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I like to do things a little differently and this involves separating the problem into two distinct parts - OS and Hardware. Let's look at hardware first. I like to use Ultimate Boot CD as it has a number of great utilities to test out your Mac. It runs on Linux so it completely eliminates OS X from the equation. And if you are wondering, yes, this will ...


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Basically the same applies as in this question and the accepted answer. The only difference is that you have a fusion drive and therefore some DiskIdentifiers differ. Additionally you have a blocking partition on your HDD with certainty which has to be removed. There is one undocumented command to resize or expand a CoreStorage volume group and an inherent ...


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BEFORE you follow my instructions, take a Time Machine backup of everything. I'm going to have you destroy and recreate the Fusion Drive, which WILL erase your data. To see these instructions with pictures, you can go to the sources I used: Splitting a Fusion Drive and creating your own Fusion Drive. Boot into the Recovery HD (or from a bootable drive, if ...


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I recently ran into this issue as well. I originally suspected a damaged SATA cable, but swapping the SSD into the optical drive bay and the HD into the primary hard drive bay solved the issue for me.


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In the off chance it is not a hardware problem with the cable, try creating GUID partitioned disk (GPT) with no partitions. This can not be done using the Disk Utility alone. To do so, follow these instructions. Open the Disk Utility. Highlight the disk and click on the Info button. Determine the Disk Identifier. In the example below, I used disk2. Close ...


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That's how companies like Prosoft (Data Recovery), Micromat (Tech Tool), Cleverfiles (Disk Drill) & Alsoft (DiskWarrior) make their money. They each have different ways of protecting or recovering your data. Data Rescue & Disk Drill are designed to recover files after the type of incident you mentioned. Tech Tool goes further, by cataloguing each ...


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Short answer: yes, it's because of FileVault (well, actually Core Storage, but that's required for FileVault). It's normal for the startup manager (Option key at startup) to only show one volume in this mode, but Command-R should still work to start in recovery mode. If Command-R is not working, I'm not sure what the problem there is. Long answer: starting ...


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Using Repair Disk in Disk Utility on this volume did the trick.


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If your main partition is encrypted it will not be unlocked and mounted after booting to Recovery Mode. After starting Disk Utility you have to unlock the volume first. Then enter the FileVault2 password. The volume will be mounted automatically after entering the proper password. Now verify or repair your main volume.


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Plug it into the PC, make sure it mounts and you can read and write to the drive, make a note of the drive letter. Open a command prompt as administrator and issue this command chkdsk x: /F /X the "x:" is the drive letter of your drive. /F tells it to fix any problems and /X tells it to dismount the disk so it can work on the drive. When that is done ...


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It is likely that the drive is toast. Disk utility is designed to see everything on any bus that looks like a drive. You could try zapping the PRAM, or as the kids call it these days, "resetting the SMC." Google will help you find instructions for that. Failing that you could try putting the internal drive in an external enclosure, which will mostly tell ...


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Short answer, No - that's what encryption is for, to prevent anyone getting in who doesn't know the password.


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SuperDuper specifically says it copies files, and not even every file. The OP is asking to copy the entire image of the hard drive sector by sector. So far the only method I've found is DD. Even Acronis for Mac doesn't seem to do a raw image.


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If you are able to mount the drive, you can use Copy Copy Cloner or even better (IMO) SuperDuper! from Shirt Pocket. SuperDuper! will not copy caches and unnecessary files that are re-created upon boot, saving space. These both give you clones of the drive, but not images. If you can restore the clone, then this might work. If you're savvy with a Terminal, ...


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The short, simple answer is DeployStudio. It's free and it's built for the exact purpose of creating and deploying OS X images. It can run in a standalone configuration or it can be configured on a server to capture and deploy images over a network. It has a host of post-flight operations available including performing Active and Open Directory binding. ...


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Just let it sit - I have the same EXACT situation and while I was researching online, it just "popped up" and was available. It seemed like my good computer was trying to fix the bad computer first, before it mounted as ext hd. Hope this helps.


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The issue persisted across multiple macs but Windows 7's Disk Management tool didn't seem to have any issues creating a new partition table. Afterwards the drive worked as expected on OS X.


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If disk utility does not even see it the electronics in the drive may have failed. System Profiler may show a drive there but if disk utility cant access it, well... "Houston we have a problem." If it IS an external you could try unplugging any other USB devices and/or trying another USB port and possibly even a different USB cable. If you can easily open ...


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The message from Disk Utility is simply there to tell you it's checking the hidden EFI partition (if present) and updating as necessary. In your case it won't be necessary so nothing will be updated. Disk Utility performs this extra step if you run a disk repair on a parent disk rather than on one of the partitions within that disk.


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I suspect Windows` chkdsk or another Microsoft tool to erroneously repairing the partition table of your device containing the EXFAT volume. The result of sudo gpt -r -vv show /dev/disk2 of my 4 TB device created in a VM and formatted with Disk Utility in comparison looks like this: gpt -r -vv show /dev/disk2 gpt show: /dev/disk2: mediasize=4000655081472; ...



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