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0

I found that this worked for a USB drive to erase and format it as HFS+ with journaling. sudo diskutil eraseDisk JHFS+ 'My disk name' diskX Where X is a number. First run sudo diskutil list to find the relevant disk3, etc - check the size and make sure it's the right disk!


1

Probably the upgrade to El Capitan and the conversion of your main OS X volume (disk0s2) to a CoreStorage volume (disk0s2 & disk1) wreak havoc with the GUID partition table entry of your Boot Camp partition. You partition table should look similar to this one: ... 325312736 1269536 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC 326582272 ...


0

Actually I'm a newbie to the OS X operating systems. After long time scavenging through the forums I finally found a answer for that. Most of the people said it's a normal issue in the mac operating systems. It's because of the Spotlight indexing issue. If you guys have any trouble like this, use this method to solve your issues. I dropped here the link that ...


4

Your main volume is encrypted with FileVault and still locked – consequently it doesn't show up in /Volumes. Before being able to mount it you'd have to unlock it: diskutil cs unlockVolume lvUUID #replace lvUUID by the one shown in the diskutil listing You will then be asked to enter the passphrase/password. You have to enter a passphrase or a password of ...


1

You show in your posted image that the partition is encrypted. I was unaware a partition could be encrypted without using core storage. Anyway, I believe the correct command to fix your drive is given below. sudo diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 R The command should move /dev/disk0s3 to the bottom of disk0 while resizing /dev/disk0s2 to maximum ...


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The proper command to resize your main volume to completely fill your disk is: diskutil resizeVolume disk0s2 0 Usually you have to enter a size like 249g but 0 acts as a magic number and resizes to full size (fit to fill) while moving Recovery HD automatically.


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Try to return everything back: diskutil resizevolume disk0s2 R and then: diskutil resizeVolume disk0s2 480G jhfsx InstallOSX 10G Resizing a volume that is currently set as the computer’s startup disk will invalidate that setting; use the Startup Disk System Preferences panel or bless (8) to reset the resized volume as the startup disk.


0

This is really terrifying that the only answer suggest to overwrite your gpt table. The correct and safest solution, with explanation, is from this comment. download GParted-Live CD from http://www.gparted.org/download.php boot from this CD accept the suggestion to enable the full disk reboot from mac OSX try again – now you can resize it! Explanation: ...


0

diskutil erasevolume "Free Space" "" /dev/disk0s4 diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 R The first command will remove partition /dev/disk0s4. The second command will move /dev/disk0s3 to the bottom of disk0 while resizing /dev/disk0s2 to maximum size.


0

The command diskutil mergePartitions HFS+ Name disk0sx disk0sy will merge all disk slices from disk0sx to disk0sy while only data on the first disk partition in the command (i.e. disk0sx) won't be erased. In your case disk0s2, disk0s3 and disk0s4 will be merged into disk0s2. Consequently you will lose your Recover HD partition. If the volume name contains ...


2

Option 1: Disk Utility In Disk Utility: select the image in the sidebar, then File → Change Password... (You must unmount the image before you can reset it). Option 2: Terminal In Terminal: hdiutil chpass <image> More info: man hdiutil


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There is no direct way, that I know of, natively in OS X to edit the volume label/name of an ISO Image as can be done by using, e.g., UltraISO in Windows. In other words, with the proper preferences set for UltraISO the volume label/name can be changed and saved to the ISO Image without recompiling it. I actually use UltraISO under OS X via Wine for this ...


-1

If I infer correctly, you have: an ISO named myiso.iso and said ISO mounts as myweirdname. You can try, from the command line: diskutil rename /dev/diskx somebettername where /dev/diskx is the disk identifier of your disk (found through diskutil list) Or, if you prefer, through the GUI: mount your ISO, select it from /Volumes, press Enter and ...


0

I booted into Internet Recovery Mode, erased the entire hard drive, and re-installed Mac OS X. This will reinstall the OS that came with the computer, recreate EFI and Recovery Mode partitions, and set CoreStorage volumes as if everything is set from factory defaults. After this Recovery Mode works as expected.


2

You are using the command incorrectly. When issuing diskutil unmount, you should refer to a partition. You are referring to an entire disk. For example disk0 refers to the entire disk, where as, disk0s1 refers to partition 1 on disk 0. The letter s stands for slice which is another word for partition. On the other hand, it is Ok to refer to either the ...


2

From man diskutil: unmount | umount [force] device Unmount a single volume. Force will force-unmount the volume (less kind to any open files; see also umount (8)). unmountDisk | umountDisk [force] device Unmount an entire disk (all volumes). Force will force-unmount the volumes (less kind to any open files; see also umount (8)). ...


0

Hold down the Command ⌘OptionR keys at startup to boot to OS X Internet Recovery. Once you have started your Mac in OS X Internet Recovery mode, you need to use the gpt command to remove the unneeded partitions. You can then expand your core storage partition to recovery the freed space back into your OS X partition. To use the gpt command, you need to ...


2

Remove all external disks (just for safety reasons). If possible also remove all internal disks except the boot disk or "refresh" your backups. The proposed command (dd) used improperly can be deadly for your data. Open Terminal.app and get the disk identifier of the disk containing the DVD partition: diskutil list Unmount the disk: #replace diskX by ...


0

Your CoreStorage Logical Volume Group is missing a Physical Volume with the UUID DDD40234-2DC7-44B2-BE95-D9C0FA46F96A. Your internal drive probably is (or worse: was) a Fusion Drive and the SSD part is missing. The SSD is either damaged or has to be reseated, if it doesn't show up entering diskutil list or if it shows up: the internal structure of the LVG ...


0

Running Diskutil in command line mode is pretty much the same as running it in the GUI and that is the right way to go: select the disk and click on repair. Or do it the way "perhapsmaybeharry" indicated. Either should work. If that fails you may need to try a dedicated disk repair program (I use Diskwarrior but there are others that work well too). Likely ...


1

The disk "Flash Player" is still attached to the filesystem. Go into /Volumes, and you should see it there. There are two ways to proceed, the GUI method, or the command line method. Use whichever you are most comfortable with. GUI: Navigate to /Volumes and press ⌘ Command+E. This will eject the volume. CLI: diskutil eject /dev/diskx, in this case disk35. ...


0

If you format the BOOTCAMP partition as MS-DOS (FAT), then you should be able to use the Boot Camp Assistant application to remove the partition. If this fails, then commands can be entered in a Terminal application window to remove the partition. I will not post these commands unless necessary.


-1

From Terminal: diskutil eraseVolume exFAT AAA disk0s4 where AAA - name of the new exFat partition, which you can delete in Disk Utility


3

Boot to Recovery Mode (hold cmdR while booting). In the menubar open Utilities -> Terminal. Now change your working directory and go to /Volumes: cd /Volumes List all volumes: ls -l Move to your main volume cd name_of_main_volume Now you can move forward to a directory to remove files and folders with cd folder_name. Appropriate paths to remove ...


5

It depends on your viewpoint: a file written to an encrypted disk image is immediately written encrypted to the HDD/SSD where the disk image resides. Since the file system of the unlocked disk image is still mounted, the file appears as "unencrypted". So a user, who can access the raw HDD/SSD only, can't read/decode the file content, but a user with the ...


-2

No, not directly (in the sense that the file is protected) the file that you add to an encrypted disk image will not be encrypted, or locked, until you unmount / eject your disk image. When your disk image is unmounted the entire disk image will re-encrypt itself and by side effect protect the file you added.


0

Try to use Single User Mode to repair the disk. Restart your mac holding command + S Wait until you see small # sign. Type fsck -fy You should see The volume (name of the volume) appears to be OK If not - keep repeating the same command Hope that helps ;) UPDATE To change a volume you can try to: # cd /Volumes/"Name of Volume" in your case ...


0

Can you go into your files and see what the general date of "Modification" for disk util, bluetooth, bootcamp, etc. All the SIP protected applications should all be roughly one date. I ask because if you didn't get updated properly, disk util got left behind and you need the combo updater I believe. 10.11.3 if you didn't want to update: 10.11.3 Combo ...


1

In Disk Utility find the HDD you are trying to format in the left hand column. Select the disk and not the volume - that appears as child under it - to repartition it. Just choosing the volume erases or replaces the file system but not the partition table type. This may apparently fail if the partition map is mal-formed. If you feel confident with ...


1

By accident I tried to install OS X to the OS X Installer DVD iso file (mounted to the virtual VBOX CD-ROM device) itself. Erasing/partitioning the VBOX HARDDISK disk (see images in question) and creating a new HFS+ Journaled formatted volume seems to work.


0

I had a similar problem and the following the method of the link below helped me. https://perrohunter.com/repair-a-mac-os-x-hfs-partition-table/#comment-127930


0

Go into Disk Utility click on the partition of the Swap Space. Go to the "Erase" tab and erase it with the format Mac OS Extended. Then click on the hard drive and erase the partition.


1

I had this issue and couldn't resolve it this way because I had a 4gb swap drive (ubuntu linux) that needed to be turned off before disk utility could remove it. Steps: boot to to Ubuntu Live CD (I used an EFI boot via usb) open gparted via terminal $ sudo gparted look for a partition with a key symbol on it's same line right click the key symbol and ...


0

If you have essential data on the drive and do not want to erase it you can usually copy all your data to another drive using FreeFileSync. It's free, extremely stable, and has a user friendly interface. It also gives you constant progress reports which is very reassuring. I used this on a 2TB Time Machine drive that failed and could not be repaired with ...



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