.app) and type: disktutil cs list Then look for the entry of your standard drive, e.g. Name: Macintosh HD Look further down to find out the encryption type: Encryption Type: AES-XTS The latter is what I see when using this command in OS X 10.8.2, so you can assume ...


1

It can't hurt to repair permissions on your actual disk, but it is quite unnecessary, because "Macintosh HD" contains the actual operating system, so the stuff that you want to repair.


1

You can stop Mac OS X unmounting user disks on log-out. This behaviour is controlled with a default (preference). In this discussion on the Apple Support Community, Király shares the appropriate command to issue: defaults write /Library/Preferences/SystemConfiguration/autodiskmount AutomountDisksWithoutUserLogin -bool YES This command needs to be entered ...



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