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7

First, note that Device Block Size is different from the block size in use by the filesystem. The former value as reported by diskutil refers to the raw block size used by the hardware. I haven't found an easy way to check the latter value by the command line, but you can just create a zero-byte file then do Get Info from the Finder. It will say 0 bytes, but ...


6

It's simply telling you that the file has been modified, and because it's currently being accessed Disk Utility can't fix the permissions on it. ARDAgent.app is the Apple Remote Desktop agent, and the file shown in the path above is the binary file contained within the app package. This indicates that the app is currently open, and therefore in use. It's ...


5

There certainly isn't the same amount necessary as the DMG, so you sure can mount a 100GB DMG into a file system that has less (there will be trivial consumptions, maybe a few kb, but nothting that you'll notice). The whole thing works in the way, that the system attaches a file-system driver to the file with the DMG. The driver will present the DMG file ...


4

The OS X device block size can be determined by executing the following command from a Terminal window prompt: diskutil info / | grep "Block Size" Which will output the following information: Device Block Size: 512 Bytes The file system block size can be determined by using the stat utility: stat -f %k . Which will show you the Optimal file system ...


4

You can use force unmount a drive by running the following Terminal command: diskutil unmountDisk force /Volumes/VOLUMENAME Replace VOLUMENAME with the name of a volume on the disk you are trying to unmount. Following this, attempt to Erase/Partition the drive again in Disk Utility. Note: Using the above command can interrupt file read/writes, which ...


3

I assume that at least one of the updates required a restart. As Disk Utility found problems with the file system, it's possible that: some such problems existed before your friend attempted to install updates; and/or some such problems arose from a forced shut down or forced restart during a problematic installation (before an automated restart), or ...


3

From this blog post: A customized .sparseimage file can be made larger than the total capacity of the physical volume on which it originally resides. While the sparse image volume will seem to make that capacity available, attempting to exceed the physical capacity of the underlying volume will result in a disk error: "ran out of space." A couple of ...


3

NOTE FOR CASUAL READERS: rm -rf destroys data. Use with caution. rm -rf may appear to go fast, but it is actually recursively going depth-first into each directory and unlinking the files within—the same operation that is used for any file deletion on Unix systems. You can see how rm -rf works by adding the -v flag, e.g. rm -rfv. There's no reason to ...


3

None of the HFS flavors will offer any performance benefit that's measurable. I have seen encryption slow down some storage medium such as slow USB flash and I would expect journaling there to also be more of a slowdown than on storage with fast cache or more responsive write service times. I suppose journaling could in some rare circumstances (bizarre edge ...


3

You can use diskutil cs list to show the core storage view of things. Once you have the logical volume UUID for the disk in question, you can use diskutil cs deleteVolume to clean up the reserved space that was allocated to the encrypted data and filesystems. That would allow you to surgically remove the core storage. You could also unmount the filesystems ...


2

This can be done from the Disk Utility app or from the diskutil command line. Be warned that you should definitely make a backup before doing anything. I had an issue where the diskutil appleraid enable mirror disk1s2 command I ran wrapped the volume in a RAID set but the partition is now called Apple_RAID_Offline and no longer accessible. Ironically ...


2

When you have this kind of error, typically it occurs because the device is mounted and there is something accessing the information on the mounted disk. Whatever is causing you to be unable to eject the disk is the same reason the disk utility can't unmount the drive to erase it. Likely culprits for things still accessing your files include applications ...


2

Same problem here. Read and on and I'll tell you what I did to solve this problem: I do Time Machine to an encrypted external Hard Disk. I stored the password to the disk in the default Keychain, and the system mounted the disk automatically after plugging it in. But suddenly, last morning, after I plugged in the disk, it prompted me for a password (it ...


2

You're thinking of RAID-1 in the wrong way. RAID-1 is not an architecture intended to happily use a single surviving drive within a raid-1 group, and work out mirroring content later. Ultimately it will do that, but that is considered a recovery operation from a failed state, and it will destructively overwrite the mirror drive after replacement. In RAID-1, ...


2

For redundancy and performance Apple steers you towards RAID 10. I built a 4 disk array by doing a mirrored pair of striped disks which I then converted to a core storage volume to facilitate easier expansion later and FileVault. I can watch data be written to both stripes with iostat but when I read, presumably this is abstracted by cs, as I see zero bytes ...


2

I also have this issue... MacPro, 3TB drive (Seagate). I have to use the terminal: diskutil list diskutil unmount /dev/disk22 diskutil eraseDisk HFS+ "Macintosh HD" /dev/disk22 etc etc to utilize this drive correctly. (Sorry for all the commands. Posting them just in case it helps someone. Though anyone using those commands better know what they do ...


2

Since your install didn't complete, it's entirely likely you still have a Mountain Lion recovery HD and can simply wipe the entire drive and start over with Mountain Lion to ensure it's really a hardware issue (or rule out a hardware issue). OS X Mountain Lion: Erase and reinstall OS X - http://support.apple.com/kb/ph11273 Just power it off, press the ...


2

If you haven't already made backups, you can start up from the recovery partition and save a disk image of the main OS X volume (or other volumes you use) to a different drive in Disk Utility. The first thing I'd try would be to do an upgrade install of 10.7 by choosing Reinstall OS X without erasing anything first. If that wouldn't work, I'd do a clean ...


2

I had the same problem after converting a disk. There was a message displayed by diskutil cs convert: Couldn't unmount disk0s4; converted volume won't appear until it's unmounted I solved the problem by unmounting the disk and repairing it : diskutil unmount force disk0s4 diskutil repairVolume disk0s4


2

Aloha, counterbeing - I think we've worked together before! I like the previous answer that creates a partition, but if that doesn't work for you, try this: Create your Disk Image (I've used a sparse bundle disk image). Mount the disk image From the command line, enter the following: sudo tmutil setdestination /Volumes/{mounted-image-name} • Start Time ...


2

did you try: hdiutil convert -format UDRW -o ~/path/to/target.img ~/path/to/target.iso after that unmount using: diskutil unmountDisk /dev/diskX (X is the disknumber of your usb device) Now just burn it using dd sudo dd if=/path/to/target.img of=/dev/rdiskN bs=1m


2

Quit Disk Utility if it's open. Open the Terminal application in /Applications/Utilities. Type this exact command and hit Enter key: defaults write com.apple.DiskUtility DUDebugMenuEnabled 1 Quit the Terminal application. Launch Disk Utility and you will have a the Debug menu.


2

The Debug menu mostly gives access to functions in relation to hidden partitions (e.g. the system-restore-partition in Lion). see Debug Menu Most likely the Debug menu is mainly for Apple internal use (their techs dealing with stuff probably found these functions useful) so it's hidden by default.


2

In addition to the Unix file permissions, there are old HFS file bits. To unlock your folder try: Terminal > SetFile -a l ~/sites/lockedfolder OR Terminal > chflags nouchg ~/sites/lockedfolder Alternatively, you could do a Get Info in the Finder, and uncheck the "Locked" checkbox from that window.


2

The resizing can be finicky when there is a gap in the space between the partitions. Especially when if not all the logical volumes / partitions are HFS+ format. It's not clear that you will be able to do this without seeing the core storage listing and the normal listing: diskutil list diskutil cs list The first shows how the filesystems are mounted ...


2

a) You can use the free and open source Mac Linux USB Loader app to make a bootable USB drive. OR b) Follow the instructions for How to create a bootable USB stick on OS X (it has a step to convert ISO files to IMG before writing it to the USB drive).


2

iPartition For all my partitioning, I use and recommend iPartition. It will allow you to resize partitions without deleting any data. It also works for Boot Camp volumes and other PC disks. With iPartition, resizing a partition is as simple as selecting it, grabbing the resize handle and dragging. Not only that, but if you have several operations to ...


2

Have you tried looking at the kernel log messages? If, as you said earlier, it tried to root from the drive at least once, you can try to find it in the /var/log/system.log, for example: $ grep 'rooting\ via' /var/log/system.log Oct 24 18:01:44 localhost kernel[0]: rooting via boot-uuid from /chosen: 4AB3D289-884F-379C-AF7B-************ Oct 25 11:21:57 ...


2

Your partition table does not know about the larger hard drive yet. While Disk Utility also queries the hard disk size and lets you request it to enlarge your partition, it will fail when finally changing the partition size (after doing a file system check). This can be solved on different ways: One is to destroy the GPT (partition table) and recreate it ...


2

One of these icons represents the hard drive (the one with gobbledygook as a name), whereas the other represents a partition inside that hard drive. Usually there's a single partition per drive, but some power users may have reasons to create more than one. If you fall into the default case of a single partition, and you intend on staying that way -- or just ...



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