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23

You can use the dd command to make a bit-perfect clone of a drive. It's a command line tool that ships with OS X. In order to make the clone perfect you'll need to ensure the source and the destination aren't actively in use. To prepare for the clone I recommend creating a secondary boot disk that you can boot from. Your source for the clone should be an ...


22

OK, this isn't too bad. Reboot while holding Command ⌘-S to enter single user mode. When it gives you a prompt, type fsck -fy then press return. it will repair your disk. When it's done, type reboot and try partitioning again.


14

Most of the difference you're seeing is due to Time Machine's "Local Snapshots" feature. When Time Machine is turned on but the backup device isn't available, it backs up to the local volume. The space used for these local snapshots is counted as "in use" by Disk Utility and System Information, but not the Finder (see the Disk Space considerations section ...


12

FAT32 (called MS-DOS (FAT) by Disk Utility; a filesystem originally released in 1977 and updated a few times since, lastly in 1996) really is the only cross platform filesystem that is going to work fully out of the box with Windows and Mac OS X. Be careful though, if you are using Disk Utility to format the drive, you should make sure to choose the Master ...


11

From the DropDMG manual: Sparse bundle disk images appear as a single file but are actually stored as a folder with many files inside. This makes it more efficient to back them up using Time Machine or other backup utilities, as only the changed parts need to be copied. Additionally, sparse bundle disk images work well with the Compact ...


11

On Snow Leopard, you would need to boot from an external OS to wipe the drive. On Mountain Lion (or Lion), the system makes a recovery HD so you can self-wipe the Mac. This is a much, much faster and easier task, so I recommend you upgrade first and then do the wiping using a recovery boot and Disk Utility. I personally would do these steps (and you could ...


9

If your goal is to completely wipe all data which is on your current boot disk, then follow the procedure below. Insert the Mac OS X CD. Restart the computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press and hold the "C" key to start up from CD. When the Installer screen appears, do not click Continue. Instead, choose Installer > Open Disk Utilities. ...


8

Open Terminal.app and run df -h /: % df -h / Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on /dev/disk1s2 111Gi 75Gi 36Gi 68% / On my machine my OS drive is on /dev/disk1s2. With this information you can use the Disk Utility app and find out what physical drive your OS is on: Using diskutil from command line you're OS drive will be ...


8

Looks like your MacSSD2 partition has been turned into a Core Storage volume. Core Storage is Apple's underlying system for disk encryption - I assume you enabled encryption when you created the partition? You can show the Core Storage volume group using the command diskutil cs list and then delete it using diskutil cs delete <volumegroup-uuid>, where ...


7

First, note that Device Block Size is different from the block size in use by the filesystem. The former value as reported by diskutil refers to the raw block size used by the hardware. I haven't found an easy way to check the latter value by the command line, but you can just create a zero-byte file then do Get Info from the Finder. It will say 0 bytes, but ...


6

Here is my current solution: boot from OS X DVD - mandatory! open terminal diskutil list umount "/Volumes/Macintosh HD" fsck -f /dev/disk0s2 diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 100G


6

You can use hdiutil to mount a disk image that is protected with a passphrase. hdiutil attach -agentpass /path/to/image.dmg That should attempt to mount the disk image, prompting you for the passphrase. If it's encrypted with a public key, you can pass that using option -pubkey.


6

Just found the answer here. Basically, from the terminal, type: sudo diskutil cs list You'll get a list of your drives and a bunch of related info. Look for the one you want to format and grab its Logical Volume Group's UUID. It should look something like this: Logical Volume Group XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX Then erase the drive by executing ...


5

You can't change where each partition starts (i.e. where the top of it is in the partition diagram), only where it ends. But in your case, since you have a free block as large as the partition you want to change, you can work around it (warning, this is untested under Lion, so make sure you have a good backup first): Create a new volume in the blank space ...


5

My answer from a similar question: Best File System for Sharing Between OS X and Windows If you're working exclusively with 10.6.6 or greater on the Mac side, try exFAT. Native read/write support under Windows and OS X, and none of the file size limits of FAT32. Disk Utility will happily format your drives using it. It's probably your best option, as it ...


5

In fact, Disk Utility does use fsck to check the disk in question. "Verify Disk" uses /sbin/fsck_hfs -fn -x /dev/diskX while "Repair Disk" runs /sbin/fsck_hfs -fy -x /dev/diskX These are the options used: -f: 'f'orces a check, even if the disk seems to be clean -n: 'n'ever attempts to repair any found issues -y: says 'y'es to any question whether ...


5

Normally from the command line, you would use the diskutil command with the zeroDisk, randomDisk or secureErase options to securely wipe a disk. However, I would imagine this doesn't work on the disk you've just booted from. So I suspect you'll either have to find another Mac and connect yours in target disk mode via a Firewire cable, or physically remove ...


5

Repairing permissions only affects System files, and files installed from a package with the Installer, which give a BOM (Bill Of Materials, stored in the (~)/Receipts folder) that list the expected permissions. There is no meaning in repairing permissions for “a specific directory“, as an arbitrary directory has no expected permissions against which to ...


5

The Mac OS X base system image is not the cause of your problem. See What is the 'Mac OS X Base System' disk image on my 2011 MacBook AIr? for an explanation. My best guess, based on the screenshot, as to why you can't repartition the Hitachi disk is that it's the current startup device. You need to restart your computer from an an external ...


5

Doing a copy will not make the drive boot able. There are all kind of hidden files and "blessing" that needs to be done to make it boot able. For a really good description see What makes a volume bootable? And yes programs like Carbon Copy Cloner and SuperDuper! make this task very easy. Additionally, programs like those will let you select and choose what ...


5

Disk Utility can do volume-to-volume cloning with the Restore tab. Between two Mac OS Extended volumes, this'll do a block copy, i.e. it just copies the volume structures, so all the files come out identical (down to the file ID numbers). This is essentially the same thing dd does, except that Disk Utility can expand/contract the volume if the destination ...


5

You can do this with the hdiutil tool. The appropriate configuration in your case would be: hdiutil create -size 50m -fs HFS+ -volname Widget /path/to/save/widget.dmg Obviously change the "Widget" and path to whatever you need. A few additional options that may be useful: -srcfolder /path/to/source This will create the disk image with the data in the ...


5

Just tried this myself and confirmed that the executable gives the error you mentioned: "JDiskReport" is damaged and can't be opened. You should move it to the Trash. I was able to get it to run setup by Ctrl-clicking JDiskReport.app, clicking Show Package Contents and navigating to Contents/Resources/Java/jdskreport-1.4.0.jar. Ctrl-clicking this .jar ...


5

Target Disk Mode If the Mac you want to erase supports Target Disk Mode, and you have a second compatible Mac (you need to use either Firewire or Thunderbolt on both), you can use the second Mac to erase the target one. Boot up into Target Disk Mode (hold down T), and the target Mac will appear as an external drive on the second Mac. Then you can run Disk ...


5

There certainly isn't the same amount necessary as the DMG, so you sure can mount a 100GB DMG into a file system that has less (there will be trivial consumptions, maybe a few kb, but nothting that you'll notice). The whole thing works in the way, that the system attaches a file-system driver to the file with the DMG. The driver will present the DMG file ...


5

It's simply telling you that the file has been modified, and because it's currently being accessed Disk Utility can't fix the permissions on it. ARDAgent.app is the Apple Remote Desktop agent, and the file shown in the path above is the binary file contained within the app package. This indicates that the app is currently open, and therefore in use. It's ...


4

Easy method: iPartition ($45) It gives you the option in the program to create a bootable DVD if you want to make changes to your boot drive. You could also run it from another Mac with the Mac you want to modify booted into Target Disk Mode. Definitely not free, but it will save you a headache.


4

Have you considered using diskutil info /dev/disk[n|s{n}] | grep Ejectable which allows you to identify whether the device (or device slice) is ejectable. This would need to be expanded upon in a script using awk to work through each disk device that is currently attached to determine whether it can be ejected and then eject it.


4

Sparse bundle disk image is an optimized form of the sparse disk image. It optimizes intentionally to reduce network load upon backup of changes to the filesystem at the expense of time and space. Specifically it uses a hashing function to store bits of data across a large directory structure which allows changes to be isolated in smaller band files. When ...


4

Use rsync. rsync is included in MacOS X, it's widely recognised in the unix world and it can be used locally and on the network and can preserve hardlinks, attributes and permissions. Check the manual page for more information, IMHO this should work: rsync -avHE /Volumes/Source/ /Volumes/Destination/ (archive, verbose, preserve hardlinks, preserve ...



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