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12

I recently had the same question and found a command line tool www.smartmontools.org which can be installed via brew: brew install smartmontools you can then run it smartctl -a disk0s3 for the full report where disk0s3 is the disks physical backing which can be found in Disk Utility.app by getting info on the drive. (There must be a way to find this ...


11

If I understand your question correctly you are trying to resize the volume group or actually one of the volumes within a group. From what I could gather your disk was converted to a CoreStorage Volume. Could you please verify that by issuing the following command in a terminal and check if you get a similar output to the one in the picture: diskutil ...


10

The HDD is formatted using FAT32 which has a known limitation of 4GB file size. You need to format it using exFAT which is supported by OS X and Windows.


7

If your partition turned into Logical Volume Group (you can't resize or delete Yosemite partition), you can revert partition type with few command line. Open Terminal type "diskutil corestorage list" Find Yosemite partition UUID string. type "diskutil corestorage revert " Your Yosemite partition is now revert to default partition type. Now, you can resize ...


5

If you are facing a healthy file system at the level of its structure and want to find files which have disk faulty blocks, here is how I would proceed: Make a full backup of your disk with Time Machine or Carbon Copy Cloner Check this backup. Run the following heavy and risky (in case you do have bad blocks outside of your filesystem structure) command: ...


5

There is a slim chance to repair it with command line (in Terminal) fsck Option 3 (advanced): Use the command line and the fsck_hfs -l command. Start up your computer and log in as an administrator. Open Terminal (/Applications/Utilities). At the prompt, type the following command and then press Return to determine your filesytem ID: df -hl Look for ...


5

The following diskutil cs resizeStack command is vastly undocumented and as such potentially destructive. There might be an easy way outlined first and a long winding, time consuming hard way. Please backup your Mac OS X before proceeding. The not-as-long-as-expected way: A 2nd computer or an iPhone with the stackexchange credentials to enter the site ...


4

To be able to create a multi-boot environment you have to revert from a CoreStorage partition layout to a standard partition layout. Start to internet recovery mode by pressing altcmdR while booting. Open Terminal.app in the menubar Utilities → Terminal enter diskutil cs revert LVUUID and hit the ⏎ key. (LVUUID is the Logical Volume UUID. You get it by ...


4

Theoretically everything is fine with your Fusion Drive. Fusion Drives look like this. Disk0 is your SSD with 121 GB and disk1 is your HDD with ~1 TB (~1.121 TB summed up). The larger parts of your SSD (disk0s2) and your HDD (disk1s2) are pooled to a CoreStorage LVG (Fusion Drive: disk3) with a size of 967.8 GB. The rest is reserved for EFIs, a Recovery HD ...


4

Reboot in single user mode by holding the Command + S during boot. When you see a prompt (should look like root # or something similar), type fsck -f and press Return. This is Mac's built-in filesystem consistency check tool and allows you to find and repair errors with the startup file system. Run this command until you don't see **The volume [volume name] ...


4

I highly recommend completely backing up the machine before attempting this, either using TM with no exclusions set, or better yet, cloning the whole drive using a program like Carbon Copy Cloner. Unmount the Logical Volume: sudo diskutil unmount force /dev/disk1 Remove the Logical Volume Group and all of its contents: sudo diskutil cs deleteLVG ...


3

The Disk Utility Repair Permissions command is just a front end for the repair_packages program. Use this: /usr/libexec/repair_packages --repair --standard-pkgs


3

I had a similar problem. I created a 30 GB partition and after deleting it there was unused space. I couldn't manually get the original full partition back because of disk errors. So I booted into Recovery (Command + R), repaired the disk with Disk Utility and then the resize to original was no problem. Rebooted and now back to normal. Had no need to ...


3

You do know that RAID 0 is only striping and not only provides no redundancy, but increases the risk of data loss as the failure of any single drive can mean the loss of the entire storage pool? RAID 0 is only for increasing read and write speeds, for example for video editing. You need at least RAID 1 or 5 for redundancy. That being said, if you're losing ...


3

I've struggled for some days with the same problem but now it is solved. The problem was a faulty SATA cable. I've replaced it with a new one and now everything works as expected.


3

The apparent issues seems related to FileVault. The following steps seem to be the cure: Go to “System Preferences” – “Security and Privacy”, click on “FileVault” tab, click the lock icon on the bottom left to unlock, then click on “Turn Off FileVault”. The decryption process will take a while (hours). When the decryption is done, reboot into Recovery HD. ...


3

Basically you have a CoreStorage Logical Volume Group without a CoreStorage Logical Volume now. You may delete your Logical Volume Group (-> step 4) or restore a Logical Volume (-> step 7). Requirements: Booted to Recovery Mode Please quit Disk Utility. Open Utilities/Terminal in the menubar Enter diskutil cs list and hit enter. The output will look like ...


3

You cannot erase the currently-running volume. Shut the computer down, restart while holding the option key, and choose the Recovery HD. Find Disk Utility in the menus and you will now be able to erase your internal storage.


2

Klanomath's procedures are 100% correct if it's a hard drive. I use a tool named Scannerz to evaluate drives and it's extremely conservative. If you find bad blocks their procedures are pretty much exactly what Klanomath described, except it will be quite evident how extensive the damage is during testing. SMART technology only finds bad sectors if a write ...


2

You could try booting off a Linux LiveUSB to back up your files. Once that is done, you can reformat your HD and then reinstall OS X. You should also keep an eye on your HD; these types of errors often suggest that your drive is corrupted or damaged.


2

There are at least two approaches to solve your problem: One is potentially destructive, vastly undocumented and i don't know if it works (1) and the other one is for sure destructive (2). So please backup your Mac OS X and your Ubuntu partition if necessary. Requirements: USB thumb drive with a full working Mac OS X and iPartition installed or a Linux ...


2

I've figured it out! Though still appears that converting a dmg file to an encrypted one using Disk Utility is still broken as of OS X 10.10 (Yosemite), I've figured out a way to do it via terminal using this: hdiutil convert /PATH/TO/FILE -format UDZO -encryption AES-256 -o /OUTPUT/FILE This converts a dmg using AES-256 encryption and uses zlib ...


2

You're using Apple's RAID which means you need a device which just hosts the discs and then your new laptop will see them and use the existing RAID structure. This rules out NAS. AS these are existing RAID arrays you can't simple merge them together to create a single new RAID. At least, you can't while keeping the data on them. Essentially, in one device ...


2

A clean install is not necessary, you simply need to reconfigure your NVRAM (nvram boot-args=kext-dev-mode=1) to disable the kext signing requirement for OS X. (After which, you can remove your TRIM enabler and reverse this change or leave it until the next time your NVRAM is changed/resets) A very clear explanation of OS X 10.10 Yosemite's new policy ...


2

Boot into Recovery from the USB. Instead of opening Disk Utility, open Terminal instead. Run the command diskutil list to see that your drive is being recognised. It should list two disks, one being your bootable drive, the other your SSD, and provide you with a disk identifier (such as disk0). If it doesn't show up, check that you have installed it ...


2

Disk1 is a "virtual device" which resides in disk0s2 (the Apple_CoreStorage Volume Group which actually contains a FileVault volume). You have only one 'physical device' indeed. Disk0s5 is probably an old Bootcamp installation. The clean way (get rid of the 2 Recovery HDs): Make a complete Time Machine backup of Macintosh HD. Start to Internet Recovery ...


2

The phenomenon derives from a faulty Apple Script mounting a Time Machine sparsebundle image from a smb-share serving as a Time Machine backup volume to /Volumes. The mounted image interferes with (maybe any) other mounted volume(s) there The faulty Apple Script: try mount volume "smb://someserver/DATA" end try do shell script "/usr/bin/perl -Ue ...


2

One of these icons represents the hard drive (the one with gobbledygook as a name), whereas the other represents a partition inside that hard drive. Usually there's a single partition per drive, but some power users may have reasons to create more than one. If you fall into the default case of a single partition, and you intend on staying that way -- or just ...


2

The following procedure should format your SD card to make it usable again and cause bad sectors on the card to be remapped if that is part of your problem. Warning, erasing the wrong drive could make you cry so make sure that you know what you are doing. Before inserting the SD card into your Mac, make sure that the write protect (lock) switch is turned ...


2

Yes - OS X offers software RAID functionality on both the Server version and consumer OS. Open Disk Utility and read through the help on RAID. Create a single, large disk from several smaller disks by creating a concatenated disk set, which is also called “Just a Bunch of Disks” (JBOD) or “spanning.” The concatenated disk set acts as one large disk with ...



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