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This is likely coming from one or two things (or both). Partitioning a disk, any disk, takes up drive space. In the megabyte range it is not even noticeable. In the gigabyte range it can be a substantial byte (sorry...) out of the drive. Also computer makers and Drive/RAM makers often calculate bytes differently. O/S companies (Apple, Microsoft, etc...) ...


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How old is the drive? Flash memory has limited write cycles, and it will slowly change into a read-only device. If you have been writing stuff to the drive for a few years it is quite possible some blocks have reached their write limit and the controller has marked them as unusable. Cheaper drive -> fewer cycles. Also note that the one-pass-of-zeros secure ...


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If you format a drive as Encrypted, you are in fact turning on File Vault, as that's the only encryption layer that OS X supports. The main advantage of partitioning the drive as Journaled, and then turning on File Vault is that you can revert the drive to a simple unencrypted volume if you should choose to do so in the future. You can't do this with a ...


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Sorry to hear of your situation. The first megabyte will have included the drive's partition and critical structural information. If you can, dd all the remaining content to another drive as a back-up of sorts. Then I suspect your best choice is a professional repair service or a tool like DiskWarrior: DiskWarrior Everything just disappeared after ...


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From the Tom's Hardware Forum: By default, the OSX disk utility creates a new partition as GUID. Windows can't read it. You need to create the partition type as MBR, which Windows can read. Then format as exFAT and both machines will read it.


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Your main disk uses a Core Storage partition scheme: disk0 is your main system disk. disk1 is a "virtual" disk residing in disk0s2 containing the Macintosh HD volume visible on your desktop. The first two sectors of a Logical Volume contain zeros only. Examples: disk2 is the Core Storage Volume pooling disk0s2 (SSD) and disk1s2 (HDD) of a 3.1 TB ...


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Internet recovery loads from the internet and runs in RAM. Presumably you have more than 1.28GB of RAM. OS X Base System is the base system for recovery, not your internal drive. Based on that, it cannot see your internal drive at all. There's not much you can do if the computer itself can't see the drive. If there's any way you can get this into an Apple ...


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It sounds like there is a problem with the USB installer. To confirm this, restart holding Option + R to return to Disk Utility, and verify you formatted the drive as "Mac OS X Extended (Journaled). If you have a working bootable usb, holding the "option" key should show you the Startup Manager menu: https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT204417 Here are a ...


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Disk Utility repair functions are (from what I have heard) just a front end to FSCK, so that will likely give you the same results. You could try another disk repair utility (diskWarrior, techtool, etc...), or if you have a recent backup I would be tempted to wipe the drive and start over. If you have another Mac you could put that Mac into target disk ...


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Update 2 Based on the current state of your MBR and GUID partition tables, I recommend the following steps to finish fixing your computer. I do not think it is necessary to boot to Internet Recovery Mode before entering these commands. Make a Time Machine or other form of backup. (Just in case.) Execute my Update 1 on /dev/disk0. Upon completion, the ...


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Basically you have to delete the linux partitions (disk0s4 and disk0s5) and then expand your CoreStorage volume (Macintosh HD) to the full size. Boot to Internet Recovery Mode by pressing altcmdR while booting Open Terminal in the menubar -> Utilities enter diskutil list and diskutil cs list to get the partition and the CoreStorage listing. Now unmount all ...


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ran into the same problem and found this article that fixes it a little easier Just run diskutil coreStorage list, find the logical volume uuid, and then run diskutil coreStorage revert (that uuid) in your case diskutil coreStorage revert 2F7B1893-07E8-4194-840B-F2552042E055 http://awesometoast.com/yosemite-core-storage-and-partition-woes/


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The following page has a lot of explanation on it but I've provided the quick steps below. Side note, try verify and repair and fix permissions in the app first to see if that does it. Erase disk via terminal Start in terminal with this command: diskutil list Next verify and repair the usb drive with this command putting the disk name I where it says ...


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You should be fine, and you got really lucky because you failed your way into saving your disk. I'll first break down your dd command: dd if=/dev/zero of=/dev/rdisk1 Copy everything from zero to /dev/rdisk1 (your main disk, ouch!) bs=1024 Sets the size of the blocks to be copied. In this case, you are coping in 1Kb blocks. This is more important in the ...



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