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Try the following steps: Shut down the computer and reboot it while pressing Alt/Option. In the boot picker choose your recovery partition (name can vary, depending on your language settings). In the recovery partition launch disc utility and perform the steps you tried already.


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You need to reinstall Mac OS X Backup your system/data. Boot into Internet Recovery (CMD + R + i) Open Terminal Erase your Macintosh HD Volume diskutil cs deleteVolume 933B0D1B-9E56-4DB3-8853-013BE1C2C6E4 Erase Macintosh Volume Group diskutil cs delete 320B77F3-91C2-4221-B24C-D8B91C233D32 Erase SSD this should disk0, verify! diskutil ...


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It because Disk Utility doesn't recognize all errors. I had the same issue before, and I fixed it by following the instructions on the onyx's Known Problem page and this guide to run fsck -fy under Single User mode


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It is, in fact, not gone as mentioned by Klanomath. To securely erase a disk, select the physical volume (no indentation on the sidebar list), select "Erase" from the toolbar and an option for "Security Options..." should be there. Within the menu, there is a slider that allows you to choose between one pass, three passes, seven passes and 35 passes. This ...


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The secure erase feature indeed seems to be gone (or it's a bug). Open Terminal and enter diskutil list to see a list of your attached drives. In the following example, notice a pair of drives are identified: /dev/disk0 (internal) and /dev/disk2 (external) - disk1 is related with the Apple CoreStorage partition disk0s2. your_prompt_here% diskutil list ...


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You are not seeing the drive because has no more partition on it. What you have done is written every sector, including the super important ones like the partition table, with random numbers. When you boot USB (I am assuming you are booting an OS X installer off of USB), you need to launch Disk Utility. It will be under the "Tools" menu. Partition your ...


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Use the following steps. Open the Disk Utility application. Highlight the appropriate drive. Below is an example. Click the the icon labeled Partition. The following popup pane will appear. Determine the size you want for the new partition. Subtract this value from the size of the current partition. In this example, I need a 30 GB partition, so the ...


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The Terminal application commands are shown below. diskutil erasevolume "Free Space" "" /dev/disk0s4 diskutil cs resizestack D7989525-A492-467F-9631-6214317713EE 0 The first command deletes your 54 GB Untitled partition. The second command merges all the free space back in to the other partition.


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Could not restore - Device not configured Means bad USB drive and need to replace it. If you drive encrypted you are not able to check this in another macbook because ist encrypted with your own and the UUID of the local system. If you able to open the drive at your current system, check the storage capacity of the drive it is very full you also get ...


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The outcome you're seeing is probably a (security) feature, not a bug. I would think that Disk Utility would prompt for a password to enable access to the encrypted drive before allowing it to be read in order to perform the restore. Before attempting the restore use the Terminal command string "diskutil corestorage unlockVolume UUID -stdinpassphrase" ...


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I suspect that your hard drive is in the process of crashing. I am basing my reasoning off this statement: My OS is corrupted, that is the reason why I want to do a fresh installation. With corrupted I mean, I can boot my system only if I go to single-mode and mount the hard drive with mount -uw / and then exit. But this is not a long term ...


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You should be able to load Disk Utility from the OS X Installation. When you boot into recovery mode, have a look at the menu bar at the top of the screen and there should be a utilities drop down with Disk Utility in there. From that Disk Utility you should have no problem formatting your drive.


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I was able to resolve this by booting through internet recovery command+option+r and run disk utility. I was able to delete 3 partitions and after reboot i was now able to run bootcamp assistant once again.


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The use of Core Storage seems to be a common denominator in problems similar to mine. I used the sudo diskutil cs revert [Logical Volume guid] command in the Terminal application to get rid of Core Storage, and then restarted. Presto! My missing GBs were returned. The above command can only be used if the command diskutil cs list shows the Logical ...


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You can try entering in Single User Mode and do an fsck on the hard drive. To enter single user mode, turn on your computer and immediately after press the Command s. This will load you to a terminal looking screen. Let it run its pre-checks. After it is done there should be two commands to run: a command to mount the drive a command to run fsck on ...


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To correct the GUID error in your GPT, you need to start up from OS X Recovery over the Internet. Press and hold the command(⌘)optionR keys immediately after you turn on your Mac and hear the startup sound. For more information see the site: OS X: About OS X Recovery. Once started to OS X Recovery, select the Terminal application from the menu bar. Enter the ...


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Much Better way to do this, you don't need to format at all, as the drive can be reverted. Apparently a lot of the commands relating to this are undocumented? I have no idea really but I had to go through the same process to get disk utilities to allow me to do anything related to partitioning. Here ...


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You can use Unetbootin to copy the Linux ISO to 1.2GB partition(disk4s3). If I were you though I would first rewrite the partition type as GPT instead of APM by running: diskutil partitionDisk disk4 GPT fat32 Linux 10% ExFat d2 10% ExFat d3 80% Then select the Linux partition on disk4 in UNetbootin to be the destination for the ISO copy.


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Based on your hexdump, I have determined a NTFS partition existed immediately after the last partition shown in your GUID Partition Table (GPT). The hexdump also shows the size of this deleted partition. The values printed by hexdump are described in the table show in the section titled Partition Boot Sector from the Wikipedia site NTFS. Using this ...


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I eventually made a call with Apple support. They asked me to use the option first aid in Disk Utility, this didn't help. They then asked me to reboot my iMac in recovery mode and do the same thing again. This also didn't help. After these two options to repair my partition, they asked me to back-up whole drive and reinstall OSX. They told me that this ...


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In my case, I had already disabled FileVault on my primary partition to allow Boot Camp Assistant to resize the primary partition to accommodate a BOOTCAMP partition, but after manually deleting the partition, Disk Utility couldn't (wouldn't?) resize the primary to max while it was mounted to filesystem root. I rebooted to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing ...


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I'm combining some of my comment into an answer as I believe it address the fstab issue. As you've already found out, the mount command cannot use UUID or LABEL and must use the Disk Identifier, e.g. /dev/disk0s4. Additionally as perhapsmaybeharry pointed out that the OS X method is to use diskutil. To address your update... However fstab can use the UUID ...


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I have made a fork of fuse-ext2 which installs everything in /Library and /usr/local, so that you don't have to disable SIP in Mac OS X El Capitan. Glad if you try it ;-).


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When using OS X, it's usually more advisable to use diskutil for disk-related activities. TL;DR: To mount a volume/disk by identifier: diskutil mount /dev/diskXsY # mounts just that volume diskutil mountDisk /dev/diskX # mounts the whole disk To mount a volume by UUID: diskutil mount [Volume/Partition UUID] To mount a volume by label: ...


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This is the only way I've ever done it via the Mac OS X Terminal. diskutil list The above lists all connected drives, including their drive identifiers. I know you already have these, just providing it as another method and also as a way to confirm your info. Now, to mount your drive (using your example of "disk0s4" as your device identifier): diskutil ...


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To most easily resolve this, you need to erase your USB drive with a "Master Boot Record" scheme. Steps: Open Disk Utility Select the USB drive Click "Erase" Choose Format "MS-DOS (FAT)" MOST IMPORTANT: Choose Scheme "Master Boot Record" Click Erase button Many thanks to nholtappels for figuring out the problem!


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I found that this worked for a USB drive to erase and format it as HFS+ with journaling. sudo diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ 'My disk name' diskX Where X is a number. First run sudo diskutil list to find the relevant disk3, etc - check the size and make sure it's the right disk!


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Probably the upgrade to El Capitan and the conversion of your main OS X volume (disk0s2) to a CoreStorage volume (disk0s2 & disk1) wreak havoc with the GUID partition table entry of your Boot Camp partition. You partition table should look similar to this one: ... 325312736 1269536 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC 326582272 ...


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Actually I'm a newbie to the OS X operating systems. After long time scavenging through the forums I finally found a answer for that. Most of the people said it's a normal issue in the mac operating systems. It's because of the Spotlight indexing issue. If you guys have any trouble like this, use this method to solve your issues. I dropped here the link that ...



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