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5

It depends on your viewpoint: a file written to an encrypted disk image is immediately written encrypted to the HDD/SSD where the disk image resides. Since the file system of the unlocked disk image is still mounted, the file appears as "unencrypted". So a user, who can access the raw HDD/SSD only, can't read/decode the file content, but a user with the ...


5

When using OS X, it's usually more advisable to use diskutil for disk-related activities. TL;DR: To mount a volume/disk by identifier: diskutil mount /dev/diskXsY # mounts just that volume diskutil mountDisk /dev/diskX # mounts the whole disk To mount a volume by UUID: diskutil mount [Volume/Partition UUID] To mount a volume by label: ...


4

Your main volume is encrypted with FileVault and still locked – consequently it doesn't show up in /Volumes. Before being able to mount it you'd have to unlock it: diskutil cs unlockVolume lvUUID #replace lvUUID by the one shown in the diskutil listing You will then be asked to enter the passphrase/password. You have to enter a passphrase or a password of ...


3

Boot to Recovery Mode (hold cmdR while booting). In the menubar open Utilities -> Terminal. Now change your working directory and go to /Volumes: cd /Volumes List all volumes: ls -l Move to your main volume cd name_of_main_volume Now you can move forward to a directory to remove files and folders with cd folder_name. Appropriate paths to remove ...


2

Remove all external disks (just for safety reasons). If possible also remove all internal disks except the boot disk or "refresh" your backups. The proposed command (dd) used improperly can be deadly for your data. Open Terminal.app and get the disk identifier of the disk containing the DVD partition: diskutil list Unmount the disk: #replace diskX by ...


2

From man diskutil: unmount | umount [force] device Unmount a single volume. Force will force-unmount the volume (less kind to any open files; see also umount (8)). unmountDisk | umountDisk [force] device Unmount an entire disk (all volumes). Force will force-unmount the volumes (less kind to any open files; see also umount (8)). ...


2

You are using the command incorrectly. When issuing diskutil unmount, you should refer to a partition. You are referring to an entire disk. For example disk0 refers to the entire disk, where as, disk0s1 refers to partition 1 on disk 0. The letter s stands for slice which is another word for partition. On the other hand, it is Ok to refer to either the ...


2

Option 1: Disk Utility In Disk Utility: select the image in the sidebar, then File → Change Password... (You must unmount the image before you can reset it). Option 2: Terminal In Terminal: hdiutil chpass <image> More info: man hdiutil


1

Try to return everything back: diskutil resizevolume disk0s2 R and then: diskutil resizeVolume disk0s2 480G jhfsx InstallOSX 10G Resizing a volume that is currently set as the computer’s startup disk will invalidate that setting; use the Startup Disk System Preferences panel or bless (8) to reset the resized volume as the startup disk.


1

You show in your posted image that the partition is encrypted. I was unaware a partition could be encrypted without using core storage. Anyway, I believe the correct command to fix your drive is given below. sudo diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 R The command should move /dev/disk0s3 to the bottom of disk0 while resizing /dev/disk0s2 to maximum ...


1

The disk "Flash Player" is still attached to the filesystem. Go into /Volumes, and you should see it there. There are two ways to proceed, the GUI method, or the command line method. Use whichever you are most comfortable with. GUI: Navigate to /Volumes and press ⌘ Command+E. This will eject the volume. CLI: diskutil eject /dev/diskx, in this case disk35. ...


1

Probably the upgrade to El Capitan and the conversion of your main OS X volume (disk0s2) to a CoreStorage volume (disk0s2 & disk1) wreak havoc with the GUID partition table entry of your Boot Camp partition. You partition table should look similar to this one: ... 325312736 1269536 3 GPT part - 426F6F74-0000-11AA-AA11-00306543ECAC 326582272 ...


1

To most easily resolve this, you need to erase your USB drive with a "Master Boot Record" scheme. Steps: Open Disk Utility Select the USB drive Click "Erase" Choose Format "MS-DOS (FAT)" MOST IMPORTANT: Choose Scheme "Master Boot Record" Click Erase button Many thanks to nholtappels for figuring out the problem!


1

In Disk Utility find the HDD you are trying to format in the left hand column. Select the disk and not the volume - that appears as child under it - to repartition it. Just choosing the volume erases or replaces the file system but not the partition table type. This may apparently fail if the partition map is mal-formed. If you feel confident with ...



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