Tag Info

New answers tagged

1

Disk Utility will not fix every conceivable disk corruption issue. For that you need third-party apps. I use Diskwarrior and have also had success with Drive Genius. However there is one way to do this without buying a disk repair utility. Back up your hard drive, partition/reformat it, reinstall the OS and restore your backup. Yeah it's more complicated ...


0

It seems that after a little more research, I was able to recover my issue with a more aggressive fsck_hfs -drfs /dev/disk0s2 call.


-1

Note that i made a wrong action by globally changing permissions in the var folder. After reinstalling system, still had problems to open dmg files The DiskUtility announced the following issues : Permissions differ on "private/var/db/ConfigurationProfiles"; should be drwxr-xr-x ; they are drwsr-s--T Warning: SUID file ...


0

If you have two Machintosh HDs together, choose the second (indented) one. You may need to unlock it via the context menu. Then tell Disk Utility to create an image of the volume directly. In Disk Utility with the Macintosh HD volume selected, use New disk image on the toolbar or select New > Disk Image from "Macintosh HD" from the File menu. Bear in mind ...


0

The solution that works on both OS 10.11 El Capitan and on OS 10.10 Yosemite is: Open up Disk Utility Select the actual drive, which is the lower part that will most likely be greyed out: Then go to Erase Select MAC OS EXTENDED (Journaled, Encrypted) It's important to select Encrypted Then enter a password and wait.(It will run without a problem ) Then you ...


0

When updating to Yosemite you will want to make sure that you are at least running 10.6.8. Running the early versions of 10.6 when updating to Yosemite, will cause errors. You will also want to make sure that the TRIM has been disabled. Please take a look at this OWC Blog post for instructions: ...


0

I found another solution. It may take time though. You need to try reinstalling windows by using bootcamp and then uninstall it. When you ask bootcamp to delete the partition used for windows, it will also "delete" the free space. It worked for me.


1

The following page has a lot of explanation on it but I've provided the quick steps below. Side note, try verify and repair and fix permissions in the app first to see if that does it. Erase disk via terminal Start in terminal with this command: diskutil list Next verify and repair the usb drive with this command putting the disk name I where it says ...


0

What does Finder report? How about turning Time Machine off and then back on? (deletes local snapshots) Also maybe try Disk Utility>First Aid>Repair Disk Have you tried copying a large amount of data to these partitions? Copy something big to get to 90% maybe and then copy more and see when it says it's full. Sometimes Disk Utility reports incorrect capacity ...


0

You may be [not] seeing the other partitions on the drive, Recovery & EFI, which will be contributing to that 'extra' space. Try enabling the debug menu in Disk Utility, then enabling all partition view… Quit Disk Utility Open the Terminal utility Run the following Command: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1 Relaunch Disk ...


3

Sorry to hear of your situation. The first megabyte will have included the drive's partition and critical structural information. If you can, dd all the remaining content to another drive as a back-up of sorts. Then I suspect your best choice is a professional repair service or a tool like DiskWarrior: DiskWarrior Everything just disappeared after ...


0

I have found that when Disk Utility can't repair a disk then it is time for DiskWarrior or another third-party disk repair utility. They can often fix what Disk Utility can not. However that the issue went away, seemingly by magic, makes Froggard's guess probable. I would, however, keep an eye on the disk with disk utility. Use the verify function from ...


1

ran into the same problem and found this article that fixes it a little easier Just run diskutil coreStorage list, find the logical volume uuid, and then run diskutil coreStorage revert (that uuid) in your case diskutil coreStorage revert 2F7B1893-07E8-4194-840B-F2552042E055 http://awesometoast.com/yosemite-core-storage-and-partition-woes/


1

Basically you have to delete the linux partitions (disk0s4 and disk0s5) and then expand your CoreStorage volume (Macintosh HD) to the full size. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing altcmdR while booting Open Terminal in the menubar -> Utilities enter diskutil list and diskutil cs list to get the partition and the CoreStorage listing. Now unmount all ...


1

Update 2 Based on the current state of your MBR and GUID partition tables, I recommend the following steps to finish fixing your computer. I do not think it is necessary to boot to Internet Recovery Mode before entering these commands. Make a Time Machine or other form of backup. (Just in case.) Execute my Update 1 on /dev/disk0. Upon completion, the ...


0

Thanks to @tubedogg for linking me to this post and giving me the tips. To fix the issue I had to run the commands diskutil cs revert <disk id> and diskutil cs resizeStack (Not sure if that worked since I think it game me an error). I had to reboot for the effects to change and I partitioned my drive in recovery mode (think you can do it within OS X ...


0

You need to buy a new drive onto which you will copy your data from the borked drive. Preferably, this new drive will be a brand other than Seagate, which has the worst failure records in the industry. Once you have safely copied your data to the new drive, you can then begin to worry about how to deal with the Seagate drive.


0

You can try following these steps: run the following command in Terminal: diskutil list Find your disk label in the "NAME" column, and note the identifier all the way on the right (something like "disk#s#") Now run this command: diskutil unmount MISC Next run: sudo mkdir /Volumes/MISC && sudo mount -w -t exfat /dev/disk#s# /Volumes/MISC replacing ...


0

You will not be able to split your drive into more than two partitions and still be able to boot Windows. There is a hard limit on the number of partitions on the boot drive for Windows (may be for Mac and Linux too, not sure). You can certainly dual boot Mac and Windows (or Mac/Linux) but not all three on one drive. If you follow the instructions in ...


1

Disk Utility repair functions are (from what I have heard) just a front end to FSCK, so that will likely give you the same results. You could try another disk repair utility (diskWarrior, techtool, etc...), or if you have a recent backup I would be tempted to wipe the drive and start over. If you have another Mac you could put that Mac into target disk ...


3

If you format a drive as Encrypted, you are in fact turning on File Vault, as that's the only encryption layer that OS X supports. The main advantage of partitioning the drive as Journaled, and then turning on File Vault is that you can revert the drive to a simple unencrypted volume if you should choose to do so in the future. You can't do this with a ...


2

From the Tom's Hardware Forum: By default, the OSX disk utility creates a new partition as GUID. Windows can't read it. You need to create the partition type as MBR, which Windows can read. Then format as exFAT and both machines will read it.


3

How old is the drive? Flash memory has limited write cycles, and it will slowly change into a read-only device. If you have been writing stuff to the drive for a few years it is quite possible some blocks have reached their write limit and the controller has marked them as unusable. Cheaper drive -> fewer cycles. Also note that the one-pass-of-zeros secure ...


3

This is likely coming from one or two things (or both). Partitioning a disk, any disk, takes up drive space. In the megabyte range it is not even noticeable. In the gigabyte range it can be a substantial byte (sorry...) out of the drive. Also computer makers and Drive/RAM makers often calculate bytes differently. O/S companies (Apple, Microsoft, etc...) ...


1

It sounds like there is a problem with the USB installer. To confirm this, restart holding Option + R to return to Disk Utility, and verify you formatted the drive as "Mac OS X Extended (Journaled). If you have a working bootable usb, holding the "option" key should show you the Startup Manager menu: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204417 Here are a ...


1

Internet recovery loads from the internet and runs in RAM. Presumably you have more than 1.28GB of RAM. OS X Base System is the base system for recovery, not your internal drive. Based on that, it cannot see your internal drive at all. There's not much you can do if the computer itself can't see the drive. If there's any way you can get this into an Apple ...


0

I have solved this after two days of searching around the Internet. I am using MacBook Pro 15" retina, with another partition having Windows 8 created by Boot Camp in Mac. The question, when I run disk utility I don't see the "draggable" corner of the hard disk which I need to resize. This is my solution, I will write down step by step: Turn off the ...


0

diskutil cs revert turns off the Core Storage volume manager for that volume. The Yosemite installer turns it on in case it's needed later (mostly for FileVault), but if you don't actually need it (e.g. for FileVault a Fusion disk) it doesn't do anything useful. If you aren't using FileVault or a Fusion disk, what Core Storage mostly does is confuse Disk ...


1

You have to format the SSD without using it as your primary disk. If you're able to run Mac with the old disk, connect the SSD via external enclosure and format it (or make a clone of the running HDD). After this swap the disks, boot form installer and install OS on SSD.


0

Fundamentally the SMART data of your 2013 Macbook Air SSD is normal comparing it with my Apple SSD SD0128F (inside a Fusion drive). Probably some attribute names (namely Unexpected Power Loss Count and Program Fail Count Chip) provided by your SMART app are false: Using two different SMART utilities here, the ID# 174 has the attribute name Host_Reads_MiB ...


0

Posting this from my working OS! The problem was with selecting encryption when formatting the drive. I reformatted without, painstakingly downloaded Lion again and all seems to be working fine now.


0

That means that the computer can't find a boot image. Power off and then boot with option held down. If any bootable volumes are connected, you can choose them. If no bootable volumes are connected, make one (internet recovery or use another Mac) and then connect it.


0

It seems that you may be trying to fsck the wrong partition. You can use duskutil to find which disk is your boot disk diskutil list You're looking for something named usually "Macintosh HD" or "Yosemite". Try the fsck on that, and if you're still getting the "Resource busy" error, try to unmount it, either in the Disk Utility in recovery, or by using ...


0

Try this http://www.macworld.co.uk/news/mac/steps-take-when-your-mac-wont-start-3423817/ You could start with resetting the NVRAM. Just try a few things from the above URL—might help to resolve the issue. Reset the NVRAM, because why not? In the PowerPC days, we talked about resetting the PRAM. On modern Macs, the real term is resetting the NVRAM. ...


0

You want to run diskutil coreStorage unlockVolume <UUID>, where the UUID is the Disk Identifier associated with your encrypted disk, /dev/disk3. You can get the identifier by running diskutil list in the terminal and looking for the output related to /dev/disk3. The identifier is a long string that would look something like this ...


-1

I've done some more research and found out that at least JDiskReport has this functionality.


0

You could simply take a picture of a portion of the window that contains what you want with command + shift + 4, and use the cursor to select, or use command + shift + 4 then space bar and select the entire window.


0

As stated above, this is a known bug issue. However, booting to the recovery partition (CMD + R while booting up) or by holding down Option to boot to a USB recovery drive (for those of us with home-brew FusionDrives who haven't gotten around to setting up a Recovery partition again), the process seems to complete without issue.


2

Your main disk uses a Core Storage partition scheme: disk0 is your main system disk. disk1 is a "virtual" disk residing in disk0s2 containing the Macintosh HD volume visible on your desktop. The first two sectors of a Logical Volume contain zeros only. Examples: disk2 is the Core Storage Volume pooling disk0s2 (SSD) and disk1s2 (HDD) of a 3.1 TB ...



Top 50 recent answers are included