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11

After gaining some experience with CoreStorage volumes, I reworked my first answer to generalize and facilitate it by adding some scenarios and deleting some dispensable steps. Basically there is one undocumented command to resize or expand a CoreStorage volume group and an inherent logical volume: diskutil cs resizeStack LVUUID size The command ...


9

To be able to create a multi-boot environment you have to revert from a CoreStorage partition layout to a standard partition layout. Start to internet recovery mode by pressing altcmdR while booting. Open Terminal.app in the menubar Utilities → Terminal enter diskutil cs revert LVUUID and hit the ⏎ key. (LVUUID is the Logical Volume UUID. You get it by ...


8

The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is vastly undocumented and as such potentially destructive. There might be an easy way outlined first and a long winding, time consuming hard way. Please backup your Mac OS X before proceeding. The not-as-long-as-expected way: A 2nd computer or an iPhone with the stackexchange credentials to enter the site ...


7

I am astonished about complexity of this problem (see @klanomath answer) and easiness to create it. That's why I tried to play with it and found a work around. My problem was the following: I had 500GB-disk. I created 150GB-Macintosh-HD partition on this disk using Disk Utility, leaving 350GB as a "free space". When I tried to format the free space into ...


5

Theoretically everything is fine with your Fusion Drive. Fusion Drives look like this. Disk0 is your SSD with 121 GB and disk1 is your HDD with ~1 TB (~1.121 TB summed up). The larger parts of your SSD (disk0s2) and your HDD (disk1s2) are pooled to a CoreStorage LVG (Fusion Drive: disk3) with a size of 967.8 GB. The rest is reserved for EFIs, a Recovery HD ...


4

Basically you have a CoreStorage Logical Volume Group without a CoreStorage Logical Volume now. You may delete your Logical Volume Group (-> step 4) or restore a Logical Volume (-> step 7). Requirements: Booted to Recovery Mode Please quit Disk Utility. Open Utilities/Terminal in the menubar Enter diskutil cs list and hit enter. The output will look like ...


4

The original post mentions that SSDs have a 1000-2000 cycle limit, which over-simplifies the problem. Individual cells in an SSD may have such a limit, but the SSD implements many different solutions: from over-provisioning and write-levelling to Sandforce's proprietary collection of de-duplication, compression, and data differencing techniques, which it ...


3

To delete CoreStorage volumes you have to use the CLI: please backup your volume "mainHD" boot to Internet Recovery Mode (hit altcmdR immediately after the start-up chime) open Disk Utility and check/repair mainHD quit Disk Utility , open in the menubar Utilities/Terminal.app and enter diskutil cs deleteVolume LVUUID to delete the Logical Volume in your ...


3

I would suggest the Profile Management option that is included in OS X Server. It has all of the described above features and it is really easy to operate with. Take a look at https://www.apple.com/ca/osx/server/ it's $22.99 CAD.


3

If you format a drive as Encrypted, you are in fact turning on File Vault, as that's the only encryption layer that OS X supports. The main advantage of partitioning the drive as Journaled, and then turning on File Vault is that you can revert the drive to a simple unencrypted volume if you should choose to do so in the future. You can't do this with a ...


3

Sorry to hear of your situation. The first megabyte will have included the drive's partition and critical structural information. If you can, dd all the remaining content to another drive as a back-up of sorts. Then I suspect your best choice is a professional repair service or a tool like DiskWarrior: DiskWarrior Everything just disappeared after ...


3

This is likely coming from one or two things (or both). Partitioning a disk, any disk, takes up drive space. In the megabyte range it is not even noticeable. In the gigabyte range it can be a substantial byte (sorry...) out of the drive. Also computer makers and Drive/RAM makers often calculate bytes differently. O/S companies (Apple, Microsoft, etc...) ...


3

How old is the drive? Flash memory has limited write cycles, and it will slowly change into a read-only device. If you have been writing stuff to the drive for a few years it is quite possible some blocks have reached their write limit and the controller has marked them as unusable. Cheaper drive -> fewer cycles. Also note that the one-pass-of-zeros secure ...


3

Your volume Macintosh HD is a Core Storage Logical Volume and part of a Core Storage volume group and thus can't be modified by iPartition or Disk Utility. You have to boot from an external disk, a thumb drive or in the Internet Recovery Mode to be able to modify the volume with some Terminal commands. The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is ...


3

You cannot erase the currently-running volume. Shut the computer down, restart while holding the option key, and choose the Recovery HD. Find Disk Utility in the menus and you will now be able to erase your internal storage.


3

There are at least two approaches to solve your problem: One is potentially destructive, vastly undocumented and i don't know if it works (1) and the other one is for sure destructive (2). So please backup your Mac OS X and your Ubuntu partition if necessary. Requirements: USB thumb drive with a full working Mac OS X and iPartition installed or a Linux ...


3

I've figured it out! Though still appears that converting a dmg file to an encrypted one using Disk Utility is still broken as of OS X 10.10 (Yosemite), I've figured out a way to do it via terminal using this: hdiutil convert /PATH/TO/FILE -format UDZO -encryption AES-256 -o /OUTPUT/FILE This converts a dmg using AES-256 encryption and uses zlib ...


3

I had a similar problem. I created a 30 GB partition and after deleting it there was unused space. I couldn't manually get the original full partition back because of disk errors. So I booted into Recovery (Command + R), repaired the disk with Disk Utility and then the resize to original was no problem. Rebooted and now back to normal. Had no need to ...


3

I did fix this by resizing (making it a bit smaller) the Partition1. After doing this I was able to delete/resize all the other partitions. Well, I have no idea why this happened, so this is not a real solution but probably a bug of diskutil.


3

A clean install is not necessary, you simply need to reconfigure your NVRAM (nvram boot-args=kext-dev-mode=1) to disable the kext signing requirement for OS X. (After which, you can remove your TRIM enabler and reverse this change or leave it until the next time your NVRAM is changed/resets) A very clear explanation of OS X 10.10 Yosemite's new policy ...


2

When you plugin a damaged Apple_HFS disk into Mavericks/Yosemite it runs fsck_hfs on its own. You can see the output (in Terminal): tail -f /var/log/fsck_hfs.log Wait for it to finish before running repair yourself. Also repair needs to be run repeatedly to repair some errors. I recently needed to launch it 7 times but it repaired the disk successfully ...


2

You're using Apple's RAID which means you need a device which just hosts the discs and then your new laptop will see them and use the existing RAID structure. This rules out NAS. AS these are existing RAID arrays you can't simple merge them together to create a single new RAID. At least, you can't while keeping the data on them. Essentially, in one device ...


2

The phenomenon derives from a faulty Apple Script mounting a Time Machine sparsebundle image from a smb-share serving as a Time Machine backup volume to /Volumes. The mounted image interferes with (maybe any) other mounted volume(s) there The faulty Apple Script: try mount volume "smb://someserver/DATA" end try do shell script "/usr/bin/perl -Ue ...


2

Klanomath's procedures are 100% correct if it's a hard drive. I use a tool named Scannerz to evaluate drives and it's extremely conservative. If you find bad blocks their procedures are pretty much exactly what Klanomath described, except it will be quite evident how extensive the damage is during testing. SMART technology only finds bad sectors if a write ...


2

This requires the three partitions between the selected one and the intended one to be moved. Disk Utility can't do this without destructively destroying and recreating the partitions in the intended location, removing all data from the partitions. You will need third-party software such as iPartition. For more information, see Partitioning Software.


2

Disk Utility can't do it, but iPartition can - http://www.coriolis-systems.com/iPartition.php Tested on both GUID & MBR formatted drives.


2

I know it's a bit late now, but if you can format the blank space as MS-DOS, then Bootcamp Assistant will assume it's a Windows installation, and help you remove it.


2

Yes! First get the UUID of the partition you want to prevent from mounting... You can get this in Disk Utility "Get Info". Now open your /etc/fstab file for editing: sudo pico /etc/fstab In this file add the following line (use your own UUID naturally): UUID=[your UUID] none hfs rw,noauto 0 0 And save the file. Restart for the change to take ...


2

Here's two extra nuggets of knowledge that may be of assistance: the smartmontools package is also available under MacPorts. If you have MacPorts installed, sudo port install smartmontools will do the trick the df command will quickly give you an idea of what is mounted where.


2

You could try booting off a Linux LiveUSB to back up your files. Once that is done, you can reformat your HD and then reinstall OS X. You should also keep an eye on your HD; these types of errors often suggest that your drive is corrupted or damaged.



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