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25

You can use the dd command to make a bit-perfect clone of a drive. It's a command line tool that ships with OS X. In order to make the clone perfect you'll need to ensure the source and the destination aren't actively in use. To prepare for the clone I recommend creating a secondary boot disk that you can boot from. Your source for the clone should be an ...


24

OK, this isn't too bad. Reboot while holding Command ⌘-S to enter single user mode. When it gives you a prompt, type fsck -fy then press return. it will repair your disk. When it's done, type reboot and try partitioning again.


14

Most of the difference you're seeing is due to Time Machine's "Local Snapshots" feature. When Time Machine is turned on but the backup device isn't available, it backs up to the local volume. The space used for these local snapshots is counted as "in use" by Disk Utility and System Information, but not the Finder (see the Disk Space considerations section ...


13

Looks like your MacSSD2 partition has been turned into a Core Storage volume. Core Storage is Apple's underlying system for disk encryption - I assume you enabled encryption when you created the partition? You can show the Core Storage volume group using the command diskutil cs list and then delete it using diskutil cs delete <volumegroup-uuid>, where ...


12

FAT32 (called MS-DOS (FAT) by Disk Utility; a filesystem originally released in 1977 and updated a few times since, lastly in 1996) really is the only cross platform filesystem that is going to work fully out of the box with Windows and Mac OS X. Be careful though, if you are using Disk Utility to format the drive, you should make sure to choose the Master ...


11

From the DropDMG manual: Sparse bundle disk images appear as a single file but are actually stored as a folder with many files inside. This makes it more efficient to back them up using Time Machine or other backup utilities, as only the changed parts need to be copied. Additionally, sparse bundle disk images work well with the Compact ...


11

On Snow Leopard, you would need to boot from an external OS to wipe the drive. On Mountain Lion (or Lion), the system makes a recovery HD so you can self-wipe the Mac. This is a much, much faster and easier task, so I recommend you upgrade first and then do the wiping using a recovery boot and Disk Utility. I personally would do these steps (and you could ...


11

In terminal, you can use diskutil to get information about the drive, including the device block size: $ diskutil info / | grep "Block Size" Device Block Size: 512 Bytes


10

The HDD is formatted using FAT32 which has a known limitation of 4GB file size. You need to format it using exFAT which is supported by OS X and Windows.


9

FAT32 (called MS-DOS (FAT) in Disk Utility) is a cross compatible file format although you will be limited to 4GB maximum per single file. Plugins for the mac can also allow it to handle using NTFS volumes, which is a more desirable solution


9

If your goal is to completely wipe all data which is on your current boot disk, then follow the procedure below. Insert the Mac OS X CD. Restart the computer. Immediately after the startup sound, press and hold the "C" key to start up from CD. When the Installer screen appears, do not click Continue. Instead, choose Installer > Open Disk Utilities. ...


9

The problem appears to happen when you unmount the image using umount. Remount the image (either using hdiutil attach or just double click the image) and use the command hdiutil detach it again. This will unmount and eject the image. hdiutil detach /Volumes/<your image>


8

Selecting "MS-DOS (FAT)" will automatically format as FAT16 or FAT32 depending on the target's size.


8

Using exFAT would be a good idea if the Windows computer runs Vista or Windows 7. This is a “simple“ filesystem yet it supports > 4 Gb files and multi-terabyte partitions. For compatibility with 32 bits filesystems you still have to use MBR, not GPT.


8

I believe that simply copying the files manually won't be enough. I'd use SuperDuper for getting a "true" clone of the old drive.


8

Open Terminal.app and run df -h /: % df -h / Filesystem Size Used Avail Capacity Mounted on /dev/disk1s2 111Gi 75Gi 36Gi 68% / On my machine my OS drive is on /dev/disk1s2. With this information you can use the Disk Utility app and find out what physical drive your OS is on: Using diskutil from command line you're OS drive will be ...


7

First, note that Device Block Size is different from the block size in use by the filesystem. The former value as reported by diskutil refers to the raw block size used by the hardware. I haven't found an easy way to check the latter value by the command line, but you can just create a zero-byte file then do Get Info from the Finder. It will say 0 bytes, but ...


7

It's simply telling you that the file has been modified, and because it's currently being accessed Disk Utility can't fix the permissions on it. ARDAgent.app is the Apple Remote Desktop agent, and the file shown in the path above is the binary file contained within the app package. This indicates that the app is currently open, and therefore in use. It's ...


6

Here is my current solution: boot from OS X DVD - mandatory! open terminal diskutil list umount "/Volumes/Macintosh HD" fsck -f /dev/disk0s2 diskutil resizevolume /dev/disk0s2 100G


6

Both Carbon Copy Cloner and SuperDuper can clone and omit files or directories from the clone.


6

The blue shaded area in the image provided is part of the Macintosh HD volume. The blue shading denotes the used space on a volume. The EFI boot system cannot be viewed or modified with any Apple-supplied GUI tool.


6

You can use hdiutil to mount a disk image that is protected with a passphrase. hdiutil attach -agentpass /path/to/image.dmg That should attempt to mount the disk image, prompting you for the passphrase. If it's encrypted with a public key, you can pass that using option -pubkey.


6

Disk Utility can do volume-to-volume cloning with the Restore tab. Between two Mac OS Extended volumes, this'll do a block copy, i.e. it just copies the volume structures, so all the files come out identical (down to the file ID numbers). This is essentially the same thing dd does, except that Disk Utility can expand/contract the volume if the destination ...


6

Just found the answer here. Basically, from the terminal, type: sudo diskutil cs list You'll get a list of your drives and a bunch of related info. Look for the one you want to format and grab its Logical Volume Group's UUID. It should look something like this: Logical Volume Group XXXXXXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXX-XXXXXXXXXXXX Then erase the drive by executing ...


6

You can force unmount a drive by running the following Terminal command: diskutil unmountDisk force /Volumes/VOLUMENAME Replace VOLUMENAME with the name of a volume on the disk you are trying to unmount. Following this, attempt to Erase/Partition the drive again in Disk Utility. Using the above command can interrupt file read/writes, which can cause file ...


5

There certainly isn't the same amount necessary as the DMG, so you sure can mount a 100GB DMG into a file system that has less (there will be trivial consumptions, maybe a few kb, but nothting that you'll notice). The whole thing works in the way, that the system attaches a file-system driver to the file with the DMG. The driver will present the DMG file ...


5

You can't change where each partition starts (i.e. where the top of it is in the partition diagram), only where it ends. But in your case, since you have a free block as large as the partition you want to change, you can work around it (warning, this is untested under Lion, so make sure you have a good backup first): Create a new volume in the blank space ...


5

If you are dealing exclusively with Windows XP and later (XP and 2003 after an update) and OS X 10.6.5 both systems will be able to read and write exFAT file systems. This will require no additional software to work and will deal with large file and storage sizes much better than FAT32.


5

My answer from a similar question: Best File System for Sharing Between OS X and Windows If you're working exclusively with 10.6.6 or greater on the Mac side, try exFAT. Native read/write support under Windows and OS X, and none of the file size limits of FAT32. Disk Utility will happily format your drives using it. It's probably your best option, as it ...


5

In fact, Disk Utility does use fsck to check the disk in question. "Verify Disk" uses /sbin/fsck_hfs -fn -x /dev/diskX while "Repair Disk" runs /sbin/fsck_hfs -fy -x /dev/diskX These are the options used: -f: 'f'orces a check, even if the disk seems to be clean -n: 'n'ever attempts to repair any found issues -y: says 'y'es to any question whether ...



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