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Apple's tools won't shrink the Bootcamp partition, so you have several options: get a third party tool to back up Bootcamp and/or shrink it outright install OS X on an external drive and run it there (basically punt) There's a slight chance you have a siruation that could be remedied from he command line. Post the diskutil list details that Disk Utility ...


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You first have to remove the swap partition and the visible Recovery HD with gpt and then you will be able to resize your Macintosh HD with Disk Utility. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pushing altcmdR while booting. Then open Terminal.app and enter (assuming disk0 is your main disk): gpt -r show /dev/disk0 Unmount your main disk with: diskutil ...


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I agree with Jens Erat for method 1. For a detailed tutorial, read this topic: INCREASE DISK AND PARTITION SIZE IN OS X Make sure that you understand what you are doing, take the time to write down the output of "gpt show dev/diskN" on a sheet of paper and double check it. Be careful that if there is a hidden recovery partition after the "Macintosh HD" ...


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You may not need to repair the disk! Is this an external drive you're sharing between a Mac and a Windows PC? I've had this issue a few times with a disk formatted FAT32. If you don't unmount your disk properly when you remove it from your Windows PC, the whole volume will be marked as "busy" and you'll be prompted to repair the volume if you look at it ...


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Executing /sbin/fsck -fy in Recovery Mode will verify/repair your recovery system (Base OS X System) instead of the corrupted CoreStorage Logical Volume: … ** Checking volume information. ** The volume OS X Base System appears to be OK. Unlock - if necessary - and mount your main volume (Macintosh HD) first, then verify/repair it with Disk ...


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The reported error is minor. You haven't told us what kind of Mac or what disk it has. I suspect there are a couple of bad sectors, which have been removed. Try rebooting, and see if there is still a problem.


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If you can see your external drive in the disk utility app, there is no reason that it won't show up when you hit 'diskutil list'. If you still can't see it after 'diskutil list', try unplugging it then 'ls /dev/disk*' then replug it and redo 'ls /dev/disk*' and see if another disk appeared. (It should be disk2s2 or disk2s1) then 'diskutil mount ...


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If you want better answers, try refining your question. Also, post a comment after my answer, so I will be notified. Question: 1) Recovery HD is visible, which, I could be mistaken, but this shouldn't be visible OR mounted in Disk Utility Answer: In the MBR partition table, the id should be AB and you have AF. In the GPT, the partition type should ...


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Try this! I got the same problem last week. Boot with "Option/ALT startup". Launch the terminal. Execute: umount -f /Volumes/enter_your_diskname Hope this works!


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I had the same problem. Restart, and while machine is restarting, hold down Command key and the R key simultaneously. Hold down until the Apple icon appears, then release both keys. Four options will come up-- choose Disk Utility. Continue with Erase Free Space procedure as usual. First attempt worked for me, after 6 months of frustration. Best of luck! ...


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It's indeed impossible to create a third regular partition in Disk Utility. The +-button is greyed out (please check the screenshot below): The superior HDD is my CoreStorage Volume Group, the inferior HDD is my CoreStorage Volume (spanning over disk1s2 and disk2s2) and HDD 2 is a simple JHFS+ non-CoreStorage volume. The complete volume list and the ...


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The method to repair your disk and recover the GUID partition table is related to my answers to similar questions: HFS+ invalid number of allocation blocks and Hard drive no longer accessible. Basically you have to find characteristic strings of JHFS+ volumes, use some simple math and common sense and have some luck to fix the GUID. And don't loose sight of ...


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You could try booting into internet recovery (hold Command+Option+R during boot) once there open disk utility and try partitioning again.


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The simplest thing is to delete the "Data" partition and resize the Mac partition to take the whole area. At that point, you are one click away from running BootCamp Assistant. Options are to use Disk Utility to make an image of Data to an external drive (or perhaps to Macintosh HD if there is space). Another option is to clean as much files off Data or ...


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The best thing to do, to avoid major data loss, is to: copy personal files and folders from the TM disk image (they do not have symlinks, so no problem whatsoever). Obviously choose the latest backup. from the TM disk image write down on a piece of paper an entire list of all the apps in the Application folder and reinstall them from scratch (depending on ...


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I've had this problem before. I think it is because the data is corrupt. What you need to do is restore the drive and create a new one. The easy way is to get a different computer and reformat it there, but if not, don't worry. Just go into Disk Utility and attempt to restore/reformat the drive. If it gives you an error like "Can't unmount the disk", follow ...


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The drive could be failing. Try to format again with disk utility , setup time machine backup then start creating full backup again.


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I actually figured it out myself. All I had to do was turn off FileVault and restart the system. Disk Utility works normally now.


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Absolutely - this is a good plan in general - having a bootable backup in addition to a Time Machine interval backup. I like to get a SD card / micro SD card and install an emergency boot OS with just enough tools to fix any situation. How do I make a bootable USB flash drive for a MacBook Air? I would do that before making any changes. Next, you will ...


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diskutil unmountDisk force /Volumes/VOLUMENAME


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In Disk Utility, select the drive that you wish to partition, but select Repair in the bar with the options. Then, click Repair Disk Permissions in the bottom right. Repairing Disk Permissions isn't guaranteed to fix your problem, but it's a great start.


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What you need to do is reset your whole system. Note that if you did not back up applications or such, these will be gone. Boot into the Recovery Partition, and erase your hard disk. You can do this by going to the Disk Utility and selecting your hard disk. (Your Mac's hard disk, NOT your Time Machine backup of course.) There are a couple of tabs at the ...


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Since it says you need to reformat, what you need to do is: Boot into the Recovery Partition Click "Disk Utility" Select "Macintosh HD" Go to the "Erase" tab Select the format as "Mac OS Extended (Journaled)" Choose a security option from the security option section(I would recommend zero-pass since this is still your Mac) NOTE: If you have an SSD, the ...


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Connect in target mode to back up any critical files that are not backed up Boot to recovery and run Disk Utility there to repair the drive. If that fails, Boot to internet recovery and see about reinstalling the OS. Boot to internet recovery and wipe the drive and install Get hardware repair


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The issue I was experiencing was due to a firmware lock, likely triggered via iCloud. Because it is a late 2012 model, bypassing the lock is no longer possible by removing a stick of RAM and resetting the PRAM. It is locked-out by an EFI chip that executes the lock routine before booting. My only options er on the side of more extreme hacking (via reflow ...


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You could use dd to clone the partition bit by bit. Be sure to use the rdisk instead of the disk (should be much faster). Example: sudo dd if=/dev/rdisk6s1 of=/dev/rdisk7s1


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This means the hard drive is encrypted. Boot the machine up, go to System Preferences > Security > FileVault and enter the password to decrypt the volume. EDIT: If you don't have access to the drive/password, force boot to Internet Recovery by holding [CMD] + [OPTION] + [R] and you should see a spinning globe (you'll need to have Internet access). More ...


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I had the same issue. I was able to fix it in an interesting way. I have been testing El Capitan on an external drive. So, I thought, why not try Disk Utility using OS 10.11.x and (after the second pass) it repaired the drive. As the Beta was on a separate disk, and the Macintosh HD was unmounted at the time, it was analyzed and repaired. Just like ...


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The lock switch on the card was not locked, but after locking and unlocking it (turning it off and back on) again, it worked fine. Problem solved.


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As the gpt command reveals you have two recovery partitions (and a lot of unallocated disk space after partition 4): partition 3 with a wrong size and a correct hexGUID (426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC) partition 4 with a correct size (1269536 blocks) and a wrong hexGUID & visibility The second Recovery HD (slightly visible below the Macintosh ...


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The naming scheme for non-CoreStorage devices/volumes looks like this: (hard-coded) name of the disk device EFI (invisible in non-tweaked Disk Utility) Volume 1 (usually Macintosh HD) Volume 2 (optional) ... (optional further volumes) Recovery HD (invisible) And the naming scheme for CoreStorage devices/volumes looks like this (a Fusion-disk has an ...


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Launch the Terminal and type: diskutil resizeVolume You'll see parameter options you can choose and go from there.


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According to this article the "WD Thunderbolt Duo 6TB" misses - in contrast to the Pegasus2 series - one essential thing to be able to create a hardware RAID: a hardware RAID controller(-chip). So whether you use Disk Utility or the native Western Digital tools you will only get a software RAID. Even with an hardware RAID controller inside an arbitrary ...


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Boot Camp using Apple's supported way is a bit rigid compared to other partitioning. If you want to add the last 13 GB of your Hard Drive to the Boot Camp partition, you may want to try it from within Windows and see, if you can resize it there. Trying to add the 13 GB to your Macintosh HD, you will need to know how partitioning works in general, which is ...


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What partition were you running from when you took that screenshot? If Macintosh HD is your boot partition, you may have to boot into the recovery partition in order to modify it.


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Take a look at Time Machine, it may be keeping local snapshots. From Apple Support: Because Time Machine removes local snapshots as needed, Finder and Get Info windows don't include them in their calculations. To see how much storage space local snapshots are using, choose About This Mac from the Apple menu, then click Storage. The space used by local ...


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It was the Time Machine local backups. After running: sudo tmutil disablelocal I have my space back! The /Volumes/MobileBackups/ folder was enormous. I never use Time Machine aside from restoring from a catastrophic failure, and I don't know if I've ever touched the Time Machine GUI - so the local backups were completely unnecessary for me.


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I can suggest you to try Disk Inventory X (http://www.derlien.com) It has a visual preview for the size of each file and different colors for groups of files/etc.



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