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You cannot erase the currently-running volume. Shut the computer down, restart while holding the option key, and choose the Recovery HD. Find Disk Utility in the menus and you will now be able to erase your internal storage.


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You could try booting off a Linux LiveUSB to back up your files. Once that is done, you can reformat your HD and then reinstall OS X. You should also keep an eye on your HD; these types of errors often suggest that your drive is corrupted or damaged.


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Boot into Recovery from the USB. Instead of opening Disk Utility, open Terminal instead. Run the command diskutil list to see that your drive is being recognised. It should list two disks, one being your bootable drive, the other your SSD, and provide you with a disk identifier (such as disk0). If it doesn't show up, check that you have installed it ...


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Disk1 is a "virtual device" which resides in disk0s2 (the Apple_CoreStorage Volume Group which actually contains a FileVault volume). You have only one 'physical device' indeed. Disk0s5 is probably an old Bootcamp installation. The clean way (get rid of the 2 Recovery HDs): Make a complete Time Machine backup of Macintosh HD. Start to Internet Recovery ...


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Basically you have a CoreStorage Logical Volume Group without a CoreStorage Logical Volume now. You may delete your Logical Volume Group (-> step 4) or restore a Logical Volume (-> step 7). Requirements: Booted to Recovery Mode Please quit Disk Utility. Open Utilities/Terminal in the menubar Enter diskutil cs list and hit enter. The output will look like ...


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This should do the trick: In Terminal: diskutil eraseDisk MS-DOS <newname> <diskID> where is the new name for the disk and is the disk identifier (you can find this by getting the disk info from Finder or Disk Utility, or by typing "diskutil list" into Terminal).


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Boot holding Command ⌘ R at the chimes to boot into Recovery Mode, run Disk Utility & Repair Disk.


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There is no need to delete the CoreStorage Logical Volume Group. Just resize it: Have a backup! Reboot into Internet Recovery Mode (hold Option-Command-R) as the machine is restarting). You'll eventually be presented with a Max OS X Utilities window. In the menu bar along the top of the screen, click Utilities -> Terminal. At the prompt, enter ...


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I figured it out! Open Disk Utility. In the left-hand panel, select the disk image you would like to resize (the DMG file), then click the Resize Image button in the toolbar, and then enter the new size. Click Log to ensure that it resized successfully. Click Open to mount the volume. (You may also mount the volume manually by opening the disk image in the ...


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Have you got access to another mac? Your best bet would be to connect other mac using target disk mode, either via firewire or thunderbolt. Your internal drive will show up on the desktop of the other mac for you to copy off your files. Other option would be booting up via an other system via an external drive, open disk utility and try to repair a couple ...


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Attach your thumb-drive and copy all contained files & folders to your external drive, then start Disk Utility. Copy Install OS X Yosemite to your external drive Choose your thumb drive in the left pane and repartition it to 1 Partition, click the Options-button, choose GUID Partition Table and OK, then Apply Quit Disk Utility and open Install ...


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I/O problems are a good indicator that your drive is past its best. Replace the drive or do the following... Back up everything of value via Target Disk Mode (if possible) then boot your MacBook from a USB or DVD installer. Run Disk Utility, selecting the secure erase/zero fill option and wipe your drive. This will issue an ATA secure erase command that ...



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